Form S-4
Table of Contents

As filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 21, 2014

Registration No. 333-          

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

Form S-4

REGISTRATION STATEMENT

UNDER

THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933

 

 

MURPHY USA INC.*

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)

 

 

 

Delaware   5500   46-2279221

(State or Other Jurisdiction of

Incorporation or Organization)

 

(Primary Standard Industrial

Classification Code Number)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

200 Peach Street

El Dorado, AR 71730-5836

(870) 875-7600

(Address, Including Zip Code, and Telephone Number, Including Area Code, of Registrant’s Principal Executive Offices)

John A. Moore, Esq.

Senior Vice President, General

Counsel and Secretary

Murphy USA Inc.

200 Peach Street

El Dorado, AR 71730-5836

(870) 875-7600

(Name, Address, Including Zip Code, and Telephone Number, Including Area Code, of Agent For Service)

 

 

Copies to

Joseph A. Hall

Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP

450 Lexington Avenue

New York, New York 10017

(212) 450-4000

 

 

Approximate date of commencement of proposed sale to the public: As soon as practicable after the effective date of this Registration Statement.

If the securities being registered on this Form are being offered in connection with the formation of a holding company and there is compliance with General Instruction G, check the following box:  ¨

If this form is filed to register additional securities for an offering pursuant to Rule 462(b) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.  ¨                        

If this form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(d) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer   ¨    Accelerated filer   ¨
Non-accelerated filer   x  (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)    Smaller reporting company   ¨

*Certain subsidiaries of Murphy USA Inc. are also registrants and are identified on the following page.

If applicable, place an X in the box to designate the appropriate rule provision relied upon in conducting this transaction:

Exchange Act Rule 13e-4(i) (Cross-Border Issuer Tender Offer)  ¨

Exchange Act Rule 14d-1(d) (Cross-Border Third-Party Tender Offer)  ¨

CALCULATION OF REGISTRATION FEE

 

 

Title Of Each Class Of

Securities To Be Registered

 

Amount

To Be

Registered

 

Proposed

Maximum

Offering Price

Per Unit (1)

 

Proposed

Maximum

Aggregate

Offering Price (1)

 

Amount Of

Registration Fee

6.000% Senior Notes due 2023

  $500,000,000   100%   $500,000,000   $64,400

Guarantees of 6.000% Senior Notes due 2023

  (2)   (2)   (2)   (2)

 

 

(1) Estimated solely for the purpose of calculating the amount of the registration fee pursuant to Rule 457 under the Securities Act of 1933.
(2) No separate consideration will be received for the Guarantees of 6.000% Senior Notes due 2023 being registered hereby. As a result, in accordance with Rule 457(n) under the Securities Act, no registration fee is payable with respect to the guarantees.

 

 

The registrant hereby amends this Registration Statement on such date or dates as may be necessary to delay its effective date until the registrant shall file a further amendment which specifically states that this Registration Statement shall thereafter become effective in accordance with Section 8(a) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended or until the Registration Statement shall become effective on such date as the Commission, acting pursuant to said Section 8(a), may determine.

 

 

 


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TABLE OF ADDITIONAL REGISTRANTS

 

Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter*    State or Other
Jurisdiction of
Incorporation or
Organization
   Primary Standard
Industrial Classification
Code Number
     I.R.S. Employer
Identification Number
 

Murphy Oil USA, Inc.

   Delaware      5500         71-0727492   

591 Beverage, Inc.

   Nebraska      5500         45-0668000   

864 Holdings, Inc.

   Delaware      5500         27-0496160   

864 Beverage, Inc.

   Texas      5500         71-0831009   

Murphy Oil Trading Company (Eastern)

   Delaware      5500         71-6049824   

Spur Oil Corporation

   Delaware      5500         71-0361520   

Superior Crude Trading Company

   Delaware      5500         71-0818212   

 

* The address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of each registrant’s principal executive offices is c/o Murphy USA Inc. 200 Peach Street, El Dorado, Arkansas 71730-5836, Tel. (870) 813-7600.

 


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The information in this prospectus is not complete and may be changed. We may not sell these securities until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities and we are not soliciting offers to buy these securities in any state where the offer or sale is not permitted.

 

PROSPECTUS (SUBJECT TO COMPLETION DATED March 21, 2014)

Murphy Oil USA, Inc.

Offer to Exchange

6.000% Senior Notes due 2023

for

New 6.000% Senior Notes Due 2023

Guaranteed by Murphy USA Inc. and certain subsidiaries of Murphy USA Inc.

We are offering to exchange up to $500,000,000 of our new 6.000% Senior Notes due 2023 (the “new notes”) for up to $500,000,000 of our existing 6.000% Senior Notes due 2023 (the “old notes”). The terms of the new notes are identical in all material respects to the terms of the old notes, except that the new notes have been registered under the Securities Act, and the transfer restrictions and registration rights relating to the old notes do not apply to the new notes. The old notes are, and the new notes will be, fully and unconditionally guaranteed by Murphy USA Inc. and by certain of its 100% subsidiaries, on a joint and several basis, subject to customary release provisions in respect of the subsidiary guarantees as set forth in the indenture.

To exchange your old notes for new notes:

 

    you are required to make the representations described on page 147 to us;

 

    you must contact a Depository Trust Company (“DTC”) participant to complete the book-entry transfer procedures described herein to exchange your old notes for new notes, or otherwise complete and send the letter of transmittal that accompanies this prospectus to the exchange agent, U.S. Bank National Association, by the end of the day, at midnight, New York time, on                     , 2014; and

 

    you should read the section called “The Exchange Offer” for further information on how to exchange your old notes for new notes.

 

 

See “Risk Factors” beginning on page 8 for a discussion of risk factors that should be considered by you prior to tendering your old notes in the exchange offer.

Neither the Securities and Exchange Commission nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of the securities to be issued in the exchange offer or passed upon the adequacy or accuracy of this prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

                    , 2014


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Table of Contents

 

 

 

Non-GAAP Financial Measures

     iii   

Industry Data

     iii   

Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

     iv   

Notice to New Hampshire Residents

     iv   

Summary

     1   

Risk Factors

     8   

Use of Proceeds

     25   

Ratio of Earnings to Fixed Charges

     26   

Selected Consolidated and Combined Financial Data

     27   

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

     28   

Business

     47   

Management

     58   

Directors

     59   

Executive Compensation

     62   

Description of the Exchange Notes

     85   

Certain Relationships and Related Party Transactions

     138   

Principal Stockholders

     139   

The Exchange Offer

     141   

Material United States Tax Consequences of the Exchange Offer

     148   

Plan of Distribution

     149   

Validity of Securities

     150   

Experts

     150   

Where You Can Find More Information

     150   

Index to Consolidated and Combined Financial Statements

     F-1   

 

 

Our headquarters are located at 200 Peach Street, El Dorado, Arkansas 71730-5836 and our general telephone number is (870) 875-7600. Our Internet website is www.murphyusa.com. Our website and the information contained on that site, or connected to that site, are not incorporated by reference into this prospectus or the registration statement of which it forms a part.

 

 

As used in this prospectus (except as otherwise provided herein or unless the context otherwise requires):

 

    References to “we,” “us,” “our,” the “Company” and “Murphy USA,” unless the context requires otherwise, and except under the heading “Description of the Exchange Notes,” are to Murphy USA Inc. and its consolidated subsidiaries. Where appropriate in context, the foregoing terms also refer to Murphy Oil Corporation’s U.S. retail marketing business (as defined below) prior to completion of the Separation (as defined below).

 

    References to “Murphy Oil USA” and the “Issuer” are to Murphy Oil USA, Inc., the issuer of the notes, which is the primary operating subsidiary of our U.S. retail marketing business and which became a wholly owned subsidiary of Murphy USA Inc. upon completion of the Separation.

 

    References to “Holdings” are to Murphy USA Inc., the parent company of the Issuer and a guarantor of the notes, and not to any of its subsidiaries.

 

   

References to the “U.S. retail marketing business” are to our U.S. retail fueling and related merchandise marketing operations, together with product supply, wholesale and ethanol assets. The term “U.S. retail marketing business” does not include any liabilities arising out of refineries and related facilities previously

 

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owned by Murphy Oil Corporation through its subsidiaries, which liabilities have been retained by Murphy Oil Corporation but are accounted for as discontinued operations in the combined financial statements of Murphy USA included elsewhere in this prospectus.

 

    References to the “Separation” are to the separation of the U.S. retail marketing business from Murphy Oil Corporation, which was effected on August 30, 2013 by the contribution of all of the shares of capital stock of Murphy Oil USA to Holdings, in consideration for shares of Murphy USA common stock distributed in the Distribution (as defined below), following which Murphy USA became an independent, publicly traded company.

 

    References to the “Distribution” are to the distribution of all of the outstanding shares of Murphy USA Inc. common stock to stockholders of Murphy Oil Corporation as of the applicable record date.

 

    References to “Murphy Oil Corporation” and “Murphy Oil” refer to Murphy Oil Corporation, the entity that owned Murphy USA prior to the Separation and after the Separation became a separately traded public company consisting primarily of Murphy Oil Corporation’s exploration and production operations.

 

    References to the “notes” refer to the old notes and/or the new notes, as applicable, and includes the related guarantees, except where the context otherwise requires.

 

    References to the “guarantors” are to Murphy USA and those subsidiaries of Murphy USA that guarantee the notes.

 

 

This prospectus includes trademarks of Murphy Oil Corporation, Murphy USA and other persons. All trademarks or trade names referred to in this prospectus are the property of their respective owners.

 

 

About this Prospectus

We have not authorized anyone to provide any information other than that contained in this prospectus or in any free writing prospectus prepared by or on behalf of us or to which we have referred you. We take no responsibility for, and can provide no assurance as to the reliability of, any other information that others may give you. The Issuer is offering the notes for exchange only in jurisdictions where such offers are permitted. The information contained in this prospectus is accurate only as of the date of this prospectus, regardless of the time of delivery of this prospectus or of the exchange of the notes offered hereby.

You may also obtain this information without charge by writing or telephoning us at the following address and telephone number:

Murphy USA Inc.

200 Peach Street El Dorado, AR 71730-5836

Attention: Corporate Secretary

(870) 875-7600

If you would like to request copies of these documents, please do so by                 , 2014 (which is five business days before the scheduled expiration of the exchange offer) in order to receive them before the expiration of the exchange offer.

 

 

 

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NON-GAAP FINANCIAL MEASURES

This prospectus contains the following financial measures that are not calculated in accordance with GAAP:

EBITDA means net income (loss) plus net interest expense, plus income tax expense, depreciation and amortization, and Adjusted EBITDA adds back (i) other non-cash items (e.g., impairment of properties and accretion of asset retirement obligations) and (ii) other items that management does not consider to be meaningful in assessing our operating performance (e.g., (income) from discontinued operations, gain (loss) on sale of assets and other non-operating expense (income)). EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA are not measures that are prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP).

Reconciliations of Adjusted EBITDA to net income (loss) and comprehensive income (loss) are provided under “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in this prospectus.

We use EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA in our operational and financial decision-making, believing that such measures are useful to eliminate certain items in order to focus on what we deem to be a more reliable indicator of ongoing operating performance and our ability to generate cash flow from operations. Adjusted EBITDA is also used by many of our investors, research analysts, investment bankers, and lenders to assess our operating performance. However, non-GAAP financial measures are not a substitute for GAAP disclosures, and Adjusted EBITDA may be prepared differently by us than by other companies using similarly titled non-GAAP measures.

The Company also considers Free Cash Flow in the operation of its business. Free cash flow is defined as net cash provided by operating activities in a period minus payments for property and equipment made in that period. Free cash flow is also considered a non-GAAP financial measure. Management believes, however, that free cash flow, which measures our ability to generate additional cash from our business operations, is an important financial measure for us in evaluating the Company’s performance. Free cash flow should be considered in addition to, rather than as a substitute for consolidated net income as a measure of our performance and net cash provided by operating activities as a measure of our liquidity.

Numerous methods may exist to calculate a company’s free cash flow. As a result, the method used by our management to calculate our free cash flow may differ from the methods other companies use to calculate their free cash flow.

Reconciliations of Free Cash Flow to net cash provided by operating activities, which we believe to be the GAAP financial measure most directly comparable to free cash flow, are provided under “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in this prospectus.

INDUSTRY DATA

Certain industry, market and other similar data contained in this prospectus are based on our management’s own estimates, independent industry publications, including a report by the National Association of Convenience Stores, reports by market research firms or other published independent sources, and our management believes that its estimates are reasonable and that these other sources are reliable. However, industry and market data is subject to change and cannot always be verified with certainty due to limits on the availability and reliability of raw data, the voluntary nature of the data gathering process and other limitations and uncertainties inherent in any statistical survey. Our internal estimates have not been verified by any independent source, and we have not independently verified any third party information nor have we ascertained the underlying economic assumptions relied upon in those sources. While we are not aware of any misstatements regarding our market, industry or similar data presented herein, such data involve risks and uncertainties and are subject to change based on various factors, including those discussed under the headings “Cautionary Statements Regarding Forward-looking Statements” and “Risk Factors” in this prospectus.

 

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CAUTIONARY STATEMENT REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This prospectus contains “forward-looking statements.” These statements express management’s current views concerning future events or results, including without limitation our anticipated growth strategy, particularly with respect to our Walmart relationship and plans to build additional sites, and our ability to generate revenues, including through the sale of RINs, which are subject to inherent risks and uncertainties. Factors that could cause one or more of these forecasted events not to occur include, but are not limited to, a deterioration in the business or prospects of the U.S. retail marketing business, adverse developments in the U.S. retail marketing business’s markets or adverse developments in the U.S. or global capital markets, credit markets or economies generally the volatility and level of crude oil, corn and other commodity prices, the volatility and level of gasoline prices, customer demand for our products, disruptions in our relationship with Walmart, political and regulatory developments that may be adverse to us, and uncontrollable natural hazards or any of the other factors set forth under the caption “Risk Factors” in this prospectus. As a result you should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements. If any of the forecasted events does not occur for any reason, our business, results of operation, cash flows and/or financial condition may be materially adversely affected.

NOTICE TO NEW HAMPSHIRE RESIDENTS

NEITHER THE FACT THAT A REGISTRATION STATEMENT, OR AN APPLICATION FOR A LICENSE HAS BEEN FILED UNDER CHAPTER 421-B OF THE NEW HAMPSHIRE REVISED STATUTES (“RSA 421-B”) WITH THE STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE NOR THE FACT THAT A SECURITY IS EFFECTIVELY REGISTERED OR A PERSON IS LICENSED IN THE STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE CONSTITUTES A FINDING BY THE SECRETARY OF STATE OF THE STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE THAT ANY DOCUMENT FILED UNDER RSA 421-B IS TRUE, COMPLETE AND NOT MISLEADING. NEITHER ANY SUCH FACT NOR THE FACT THAT AN EXEMPTION OR EXCEPTION IS AVAILABLE FOR A SECURITY OR A TRANSACTION MEANS THAT THE SECRETARY OF STATE OF THE STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE HAS PASSED IN ANY WAY UPON THE MERITS OR QUALIFICATIONS OF, OR RECOMMENDED OR GIVEN APPROVAL TO, ANY PERSON, SECURITY, OR TRANSACTION. IT IS UNLAWFUL TO MAKE, OR CAUSE TO BE MADE, TO ANY PROSPECTIVE PURCHASER, CUSTOMER, OR CLIENT ANY REPRESENTATION INCONSISTENT WITH THE PROVISIONS OF THIS PARAGRAPH.

 

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SUMMARY

This summary highlights selected information in this prospectus, but it may not contain all of the information that is important to you. For a more complete description of this exchange offer, the notes and our company, you should read the entire prospectus carefully, including the “Risk Factors” and the “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” sections and the financial statements included in this prospectus.

OUR COMPANY

Our business consists primarily of marketing of retail motor fuel products and convenience merchandise through a large chain of 1,203 (as of December 31, 2013) retail stations operated by us, almost all of which are in close proximity to Walmart stores. Our retail stations are located in 23 states, primarily in the Southwest, Southeast and Midwest United States. Of these stations, 1,021 are branded Murphy USA and 182 are standalone Murphy Express locations (as of December 31, 2013). Our business also includes certain product supply and wholesale assets, including product distribution terminals and pipeline positions. As an independent publicly traded company, we believe we are a low-price, high volume fuel retailer selling convenience merchandise through low cost locations with key strategic relationships and experienced management.

Our headquarters are located at 200 Peach Street, El Dorado, Arkansas 71730-5836 and our general telephone number is (870) 875-7600. Our Internet website is www.murphyusa.com. Our website and the information contained on that site, or connected to that site, are not incorporated by reference into this prospectus or the registration statement of which it forms a part.

 

 

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THE EXCHANGE OFFER

 

Securities Offered

We are offering up to $500,000,000 aggregate principal amount of 6.000% Senior Notes due 2023, which have been registered under the Securities Act.

 

The Exchange Offer

We are offering to issue the new notes in exchange for a like principal amount of your old notes. We are offering to issue the new notes to satisfy our obligations contained in the registration rights agreement entered into when the old notes were sold in transactions permitted by Rule 144A under the Securities Act and therefore not registered with the SEC. For procedures for tendering, see “The Exchange Offer.”

 

Tenders, Expiration Date, Withdrawal

The exchange offer will expire at the end of the day, at midnight New York City time on                 , 2014 unless it is extended. If you decide to exchange your old notes for new notes, you must acknowledge that you are not engaging in, and do not intend to engage in, a distribution of the new notes. If you decide to tender your old notes in the exchange offer, you may withdraw them at any time prior to                 , 2014. If we decide for any reason not to accept any old notes for exchange, your old notes will be returned to you without expense to you promptly after the exchange offer expires.

 

Federal Income Tax Consequences

Your exchange of old notes for new notes in the exchange offer will not result in any income, gain or loss to you for U.S. federal income tax purposes. See “Material United States Federal Income Tax Consequences of the Exchange Offer.”

 

Use of Proceeds

We will not receive any proceeds from the issuance of the new notes in the exchange offer.

 

Exchange Agent

U.S. Bank National Association is the exchange agent for the exchange offer.

 

Failure to Tender Your Old Notes

If you fail to tender your old notes in the exchange offer, you will not have any further rights under the registration rights agreement, including any right to require us to register your old notes or to pay you additional interest.

You will be able to resell the new notes without registering them with the SEC if you meet the requirements described below.

Based on interpretations by the SEC’s staff in no-action letters issued to third parties, we believe that new notes issued in exchange for old notes in the exchange offer may be offered for resale, resold or otherwise transferred by you without registering the new notes under the Securities Act or delivering a prospectus, unless you are a broker-dealer receiving securities for your own account, so long as:

 

    you are not one of our “affiliates,” which is defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act;

 

    you acquire the new notes in the ordinary course of your business;

 

 

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    you do not have any arrangement or understanding with any person to participate in the distribution of the new notes; and

 

    you are not engaged in, and do not intend to engage in, a distribution of the new notes.

If you are an affiliate of ours, or you are engaged in, intend to engage in or have any arrangement or understanding with respect to, the distribution of new notes acquired in the exchange offer, you (1) should not rely on our interpretations of the position of the SEC’s staff and (2) must comply with the registration and prospectus delivery requirements of the Securities Act in connection with any resale transaction.

If you are a broker-dealer and receive new notes for your own account in the exchange offer:

 

    you must represent that you do not have any arrangement with us or any of our affiliates to distribute the new notes;

 

    you must acknowledge that you will deliver a prospectus in connection with any resale of the new notes you receive from us in the exchange offer; the letter of transmittal states that by so acknowledging and by delivering a prospectus, you will not be deemed to admit that you are an “underwriter” within the meaning of the Securities Act; and

 

    you may use this prospectus, as it may be amended or supplemented from time to time, in connection with the resale of new notes received in exchange for old notes acquired by you as a result of market-making or other trading activities.

For a period of 90 days after the expiration of the exchange offer, we will make this prospectus available to any participating broker-dealer for use in connection with any resale described above.

 

 

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SUMMARY DESCRIPTION OF THE EXCHANGE NOTES

The terms of the new notes and the old notes are identical in all material respects, except that the new notes have been registered under the Securities Act, and the transfer restrictions and registrations rights relating to the old notes, do not apply to the new notes.

 

Issuer

Murphy Oil USA, Inc.

 

Notes

$500 million aggregate principal amount of 6.000% Senior Notes due 2023.

 

Maturity Date

The notes will mature on August 15, 2023.

 

Interest

Interest on the notes is payable semi-annually in arrears on February 15 and August 15 of each year.

 

Guarantees

The notes will be guaranteed, fully and unconditionally on a senior unsecured basis by Murphy USA and each of Murphy USA’s 100% owned U.S. subsidiaries that is or becomes a guarantor or borrower under Murphy Oil USA’s credit facilities (other than the Issuer), on a joint and several basis, subject to customary release provisions in respect of the subsidiary guarantees as set forth in the indenture.

 

  The guarantee of a guarantor (other than that of Murphy USA) may terminate under certain circumstances, including if such guarantor is released from its guarantee and is not a borrower under the credit facilities (including during any Suspension Period upon obtaining an investment grade rating).

 

  Neither Murphy Oil Corporation nor its subsidiaries is a guarantor or obligor (contingent or otherwise) with respect to the notes.

 

Unrestricted Subsidiaries

The Ethanol Subsidiaries are what we refer to as unrestricted subsidiaries. An unrestricted subsidiary will not be:

 

    a guarantor of the notes; or

 

    subject to the restrictive covenants of the Indenture.

 

  We will also be able to sell the assets or capital stock of an unrestricted subsidiary without restriction and will be allowed to dividend or distribute the proceeds of these sales on terms and subject to the conditions in the Indenture. Under circumstances specified in the Indenture, we will be able to designate other subsidiaries as unrestricted subsidiaries.

 

 

For information regarding the assets, outstanding third-party liabilities, revenues and net income of our unrestricted subsidiaries (which are the same as our non-guarantor subsidiaries), see “Description of the Exchange Notes—Unrestricted Subsidiaries” and

 

 

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disclosures included in Note 21 of our 2013 audited consolidated and combined financial statements included in this prospectus.

 

Ranking

The notes are Murphy Oil USA’s senior unsecured indebtedness and rank equally with all of its existing and future senior unsecured indebtedness and effectively junior to its existing and future secured indebtedness (including indebtedness with respect to the credit facilities) to the extent of the value of the assets securing such indebtedness.

 

  The guarantees are the senior unsecured indebtedness of each guarantor and rank equally with all of such guarantor’s existing and future senior unsecured indebtedness and effectively junior to such guarantor’s existing and future secured indebtedness to the extent of the value of the assets securing such indebtedness.

 

  The notes would be structurally subordinated to all of the existing and future third-party liabilities, including trade payables, of our existing and future subsidiaries that do not guarantee the notes.

 

  At December 31, 2013, the Issuer and the guarantors had approximately $570 million aggregate principal amount of total indebtedness outstanding (which includes $500 million of the notes offered for exchange hereby). In addition, the Issuer and the guarantors together had approximately $450 million available for borrowing (subject to periodic borrowing base limitations) as additional senior secured debt under the credit facilities (without giving effect to the $200 million uncommitted incremental facility).

 

  At December 31, 2013, Murphy Oil USA’s non-guarantor subsidiaries had approximately $4.1 million of outstanding liabilities to third parties (which excludes intercompany indebtedness but includes trade payables), all of which would rank structurally senior to the notes.

 

  In addition, for the year ended December 31, 2013, Murphy Oil USA’s non-guarantor subsidiaries generated approximately $269.3 million, or 1.5%, of our revenues. These non-guarantor subsidiaries had $80.9 million of net income for the same period which included income from discontinued operations of $78.7 million. Included in the discontinued operations was a gain on the sale of the Hankinson facility of $52.5 million.

 

  See “Description of the Exchange Notes—Ranking.”

 

Optional Redemption

On and after August 15, 2018, we may redeem all or a portion of the notes at the redemption prices (expressed in percentages of principal amount on the redemption date) set forth under “Description of the Exchange Notes—Optional Redemption,” plus accrued and unpaid interest to the date of redemption.

 

 

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  At any time prior to August 15, 2018, we may redeem all or a portion of the notes at a “make whole” redemption price set forth under “Description of the Exchange Notes—Optional Redemption,” plus accrued and unpaid interest to the date of redemption.

 

  In addition, at any time prior to August 15, 2016, we may, on any one or more occasions, redeem up to 35% of the aggregate principal amount of the notes at a redemption price equal to 106% of the principal amount of the notes redeemed, plus accrued and unpaid interest to the redemption date, with the net cash proceeds of certain equity offerings if at least 65% of the aggregate principal amount of the notes remains outstanding immediately after such redemption and the redemption occurs within 90 days of the date of such equity offering. See “Description of the Exchange Notes—Optional Redemption.”

 

Certain Covenants

The Indenture contains covenants that limit, among other things, our ability and the ability of our Restricted Subsidiaries to:

 

    incur, assume or guarantee additional indebtedness;

 

    make certain investments or pay dividends or distributions on our capital stock or purchase, redeem or retire capital stock or make certain other restricted payments;

 

    sell assets, including capital stock of the restricted subsidiaries;

 

    restrict dividends or other payments by restricted subsidiaries;

 

    create liens or use assets as security in other transactions;

 

    enter into transactions with affiliates; and

 

    enter into mergers and consolidations, or sell, convey, transfer, lease or otherwise dispose of all or substantially all of our property and assets.

 

  These covenants are subject to important qualifications and limitations, and include exceptions to allow for strategic alternatives related to the Ethanol Assets. See “Description of the Exchange Notes—Certain Covenants.” In addition, most of the covenants will be suspended during any period when both Standard & Poor’s and Moody’s assign the notes an investment grade rating and no Default has occurred and is continuing under the Indenture. See “Description of the Exchange Notes—Certain Covenants.”

 

Change of Control

If a Change of Control occurs, unless we have earlier exercised our right of redemption, holders of the notes will have the right to require us to repurchase the notes at a repurchase price equal to 101% of the principal amount thereof plus accrued and unpaid interest, if any, to the date of purchase. See “Description of the Exchange Notes—Change of Control.”

 

 

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Asset sales

If we sell certain assets (other than the Ethanol Assets and subject to certain other exceptions) and do not repay certain debt or reinvest the proceeds of such sales within certain time periods, we must offer to repurchase the notes at 100% of their principal amount plus accrued and unpaid interest to the date of repurchase. For more details, see the section “Description of the Exchange Notes—Certain Covenants—Limitation on Sales of Assets and Subsidiary Stock.”

 

Denomination, Form and Registration of Notes

The new notes will be issued in fully registered form and only in denominations of $2,000 and integral multiples of $1,000 in excess thereof. The new notes will be issued initially as global notes. DTC will act as depositary for the notes. Except in limited circumstances, global notes will not be exchangeable for certificated notes.

 

Trustee

U.S. Bank National Association

 

Exchange Agent

U.S. Bank National Association

 

Governing Law

The Indenture and the notes are governed by the laws of the State of New York.

 

Risk Factors

You should carefully consider all of the information contained in this prospectus before deciding to tender your old notes in the exchange offer. In particular, we urge you to carefully consider the information set forth under “Risk Factors” herein for a discussion of risks and uncertainties relating to us, our business and the new notes offered hereby.

 

 

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RISK FACTORS

Risks Relating to our Company

We have limited history operating as an independent public company. We incurred significant costs to create the corporate infrastructure necessary to operate as an independent public company, and we may experience increased ongoing costs in connection with being an independent public company compared to our history prior to the Separation.

We have historically used Murphy Oil’s corporate infrastructure to support our business functions, including information technology systems. The expenses related to establishing and maintaining this infrastructure were spread among all of Murphy Oil’s businesses. Following the Separation, we have only had access to Murphy Oil infrastructure through a Transition Services Agreement between us and Murphy Oil, and we have had to build out and maintain our own infrastructure during this transition period, which has required us to incur significant costs. Following the expiration of the Transition Services Agreement, we will no longer have access to any of Murphy Oil’s infrastructure on a contractual basis. The Transition Services Agreement is expected to expire 18 months after the Separation, subject to a possible 6-month extension.

In particular, prior to the Separation, Murphy Oil performed many important corporate functions for us, including some treasury and payroll, tax administration and compliance, human resources, compensation and benefits, legal and other services. Following the Separation, Murphy Oil has continued to provide some of these services to us on a transitional basis pursuant to the Transition Services Agreement. Murphy Oil may not successfully execute all these functions during the transition period or we may have to expend additional efforts or costs in excess of those estimated under the Transition Services Agreement. Any interruption in these services could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operation and cash flows. By the end of the transition period, we will need to perform all of these functions ourselves or hire third parties to perform these functions on our behalf. The additional costs we may incur associated with performing or outsourcing these functions may exceed the amounts reflected in our historical consolidated and combined financial statements or that we have agreed to pay Murphy Oil during the transition period. A significant increase in the costs of performing or outsourcing these functions could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Since August 30, 2013, we have been directly subject to reporting and other obligations under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and we expect to be compliant with the applicable requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 for the year ended December 31, 2014. This will require annual management assessments of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting and a report by our independent registered public accounting firm addressing the effectiveness of these controls. These reporting and other obligations will place significant demands on our management and our administrative and operational resources, including accounting resources.

In connection with our Separation from Murphy Oil, Murphy Oil has agreed to indemnify us for certain liabilities and we have agreed to indemnify Murphy Oil for certain liabilities. If we are required to act under these indemnities to Murphy Oil, we may need to divert cash to meet those obligations and our financial results could be negatively impacted. The Murphy Oil indemnity may not be sufficient to insure us against the full amount of liabilities for which it will be allocated responsibility, and Murphy Oil may not be able to satisfy its indemnification obligations to us in the future.

Pursuant to the Separation and Distribution Agreement and certain other agreements with Murphy Oil, Murphy Oil has agreed to indemnify us for certain liabilities, and we have agreed to indemnify Murphy Oil for certain liabilities. Indemnities that we may be required to provide Murphy Oil are not subject to any cap, may be significant and could negatively impact our business, particularly indemnities relating to our actions that could impact the tax-free nature of the distribution. Third parties could also seek to hold us responsible for any of the

 

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liabilities that Murphy Oil has agreed to retain, and under certain circumstances, we may be subject to continuing contingent liabilities of Murphy Oil following the Separation. Further, Murphy Oil may not be able to fully satisfy its indemnification obligations. Moreover, even if we ultimately succeed in recovering from Murphy Oil any amounts for which we are held liable, we may be temporarily required to bear these losses ourselves. Each of these risks could negatively affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Our operations present hazards and risks, which may not be fully covered by insurance, if insured. If a significant accident or event occurs for which we are not adequately insured, our operations and financial results could be adversely affected.

The scope and nature of our operations present a variety of operational hazards and risks, including explosions, fires, toxic emissions, and natural catastrophes that must be managed through continual oversight and control. These and other risks are present throughout our operations. As protection against these hazards and risks, we maintain insurance against many, but not all, potential losses or liabilities arising from such risks. Uninsured losses and liabilities arising from operating risks could reduce the funds available to us for capital and investment spending and could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

We have debt obligations that could restrict our business and adversely impact our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows; our leverage could increase the overall cost of debt funding and decrease the overall debt capacity and commercial credit available to us in the future.

In connection with the Separation, we borrowed $650 million of new debt, used in part to fund a cash dividend to Murphy Oil immediately prior to the Separation. This level of debt could have significant consequences to our future operations, including:

 

    making it more difficult for us to meet our payment and other obligations under our outstanding debt;

 

    resulting in an event of default if we fail to comply with the financial and other restrictive covenants contained in our debt agreements, which event of default could result in all of our debt becoming immediately due and payable;

 

    reducing the availability of our cash flow to fund working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions and other general corporate purposes, and limiting our ability to obtain additional financing for these purposes;

 

    limiting our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, and increasing our vulnerability to, changes in our business, the industry in which we operate and the general economy; and

 

    placing us at a competitive disadvantage compared to our competitors that have less debt or are less leveraged.

Any of the above-listed factors could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

In addition, our credit facilities and the indenture that governs the notes include restrictive covenants that, subject to certain exceptions and qualifications, restrict or limit our ability and the ability of our restricted subsidiaries to, among other things, incur additional indebtedness, pay dividends, make certain investments, sell certain assets and enter into certain strategic transactions, including mergers and acquisitions. These covenants and restrictions could affect our ability to operate our business, and may limit our ability to react to market conditions or take advantage of potential business opportunities as they arise.

Our leverage may increase the overall cost of debt funding and decrease the overall debt capacity and commercial credit available to us. We have below investment-grade ratings from Moody’s and S&P based on our

 

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current capital structure. Our credit ratings could be lowered or withdrawn entirely by a ratings agency if, in its judgment, the circumstances warrant. If our existing ratings are lowered, or otherwise we do not obtain an investment grade rating in the future, or if we do and a rating agency were to downgrade us again to below investment grade, our borrowing costs would increase and our funding sources could decrease. Actual or anticipated changes or downgrades in our ratings, including any announcement that our ratings are under review for a downgrade, could adversely affect our business, cash flows, financial condition and operating results.

If the distribution from Murphy Oil, together with certain related transactions, does not qualify as a transaction that is generally tax-free for U.S. federal income tax purposes, shareholders and Murphy Oil could be subject to significant tax liability and, in certain circumstances, we could be required to indemnify Murphy Oil for material taxes pursuant to indemnification obligations under the Tax Matters Agreement entered into in connection with the Separation.

Murphy Oil has received a private letter ruling from the IRS substantially to the effect that, among other things, the distribution, together with certain related transactions, will qualify as a transaction that is generally tax-free to Murphy Oil and its stockholders for U.S. federal income tax purposes, and has also received a tax opinion from Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP, counsel to Murphy Oil, to substantially the same effect. The private letter ruling and the tax opinion does rely on certain representations, assumptions and undertakings, including those relating to the past and future conduct of our business, and neither the private letter ruling nor the opinion would be valid if such representations, assumptions and undertakings were incorrect. Moreover, the private letter ruling does not address all the issues that are relevant to determining whether the distribution will qualify for tax-free treatment. Notwithstanding the private letter ruling and the tax opinion, the IRS could determine the distribution should be treated as a taxable transaction for U.S. federal income tax purposes if it determines any of the representations, assumptions or undertakings that were included in the request for the private letter ruling are false or have been violated or if it disagrees with the conclusions in the opinion that are not covered by the IRS ruling.

If the distribution fails to qualify for tax-free treatment, in general, Murphy Oil would be subject to tax as if it had sold the Murphy USA common stock in a taxable sale for its fair market value, and Murphy Oil stockholders who received shares of Murphy USA common stock in the distribution would be subject to tax as if they had received a taxable distribution equal to the fair market value of such shares. In connection with the distribution, we and Murphy Oil entered into a Tax Matters Agreement that governs our rights and obligations with respect to our respective tax liabilities. Generally, we and Murphy Oil will indemnify each other for taxes attributable to our respective operations, and we will indemnify Murphy Oil from the failure of the distribution to qualify as a distribution under Section 355 of the Code as a result of a breach of certain representations or covenants by us. If we are required to indemnify Murphy Oil under the circumstances set forth in the Tax Matters Agreement, we may be subject to substantial liabilities.

We may not be able to engage in desirable strategic or capital-raising transactions following the Separation. In addition, under some circumstances, we could be liable for adverse tax consequences resulting from engaging in significant strategic or capital-raising transactions.

In the absence of a supplemental private letter ruling from the IRS or an unqualified opinion from a nationally recognized tax advisor, for the two-year period following the distribution (which was completed on August 30, 2013), we would be prohibited from carrying out a number of transactions that may otherwise be desirable, including:

 

    engaging in any transaction involving a merger, consolidation or other reorganization involving shares of our stock;

 

    entering into transactions which would result in one or more persons acquiring stock representing a 40% or greater interest in us;

 

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    disposing of assets used in the U.S. marketing business (other than our ethanol assets or other asset sales in the ordinary course of business);

 

    discontinuing the U.S. marketing business or dissolving or liquidating; and

 

    repurchasing shares of our common stock, other than pursuant to open-market purchases to further legitimate business purposes.

These restrictions may limit our ability to pursue strategic transactions or engage in new business or other transactions that may maximize the value of our business.

Risks Relating to Our Business

Volatility in the global prices of oil and petroleum products and general economic conditions that are largely out of our control, as well as seasonal variations in fuel pricing, can significantly affect our operating results.

Our net income is significantly affected by changes in the margins on retail and wholesale gasoline marketing operations. Oil and domestic wholesale gasoline markets are volatile. General political conditions, acts of war or terrorism, instability in oil producing regions, particularly in the Middle East and South America, and the value of U.S. dollars relative to other foreign currencies, particularly those of oil producing nations, could significantly affect oil supplies and wholesale gasoline costs. In addition, the supply of gasoline and our wholesale purchase costs could be adversely affected in the event of a shortage, which could result from, among other things, lack of capacity at oil refineries, sustained increase in global demand or the fact that our gasoline contracts do not guarantee an uninterrupted, unlimited supply of gasoline. Our wholesale purchase costs could also be adversely affected by increasingly stringent regulations regarding the content and characteristics of fuel products. Significant increases and volatility in wholesale gasoline costs could result in lower gasoline gross margins per gallon. This volatility makes it extremely difficult to predict the effect that future wholesale cost fluctuations will have on our operating results and financial condition in future periods.

Except in limited cases, we typically do not seek to hedge any significant portion of our exposure to the effects of changing prices of crude oil and refined products. Dramatic increases in oil prices reduce retail gasoline gross margins, because wholesale gasoline costs typically increase faster than retailers are able to pass them along to customers. We purchase refined products, particularly gasoline, needed to supply our U.S. retail marketing stations. Therefore, our most significant costs are subject to volatility of prices for these commodities. Our ability to successfully manage operating costs is important because we have little or no influence on the sales prices or regional and worldwide consumer demand for oil and gasoline. Furthermore, oil prices, wholesale motor fuel costs, motor fuel sales volumes, motor fuel gross margins and merchandise sales can be subject to seasonal fluctuations. For example, consumer demand for motor fuel typically increases during the summer driving season, and typically falls during the winter months. Travel, recreation and construction are typically higher in these months in the geographic areas in which we operate, increasing the demand for motor fuel and merchandise that we sell. Therefore, our revenues and/or sales volumes are typically higher in the second and third quarters of our fiscal year. A significant change in any of these factors, including a significant decrease in consumer demand (other than typical seasonal variations), could materially affect our motor fuel and merchandise volumes, motor fuel gross profit and overall customer traffic, which in turn could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Further, recessionary economic conditions, higher interest rates, higher gasoline and other energy costs, inflation, increases in commodity prices, higher levels of unemployment, higher consumer debt levels, higher tax rates and other changes in tax laws or other economic factors may affect consumer spending or buying habits, and could adversely affect the demand for products we sell at our retail sites. Unfavorable economic conditions, higher gasoline prices and unemployment levels can affect consumer confidence, spending patterns and miles driven. These factors can lead to sales declines in both gasoline and general merchandise, and in turn have an adverse impact on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

 

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Our ability to continue to generate revenue and operating income depends on our continued relationship with Walmart.

At December 31, 2013, our 1,203 Company stations were almost all in close proximity to Walmart stores. Therefore, our relationship with Walmart, the continued goodwill of Walmart and the integrity of Walmart’s brand name in the retail marketplace are all important drivers for our business. Any deterioration in our relationship with Walmart could have a material adverse effect on us, including limiting our future growth. In addition, our competitive posture could be weakened by negative changes at Walmart. Many of our Company stations benefit from customer traffic generated by Walmart retail stores, and if the customer traffic through these host stores decreases due to the economy or for any other reason, our sales could be materially and adversely affected.

In addition, on December 21, 2012, we entered into an agreement with Walmart to purchase approximately 200 properties for the development of additional retail fueling stations, which we expect to complete over the next few years. As a result, the foregoing risks impact our ability to achieve growth from these additional retail sites. We also rely upon Walmart’s cooperation with us in order to complete the purchases of these additional sites, and our agreement with Walmart requires us to obtain their approval of our development plans before we may purchase any properties from them. See “—Walmart retains certain rights in its agreements with us, which may adversely impact our ability to conduct our business” below. If our relationship with Walmart deteriorates or Walmart experiences a slowdown in customer traffic or reputational harm, we may not be successful in developing these additional retail sites, and as a result, our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows could be materially and adversely affected.

The current level of additional incremental revenue that is generated from RINs may not be sustainable.

Our revenues are impacted by our ability to generate revenues from activities such as blending bulk fuel with ethanol and bio-diesel to capture and subsequently sell Renewable Identification Numbers (“RINs”). The market price for RINs fluctuates based on a variety of factors, including but not limited to governmental and regulatory action and market dynamics. In recent historical periods, we have benefited by our ability to attain RINs and sell them at favorable prices in the market; however, during the latter part of 2013, we have observed RIN prices that were declining in value from values obtained earlier in the year. A significant decline in revenues from RINs in future periods could adversely affect our results of operations, and the impact could be material.

We are exposed to risks associated with the interruption of supply and increased costs as a result of our reliance on third-party supply and transportation of refined products.

We utilize key product supply and wholesale assets, including our pipeline positions and product distribution terminals, to supply our retail fueling stations. Much of our competitive advantage arises out of these proprietary arrangements which, if disrupted, could materially and adversely affect us. In addition to our own operational risks discussed above, we could experience interruptions of supply or increases in costs to deliver refined products to market if the ability of the pipelines or vessels to transport petroleum or refined products is disrupted because of weather events, accidents, governmental regulations or third-party actions. Furthermore, at some of our locations there are very few suppliers for fuel in that market.

Changes in credit card expenses could reduce our gross margin, especially on gasoline.

A significant portion of our retail sales involve payment using credit cards. We are assessed credit card fees as a percentage of transaction amounts and not as a fixed dollar amount or percentage of our gross margins. Higher gasoline prices result in higher credit card expenses, and an increase in credit card use or an increase in credit card fees would have a similar effect. Therefore, credit card fees charged on gasoline purchases that are more expensive as a result of higher gasoline prices are not necessarily accompanied by higher gross margins. In fact, such fees may cause lower gross margins. Lower gross margins on gasoline sales caused by higher credit card fees may decrease our overall gross margin and could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

 

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Walmart retains certain rights in its agreements with us, which may adversely impact our ability to conduct our business.

In recent years, we have purchased from Walmart the properties underlying 914 of our Company stations. Our December 21, 2012 agreement with Walmart provides for the potential purchase of approximately 200 additional sites. Our agreement requires us to obtain Walmart’s approval of our development plans and to indemnify Walmart for certain environmental liabilities. In addition, Walmart has the right to terminate the agreement with respect to certain properties located adjacent to Walmart stores if the sale of any such property to us would result in certain claims or liabilities against Walmart or, in Walmart’s sole discretion, would impair the operation of the related Walmart store. Although we expect to build approximately 200 sites over the next few years, to date, Walmart has terminated the agreement with respect to a few of the properties under the agreement. If we are unable to obtain Walmart’s approval or Walmart terminates the agreement with respect to additional properties, or we are unable to obtain site development permits, we may develop fewer sites than we currently anticipate, and the development of these sites may take longer than we anticipate or may not occur at all. As a result, we can provide no assurance as to the number of sites contemplated by the agreement that we will develop. The failure to develop these sites as currently contemplated for any reason could materially impact our forecasted growth.

In addition, our owned properties that were purchased from Walmart are subject to Easements with Covenants and Restrictions Affecting Land (the “ECRs”) between us and Walmart. The ECRs impose customary restrictions on the use of our properties, which Walmart has the right to enforce. The ECRs also provide that if we propose to sell a fueling station property or any portion thereof (other than in connection with the sale of all or substantially all of our properties that were purchased from Walmart or in connection with a bona fide financing), Walmart has a right of first refusal to purchase such property or portion thereof on similar terms. Subject to certain exceptions (including a merger in which we participate, the transfer of any of our securities or a change in control of us), if we market for sale to a third party all or substantially all of our properties that were purchased from Walmart, or if we receive an unsolicited offer to purchase such properties that we intend to accept, we are required to notify Walmart. Walmart then has the right, within 90 days of receipt of such notice, to make an offer to purchase such properties. If Walmart makes such an offer, for a period of one year we will generally only be permitted to accept third-party offers where the net consideration to us would be greater than that offered by Walmart.

The ECRs also prohibit us from transferring all or substantially all of our fueling station properties that were purchased from Walmart to a “competitor” of Walmart, as reasonably determined by Walmart. The term “competitor” is generally defined in the ECRs as an entity that owns, operates or controls grocery stores or supermarkets, wholesale club operations similar to that of a Sam’s Club, discount department stores or other discount retailers similar to any of the various Walmart store prototypes or pharmacy or drug stores.

Similarly, some of our leased properties are subject to certain rights retained by Walmart. Our master lease agreement states that if Murphy Oil USA is acquired or becomes party to any merger or consolidation that results in a material change in the management of the stations, Walmart will have the option to purchase the stations at fair market value. The master lease also prohibits us from selling all or any portion of a station without first offering to sell all or such portion to Walmart on the same terms and conditions. These provisions may restrict our ability to conduct our business on the terms and in the manner we consider most favorable and may adversely affect our future growth.

We currently have one principal supplier for over 80% of our merchandise. A disruption in supply could have a material effect on our business.

Over 80% of our general merchandise, including most tobacco products and grocery items, is currently purchased from a single wholesale grocer, McLane Company, Inc. (“McLane”). We have a contract with McLane through September 2015, but we may not be able to renew the contract when it expires, or on similar

 

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terms. Alternative suppliers that we could use may not be immediately available. A disruption in supply could have a material effect on our business, cost of goods sold, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

We may be unable to protect or maintain our rights in the trademarks we use in our business.

We expect to use the Murphy USA® and Murphy Express trademarks under the Trademark License Agreement that we entered into with Murphy Oil, which will continue to own those trademarks. Murphy Oil’s actions and our actions to protect our rights in those trademarks may not be adequate to prevent others from using similar marks or otherwise violating our rights in those trademarks. Furthermore, our right to use those trademarks is limited to the marketing business and can be terminated by Murphy Oil upon the occurrence of certain events, such as our uncured material breach, insolvency or change of control.

Capital financing may not always be available to fund our activities.

We usually must spend and risk a significant amount of capital to fund our activities. Although most capital needs are funded from operating cash flow, the timing of cash flows from operations and capital funding needs may not always coincide, and the levels of cash flow may not fully cover capital funding requirements.

From time to time, we may need to supplement our cash generated from operations with proceeds from financing activities. In connection with the Separation, we entered into a credit facility to provide us with available financing for working capital and other general corporate purposes. This credit facility is intended to meet any ongoing cash needs in excess of internally generated cash flows. Uncertainty and illiquidity in financial markets may materially impact the ability of the participating financial institutions to fund their commitments to us under our credit facility. Accordingly, we may not be able to obtain the full amount of the funds available under our credit facility to satisfy our cash requirements, and our failure to do so could have a material adverse effect on our operations and financial position.

We could be adversely affected if we are not able to attract and retain highly qualified senior personnel.

We are dependent on our ability to attract and retain highly qualified senior personnel. If, for any reason, we are not able to attract and retain qualified senior personnel, our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows could be adversely affected.

We may be unsuccessful in executing any strategic alternatives that we may pursue for our remaining ethanol production facility.

To better focus the Company’s operations on its retail fuel business, we are currently considering strategic alternatives for our Hereford ethanol facility. As part of this effort, we are evaluating various factors, including the appropriate timing and market conditions. Although we will seek to maximize value in any transaction that we may pursue, we may be unsuccessful in achieving the financial and/or operational objectives of any such transaction. This risk may be exacerbated to the extent we pursue a strategic alternative under unfavorable industry and/or market conditions.

Risks Relating to Our Industry

We operate in a highly competitive industry, which could adversely affect us in many ways, including our profitability, our ability to grow, and our ability to manage our businesses.

We operate in the oil and gas industry and experience intense competition from other independent retail and wholesale gasoline marketing companies and ethanol producers. The U.S. marketing petroleum business is highly competitive, particularly with regard to accessing and marketing petroleum and other refined products.

 

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We compete with other chains of retail fuel stations for fuel supply and in the retail sale of refined products to end consumers, primarily on the basis of price, but also on the basis of convenience and consumer appeal. In addition, we may also face competition from other retail fueling stations that adopt marketing strategies similar to ours by associating with non-traditional retailers, such as supermarkets, discount club stores and hypermarkets, particularly in the geographic areas in which we operate. We expect that our industry will continue to trend toward this model, resulting in increased competition to us over time. Moreover, because we do not produce or refine any of the petroleum or other refined products that we market and Murphy Oil does not supply us with refined products, we compete with retail gasoline companies that have ongoing supply relationships with affiliates or former affiliates that manufacture refined products. We also compete with integrated companies that have their own production and/or refining operations that are at times able to offset losses from marketing operations with profits from producing or refining operations, and may be better positioned to withstand periods of depressed retail margins or supply shortages. In addition, we compete with other retail and wholesale gasoline marketing companies that have more extensive retail outlets and greater brand name recognition. Some of our competitors have been in existence longer than we have and have greater financial, marketing and other resources than we do. As a result, these competitors may have a greater ability to bear the economic risks inherent in all phases of our business and may be able to respond better to changes in the economy and new opportunities within the industry. Such competition could adversely affect us, including our profitability, our ability to grow and our ability to manage our business.

In addition, the retail gasoline industry in the United States is highly competitive due to ease of entry and constant change in the number and type of retailers offering similar products and services. With respect to merchandise, our retail sites compete with other convenience store chains, independently owned convenience stores, supermarkets, drugstores, discount clubs, gasoline service stations, mass merchants, fast food operations and other similar retail outlets. In recent years, several non-traditional retailers, including supermarkets, discount club stores and mass merchants, have begun to compete directly with retail gasoline sites. These non-traditional gasoline retailers have obtained a significant share of the gasoline market, and their market share is expected to grow, and these retailers may use promotional pricing or discounts, both at the fuel pump and in the convenience store, to encourage in-store merchandise sales and gasoline sales. In addition, some large retailers and supermarkets are adjusting their store layouts and product prices in an attempt to appeal to convenience store customers. Major competitive factors include: location, ease of access, product and service selection, gasoline brands, pricing, customer service, store appearance, cleanliness and safety. Competition from these retailers may reduce our market share and our revenues, and the resulting impact on our business and results of operations could be materially adverse.

Changes in consumer behavior and travel as a result of changing economic conditions, the development of alternative energy technologies or otherwise could affect our business.

In the retail gasoline industry, customer traffic is generally driven by consumer preferences and spending trends, growth rates for commercial truck traffic and trends in travel and weather. Changes in economic conditions generally, or in the regions in which we operate, could adversely affect consumer spending patterns and travel in our markets. In particular, weakening economic conditions may result in decreases in miles driven and discretionary consumer spending and travel, which affect spending on gasoline and convenience items. In addition, changes in the types of products and services demanded by consumers may adversely affect our merchandise sales and gross margin. Additionally, negative publicity or perception surrounding gasoline suppliers could adversely affect their reputation and brand image, which may negatively affect our gasoline sales and gross margin. Our success depends on our ability to anticipate and respond in a timely manner to changing consumer demands and preferences while continuing to sell products and services that remain relevant to the consumer and thus will positively impact overall retail gross margin.

Similarly, advanced technology, improved fuel efficiency and increased use of “green” automobiles (e.g., those automobiles that do not use gasoline or that are powered by hybrid engines) would reduce demand for gasoline. Developments regarding climate change and the effects of greenhouse gas emissions on climate change

 

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and the environment may lead to increased use of “green” automobiles. Consequently, attitudes toward gasoline and its relationship to the environment may significantly affect our sales and ability to market our products. Reduced consumer demand for gasoline could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Our operations and earnings have been and will continue to be affected by worldwide political developments.

Many governments, including those that are members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (“OPEC”), unilaterally intervene at times in the orderly market of petroleum and natural gas produced in their countries through such actions as setting prices, determining rates of production, and controlling who may buy and sell the production. In addition, prices and availability of petroleum, natural gas and refined products could be influenced by political unrest and by various governmental policies to restrict or increase petroleum usage and supply. Other governmental actions that could affect our operations and earnings include tax changes, royalty increases and regulations concerning: currency fluctuations, protection and remediation of the environment, concerns over the possibility of global warming being affected by human activity including the production and use of hydrocarbon energy, restraints and controls on imports and exports, safety, and relationships between employers and employees. As a retail gasoline marketing company, we are significantly affected by these factors. Because these and other factors are subject to changes caused by governmental and political considerations and are often made in response to changing internal and worldwide economic conditions and to actions of other governments or specific events, it is not practical to attempt to predict the effects of such factors on our future operations and earnings.

Our business is subject to operational hazards and risks normally associated with the marketing of petroleum products.

We operate in many different locations around the United States. The occurrence of an event, including but not limited to acts of nature such as hurricanes, floods, earthquakes and other forms of severe weather, and mechanical equipment failures, industrial accidents, fires, explosions, acts of war and intentional terrorist attacks could result in damage to our facilities, and the resulting interruption and loss of associated revenues; environmental pollution or contamination; and personal injury, including death, for which we could be deemed to be liable, and which could subject us to substantial fines and/or claims for punitive damages.

We store gasoline in storage tanks at our retail sites. Our operations are subject to significant hazards and risks inherent in storing gasoline. These hazards and risks include, but are not limited to, fires, explosions, spills, discharges and other releases, any of which could result in distribution difficulties and disruptions, environmental pollution, governmentally imposed fines or cleanup obligations, personal injury or wrongful death claims and other damage to our properties and the properties of others. Any such event could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Certain of our assets such as gasoline terminals and certain retail fueling stations lie near the U.S. coastline and are vulnerable to hurricane and tropical storm damages, which may result in shutdowns. The U.S. hurricane season runs from June through November, but the most severe storm activities usually occur in late summer, such as with Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005. Although we expect to maintain insurance for certain of these risks as described below, due to policy deductibles and possible coverage limits, weather-related risks are not fully insured.

We are subject to various environmental laws and regulations, which could expose us to significant expenditures, liabilities or obligations and reduce product demand.

We are subject to stringent federal, state and local environmental laws and regulations governing, among other things, the generation, storage, handling, use and transportation of petroleum products and hazardous

 

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materials; the emission and discharge of such substances into the environment; the content and characteristics of fuel products; the process safety of our facilities; and human health and safety. Pursuant to such environmental laws and regulations, we are also required to obtain permits from governmental authorities for certain of our operations. While we strive to abide by these requirements, we cannot assure you that we have been or will be at all times in compliance with such laws, regulations and permits. If we violate or fail to comply with these requirements, we could be subject to litigation, fines or other sanctions. Environmental requirements, and the enforcement and interpretation thereof, change frequently and have generally become more stringent over time. Compliance with existing and future environmental laws, regulations and permits may require significant expenditures. In addition, to the extent fuel content and characteristic standards increase our wholesale purchase costs, we may be adversely affected if we are unable to recover such costs in our pricing.

We could be subject to joint and several as well as strict liability for environmental contamination, without regard to fault or the legality of our conduct. In particular, we could be liable for contamination relating to properties that we own, lease or operate or that we or our predecessors previously owned, leased or operated. Substantially all of these properties have or in the past had storage tanks to store motor fuel or petroleum products. Leaks from such tanks may impact soil or groundwater and could result in substantial cleanup costs. We could also be held responsible for contamination relating to third-party sites to which we or our predecessors have sent hazardous materials. In addition to potentially significant investigation and remediation costs, any such contamination, leaks from storage tanks or other releases of hazardous materials can give rise to claims from governmental authorities and other third parties for fines or penalties, natural resource damages, personal injury and property damage.

Our business is also affected by fuel economy standards and greenhouse gas (“GHG”) vehicle emission reduction measures. As such fuel economy and GHG reduction requirements become more stringent over time, consumer demand for our products may be adversely affected. In addition, some of our facilities are subject to GHG regulation. We are currently required to report annual GHG emissions from certain of our operations, and additional GHG emission-related requirements that may affect our business have been finalized or are in various phases of discussion or implementation. Any existing or future GHG emission requirements could result in increased operating costs and additional compliance expenses.

Our expenditures, liabilities and obligations relating to environmental matters could have a material adverse effect on our business, product demand, reputation, results of operations and financial condition.

Future tobacco legislation, campaigns to discourage smoking, increases in tobacco taxes and wholesale cost increases of tobacco products could have a material adverse impact on our retail operating revenues and gross margin.

Sales of tobacco products have historically accounted for an important portion of our total sales of convenience store merchandise. Significant increases in wholesale cigarette costs and tax increases on tobacco products, as well as future legislation and national and local campaigns to discourage smoking in the United States, may have an adverse effect on the demand for tobacco products, and therefore reduce our revenues and profits. Competitive pressures in our markets can make it difficult to pass price increases on to our customers. These factors could materially and adversely affect our retail price of cigarettes, cigarette unit volume and sales, merchandise gross margin and overall customer traffic. Reduced sales of tobacco products or smaller gross margins on the sales we make could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Currently, major cigarette manufacturers offer substantial rebates to retailers. We include these rebates as a component of our gross margin. In the event these rebates are no longer offered, or decreased, our profit from cigarette sales will decrease accordingly. In addition, reduced retail display allowances on cigarettes offered by cigarette manufacturers would negatively affect gross margins. These factors could materially affect our retail price of cigarettes, cigarette unit volume and revenues, merchandise gross margin and overall customer traffic, which could in turn have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

 

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Our retail operations are subject to extensive government laws and regulations, and the cost of compliance with such laws and regulations can be material.

Our retail operations are subject to extensive local, state and federal governmental laws and regulations relating to, among other things, the sale of alcohol, tobacco and money orders, employment conditions, including minimum wage requirements, and public accessibility requirements. The cost of compliance with these laws and regulations can have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. In addition, failure to comply with local, state and federal laws and regulations to which our operations are subject may result in penalties and costs that could adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

In certain areas where our retail sites are located, state or local laws limit the retail sites’ hours of operation or their sale of alcoholic beverages, tobacco products, possible inhalants and lottery tickets, in particular to minors. Failure to comply with these laws could adversely affect our revenues and results of operations because these state and local regulatory agencies have the power to revoke, suspend or deny applications for and renewals of permits and licenses relating to the sale of these products or to seek other remedies, such as the imposition of fines or other penalties.

Regulations related to wages also affect our business. Any appreciable increase in the statutory minimum wage would result in an increase in our labor costs and such cost increase, or the penalties for failing to comply with such statutory minimums, could adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Further, although we are still evaluating what effect, if any, U.S. health care reform legislation may have on our business, a requirement to provide additional health insurance benefits to our employees, or health insurance coverage to additional employees, would likely increase our costs and expenses, and such increases could be significant enough to materially affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Any changes in the laws or regulations described above that are adverse to us and our properties could affect our operating and financial performance. In addition, new regulations are proposed from time to time which, if adopted, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Future consumer or other litigation could adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Our retail operations are characterized by a high volume of customer traffic and by transactions involving a wide array of product selections. These operations carry a higher exposure to consumer litigation risk when compared to the operations of companies operating in many other industries. Consequently, we have been, and may in the future be from time to time, involved in lawsuits seeking cash settlements for alleged personal injuries, property damages and other business-related matters, as well as energy content, off-specification gasoline, products liability and other legal actions in the ordinary course of our business. While these actions are generally routine in nature and incidental to the operation of our business, if our assessment of any action or actions should prove inaccurate, our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows could be adversely affected. For more information about our legal matters, see Note 18 “Contingencies” to the audited consolidated and combined historical financial statements for the three years ended December 31, 2013 included in this prospectus. Further, adverse publicity about consumer or other litigation may negatively affect us, regardless of whether the allegations are true, by discouraging customers from purchasing gasoline or merchandise at our retail sites.

 

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We rely on our IT systems and network infrastructure to manage numerous aspects of our business, and a disruption of these systems could adversely affect our business.

We depend on our IT systems and network infrastructure to manage numerous aspects of our business and provide analytical information to management. These systems are an essential component of our business and growth strategies, and a serious disruption to them could significantly limit our ability to manage and operate our business efficiently. These systems are vulnerable to, among other things, damage and interruption from power loss or natural disasters, computer system and network failures, loss of telecommunications services, physical and electronic loss of data, security breaches and computer viruses, which could result in a loss of sensitive business information, systems interruption or the disruption of our business operations. To protect against unauthorized access or attacks, we have implemented infrastructure protection technologies and disaster recovery plans, but there can be no assurance that a technology systems breach or systems failure, which may occur and go undetected, will not have a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations.

Our business and our reputation could be adversely affected by the failure to protect sensitive customer, employee or vendor data or to comply with applicable regulations relating to data security and privacy.

In the normal course of our business as a gasoline and merchandise retailer, we obtain large amounts of personal data, including credit and debit card information from our customers. While we have invested significant amounts in the protection of our IT systems and maintain what we believe are adequate security controls over individually identifiable customer, employee and vendor data provided to us, a breakdown or a breach in our systems that results in the unauthorized release of individually identifiable customer or other sensitive data could nonetheless occur and have a material adverse effect on our reputation, operating results and financial condition. Such a breakdown or breach could also materially increase the costs we incur to protect against such risks. Also, a material failure on our part to comply with regulations relating to our obligation to protect such sensitive data or to the privacy rights of our customers, employees and others could subject us to fines or other regulatory sanctions and potentially to lawsuits.

Compliance with and changes in tax laws could adversely affect our performance.

We are subject to extensive tax liabilities imposed by multiple jurisdictions, including income taxes, indirect taxes (excise/duty, sales/use and gross receipts taxes), payroll taxes, franchise taxes, withholding taxes and ad valorem taxes. New tax laws and regulations and changes in existing tax laws and regulations are continuously being enacted or proposed that could result in increased expenditures for tax liabilities in the future. Many of these liabilities are subject to periodic audits by the respective taxing authority. Subsequent changes to our tax liabilities as a result of these audits may subject us to interest and penalties.

Risks Relating to the Notes

Our ability to meet our payment obligations under the notes and our other debt depends on our ability to generate significant cash flow in the future.

Our ability to meet our payment and other obligations under our debt instruments including the notes, depends on our ability to generate significant cash flow in the future. This, to some extent, is subject to general economic, financial, competitive, legislative and regulatory factors as well as other factors that are beyond our control, including those described elsewhere in these “Risk Factors.” We cannot assure you that our business will generate cash flow from operations, or that future borrowings will be available to us under our credit facilities or any future credit facilities or otherwise, in an amount sufficient to enable us to meet our payment obligations under the notes and our other debt and to fund other liquidity needs. If we are not able to generate sufficient cash flow to service our debt obligations, we may need to refinance or restructure our debt, including the notes, sell assets, reduce or delay capital investments, or seek to raise additional capital. If we are unable to implement one or more of these alternatives, we may not be able to meet our payment obligations under the notes and our other debt.

 

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Despite our current indebtedness levels, we may be able to incur substantially more debt. This could exacerbate further the risks associated with our leverage.

We and our subsidiaries may incur substantial additional indebtedness, including secured indebtedness, in the future, subject to the terms of the Indenture (as defined in “Description of the Exchange Notes”) and our credit facilities that limit our ability to do so. Such additional indebtedness may include additional notes, which will also be guaranteed by the guarantors, to the extent permitted by the Indenture and our credit facilities. Although the Indenture limits our ability and the ability of our subsidiaries to create liens securing indebtedness, there are significant exceptions to these limitations that will allow us and our subsidiaries to secure significant amounts of indebtedness without equally and ratably securing the notes. If we or our subsidiaries incur secured indebtedness and such secured indebtedness is either accelerated or becomes subject to a bankruptcy, liquidation or reorganization, our and our subsidiaries’ assets would be used to satisfy obligations with respect to the indebtedness secured thereby before any payment could be made on the notes that are not similarly secured. In addition, the Indenture does not prevent us or our subsidiaries from incurring other liabilities that do not constitute indebtedness. If new debt or other liabilities are added to our current debt levels, the related risks that we now face could intensify.

The notes will be effectively subordinated to Murphy Oil USA’s and the guarantors’ existing and future secured indebtedness, including indebtedness under the credit facilities.

The notes are unsecured and rank behind all of Murphy Oil USA’s and the guarantors’ existing and future secured indebtedness, including indebtedness under the credit facilities, to the extent of the value of the collateral securing such indebtedness. As a result, upon any distribution to our creditors in a bankruptcy, liquidation, or reorganization or similar proceeding relating to us or our property, the holders of secured debt, including the lenders under the credit facilities, will be entitled to exercise the remedies available to a secured lender under applicable law and to be paid in full from the assets securing that secured debt before any payment may be made with respect to the notes. In that event, because the notes will not be secured by any of our or the guarantors’ assets, it is possible that there will be no assets from which claims of holders of the notes can be satisfied or, if any assets remain, that the remaining assets will be insufficient to satisfy those claims in full. If the value of such remaining assets is less than the aggregate outstanding principal amount of the notes and all other debt ranking pari passu with the notes, we may be unable to fully satisfy our obligations under the notes. In addition, if we fail to meet our payment or other obligations under our secured debt, the holders of that secured debt would be entitled to foreclose on our assets securing such debt and liquidate those assets. Accordingly, we may not have sufficient funds to pay amounts due on the notes. As a result, you may lose a portion of or the entire value of your investment in the notes.

Murphy Oil USA’s obligations under the credit facilities are guaranteed by Murphy USA and certain of Murphy USA’s domestic subsidiaries. The credit facilities and these guarantees are secured by a perfected first-priority security interest in (subject to certain customary permitted liens) all of the accounts (including trade and credit card accounts receivable) and related assets, inventory and cash and cash accounts (and any securities accounts) of Murphy USA, Murphy Oil USA, and the guarantors and equity interests in Murphy Oil USA and certain restricted subsidiaries of Murphy USA and all proceeds of the foregoing. At December 31, 2013, the notes and the related guarantees would have been effectively subordinated (to the extent of the value of the collateral) to $70 million of senior secured debt. Additional borrowing capacity for senior secured debt is available under the credit facilities. Our borrowing base following the fourth quarter of 2013 is approximately $390 million based on December 31, 2013 balance sheet information. In addition, the credit facilities provide for a $200 million uncommitted incremental facility, subject to the consent of the lenders therefor, all of which would be secured debt. Further, the terms of the notes permit us to incur additional secured indebtedness pursuant to other credit facilities or otherwise, subject to the restrictions on debt incurrence and liens provided for in the notes and the credit facilities. Your notes will be effectively subordinated to any such additional secured indebtedness.

 

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Not all of Murphy USA’s subsidiaries will guarantee the notes.

The notes are not guaranteed by any subsidiaries that are not or will not become guarantors or borrowers under the credit facilities, which includes any of Murphy USA’s non-U.S. subsidiaries (of which there are none as of December 31, 2013) and Murphy USA’s subsidiary that own and operate the remaining ethanol production facility in Hereford, Texas, for which the Company is currently considering strategic alternatives as described in “Business”. Murphy Oil USA’s non-guarantor subsidiaries are separate and distinct legal entities and have no obligation, contingent or otherwise, to pay any amounts due pursuant to the notes or the guarantees or to make any funds available therefor, whether by dividends, loans, distributions or other payments.

In the event that any of Murphy Oil USA’s non-guarantor subsidiaries becomes insolvent, liquidates, reorganizes, dissolves or otherwise winds up, holders of its debt, and its trade creditors generally, will be entitled to payment on their claims from the assets of such non-guarantor subsidiary before any of those assets are made available to us or any guarantor. Consequently, your claims in respect of the notes will be structurally subordinated to all of the third-party liabilities, including trade payables, of all of our subsidiaries that are not guarantors.

As of December 31, 2013, Murphy Oil USA’s non-guarantor subsidiaries had approximately $4.1 million of outstanding liabilities to third parties (which excludes intercompany indebtedness but includes trade payables), all of which would structurally rank senior to the notes. In addition, for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2013, Murphy Oil USA’s non-guarantor subsidiaries generated approximately $269.3 million, or 1.5%, of our revenues. These non-guarantor subsidiaries had $80.9 million of net income for the same period which included income from discontinued operations of $78.7 million.

Fraudulent conveyance laws may void the notes and/or the guarantees or subordinate the notes and/or the guarantees.

The issuance of the notes may be subject to review under applicable bankruptcy law or relevant fraudulent conveyance laws if a bankruptcy lawsuit is commenced by or on behalf of our or the guarantors’ creditors. Under these laws, if in such a lawsuit a court were to find that, at the time the notes were issued, we:

 

    incurred this debt with the intent of hindering, delaying or defrauding current or future creditors; or

 

    received less than reasonably equivalent value or fair consideration for incurring this debt, and the issuer:

 

    was insolvent or was rendered insolvent by reason of the related financing transactions;

 

    was engaged, or about to engage, in a business or transaction for which our remaining assets constituted unreasonably small capital to carry on our business; or

 

    intended to incur, or believed that we would incur, debts beyond our ability to pay these debts as they mature, as all of the foregoing terms are defined in or interpreted under the relevant fraudulent transfer or conveyance statutes;

then the court could void the notes or subordinate the notes to our presently existing or future debt or take other actions detrimental to you.

We cannot assure you as to what standard a court would apply in order to determine whether we were “insolvent” as of the date the notes were issued, and we cannot assure you that, regardless of the method of valuation, a court would not determine that we were insolvent on that date. Nor can we assure you that a court would not determine, regardless of whether we were insolvent on the date the notes were issued, that the payments constituted fraudulent transfers on another ground. Because the proceeds from this offering of notes were used to pay a dividend to Murphy Oil Corporation, a court could conclude that the notes were issued for less than reasonably equivalent value or fair consideration.

 

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The guarantees may also be subject to review under various laws for the protection of creditors. The analysis set forth above would generally apply, except that the guarantees could also be subject to the claim that, since the guarantees were incurred for the benefit of Murphy Oil USA and only indirectly for the benefit of the guarantors, the obligations of the guarantors thereunder were incurred for less than reasonably equivalent value or fair consideration. A court could void a guarantor’s obligation under its guarantee, subordinate the guarantee to the other indebtedness of a guarantor, direct that holders of the notes return any amounts paid under a guarantee to the relevant guarantor or to a fund for the benefit of its creditors, or take other action detrimental to the holders of the notes.

Because a guarantor’s liability under its guarantee may be reduced to zero, avoided or released under certain circumstances, you may not receive any payments from that guarantor.

The notes have the benefit of a guarantee by the guarantors. However, the guarantee by each guarantor is limited to the maximum amount that it is permitted to guarantee under applicable law. As a result, a guarantor’s liability under its guarantee could be reduced to zero, depending upon the amount of its other obligations. A court could also find any such limitation on the maximum amount of a guarantee to be ineffective or unenforceable and, under federal or state fraudulent conveyance statutes, void the obligations under the guarantee or further subordinate it to all other obligations of such guarantor. For example, in 2009, the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in the Southern District of Florida in Official Committee of Unsecured Creditors of TOUSA, Inc. v. Citicorp N. Am., Inc. found this kind of provision to be ineffective in that case, and held the guarantees to be fraudulent transfers and voided them in their entirety.

The guarantee of a guarantor (other than Murphy USA) will be suspended in certain circumstances when the notes are investment-grade rated, and will automatically terminate under certain circumstances, including if such guarantor is permanently released from its guarantee, and is not a borrower, under the credit facilities. Under any of these circumstances, you will not have the right to cause that subsidiary to perform under its guarantee.

We may be unable to repurchase the notes upon a Change of Control.

The terms of the notes require us to make an offer to repurchase the notes upon the occurrence of a Change of Control (as defined in “Description of the Exchange Notes”) at a purchase price equal to 101% of the principal amount of the notes, plus accrued interest to the date of the purchase. The occurrence of a Change of Control would cause an event of default under the credit facilities and therefore could cause us to have to repay amounts outstanding thereunder, and any financing arrangements we may enter into in the future may also require repayment of amounts outstanding in the event of a Change of Control and therefore limit our ability to fund the repurchase of your notes pursuant to the Change of Control Offer (as defined in “Description of the Exchange Notes”). It is possible that we will not have sufficient funds, or be able to arrange for additional financing, at the time of the Change of Control Offer to make the required repurchase of notes. If we have insufficient funds to repurchase all notes that holders tender for purchase pursuant to the Change of Control Offer, and we are unable to raise additional capital, an event of default would occur under the Indenture. An event of default could cause any other debt that we may have at that time to become automatically due and payable, further exacerbating our financial condition and diminishing the value and liquidity of the notes. We cannot assure you that additional capital would be available to us on acceptable terms, or at all. See “Description of the Exchange Notes—Change of Control.”

The terms of our credit facilities and the Indenture governing the notes include covenants that could restrict or limit our financial and business operations.

Our credit facilities and the Indenture governing the notes include restrictive covenants that, subject to certain exceptions and qualifications, restrict or limit our ability and the ability of our restricted subsidiaries to, among other things:

 

  incur, assume or guarantee additional indebtedness;

 

  make certain investments or pay dividends or distributions on our capital stock or purchase, redeem or retire capital stock or make certain other restricted payments;

 

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  sell assets, including capital stock of the restricted subsidiaries;

 

  restrict dividends and other payments by restricted subsidiaries;

 

  create liens or use assets as security in other transactions;

 

  engage in certain sale and leaseback transactions;

 

  enter into transactions with affiliates; and

 

  enter into mergers and consolidations, or sell, convey, transfer, lease or otherwise dispose of all or substantially all of our property and assets.

These covenants and restrictions could affect our ability to operate our business, and may limit our ability to react to market conditions or take advantage of potential business opportunities as they arise. Additionally, our ability to comply with these covenants may be affected by events beyond our control, including general economic and credit conditions and industry downturns, and the other factors described in these “Risk Factors.”

If we fail to comply with the covenants in our credit facilities and are unable to obtain a waiver or amendment, an event of default would result, and the lenders could, among other things, declare outstanding amounts due and payable, refuse to lend additional amounts to us, and require deposit of cash collateral in respect of outstanding letters of credit, which may trigger a cross-default on the notes. If we were unable to repay or pay the amounts due under the credit facilities, the lenders could, among other things, proceed against the collateral granted to them to secure such indebtedness, which would reduce the amount of cash-generating assets available to service interest payments on the notes or pay the principal thereon when due and/or reduce the pool of assets available to noteholders in a bankruptcy situation.

Many of the restrictive covenants contained in the Indenture will not apply if the notes are rated investment grade by Moody’s and S&P and no event of default has occurred and is continuing.

Many of the covenants in the Indenture governing the notes will not apply if the notes are rated investment grade (as defined in “Description of the Exchange Notes”) by Moody’s and S&P, provided that at such time no event of default with respect to the notes has occurred and is continuing. There can be no assurance that the notes will ever be rated investment grade or that if they are rated investment grade, that the notes will maintain such ratings. Termination of these covenants would allow us to engage in certain transactions that would not be permitted while these covenants were in force. See “Description of the Exchange Notes—Certain Covenants.”

Changes in our credit ratings or the debt markets could adversely affect the market price of the notes.

The price for the notes depends on many factors, including:

 

  our credit ratings;

 

  prevailing interest rates being paid by, or the market prices for debt securities issued by, other companies similar to us;

 

  our financial condition, financial performance and prospects; and

 

  the overall conditions of the general economy and the financial markets.

The conditions of the financial markets and prevailing interest rates have fluctuated in the past and are likely to fluctuate in the future. Such fluctuations could have an adverse effect on the price of the notes.

 

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Risks Related to the Exchange Offer

If you choose not to exchange your old notes in the exchange offer, the transfer restrictions currently applicable to your old notes will remain in force and the market price of your old notes could decline.

If you do not exchange your old notes for new notes in the exchange offer, then you will continue to be subject to the transfer restrictions on the old notes as set forth in the offering memorandum distributed in connection with the private offering of the old notes. In general, the old notes may not be offered or sold unless they are registered or exempt from registration under the Securities Act and applicable state securities laws. Except as required by the registration rights agreement entered into in connection with the private offering of the old notes, we do not intend to register resales of the old notes under the Securities Act. The tender of old notes under the exchange offer will reduce the principal amount of the old notes outstanding, which may have an adverse effect upon, and increase the volatility of, the market price of the old notes due to reduction in liquidity.

You must follow the exchange offer procedures carefully in order to receive the new notes.

If you do not follow the procedures described in this prospectus, you will not receive any new notes. If you want to tender your old notes in exchange for new notes, you will need to contact a DTC participant to complete the book-entry transfer procedures, or otherwise complete and transmit a letter of transmittal, in each case described under “The Exchange Offer,” prior to the expiration date, and you should allow sufficient time to ensure timely completion of these procedures to ensure delivery. No one is under any obligation to give you notification of defects or irregularities with respect to tenders of old notes for exchange. In addition, there are no guaranteed delivery procedures available to you in connection with this exchange offer. For additional information, see the section captioned “The Exchange Offer” in this prospectus.

There are state securities law restrictions on the resale of the new notes.

In order to comply with the securities laws of certain jurisdictions, the new notes may not be offered or resold by any holder, unless they have been registered or qualified for sale in such jurisdictions or an exemption from registration or qualification is available and the requirements of such exemption have been satisfied. We currently do not intend to register or qualify the resale of the new notes in any such jurisdictions. However, generally an exemption is available for sales to registered broker-dealers and certain institutional buyers. Other exemptions under applicable state securities laws also may be available.

 

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USE OF PROCEEDS

We will not receive any cash proceeds from the issuance of the new notes. The new notes will be exchanged for old notes as described in this prospectus upon our receipt of old notes. We will cancel all of the old notes surrendered in exchange for the new notes.

Our net proceeds from the sale of the old notes were approximately $489 million, after deduction of the initial purchasers’ discounts and commissions and other expenses of the offering. We used those net proceeds, together with borrowings under our credit facilities, to finance, in part, a cash dividend of $650 million to Murphy Oil Corporation in connection with the Separation.

 

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RATIO OF EARNINGS TO FIXED CHARGES

The following table sets forth our ratio of earnings to fixed charges for the periods indicated. The ratio of earnings to fixed charges was calculated by dividing earnings by fixed charges. Earnings were calculated by adding (1) income from continuing operations before income taxes, (2) interest and expense on indebtedness, excluding capitalized interest and (3) the interest portion of rentals. Fixed charges were calculated by adding interest and expense on indebtedness, excluding capitalized interest and the interest portion of rentals.

The following ratios reflect the combined operations of Murphy USA prior to the Separation, which was completed on August 30, 2013.

 

Year ended December 31,

2013    2012    2011    2010    2009

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

15.4x

   42.0x    79.0x    31.5x    15.8x

 

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SELECTED CONSOLIDATED AND COMBINED FINANCIAL DATA

The following selected consolidated and combined financial data reflect the combined operations of Murphy USA prior to the Separation, which was completed on August 30, 2013. We derived the selected consolidated and combined income statement data for the years ended December 31, 2013, 2012 and 2011, and the selected consolidated and combined balance sheet data as of December 31, 2013 and 2012, as set forth below, from Murphy USA’s audited consolidated and combined financial statements, which are included elsewhere in this prospectus. We derived the selected combined income statement data for the years ended December 31, 2009 and 2010, and the selected combined balance sheet data as of December 31, 2011 and 2010, from Murphy USA’s audited combined financial statements, which are not included in this prospectus. We derived the selected combined balance sheet data as of December 31, 2009 from Murphy USA’s underlying financial records, which were derived from the financial records of Murphy Oil, and which are not included in this prospectus. The historical results do not necessarily indicate the results expected for any future period. Net sales and other operating revenues amounts below include excise taxes collected on behalf of and remitted to various governmental entities in each year presented. Also, in the years ended December 31, 2009 to December 31, 2011, the difference between income from continuing operations and net income relates to the discontinued operations of the Meraux, Louisiana and Superior, Wisconsin refineries sold in late 2011. In addition, the selected consolidated and combined financial statements reflect the sale of our ethanol facility in Hankinson, North Dakota as discontinued operations for all periods presented.

You should read the selected consolidated and combined financial data presented below in conjunction with “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and the audited consolidated and combined financial statements and accompanying notes included elsewhere in this prospectus.

 

(Thousands of dollars, except per share data and ratios)

   2013      2012     2011      2010      2009  

Results of Operations for the Year

             

Net sales and other operating revenues

   $ 18,083,335      $ 19,301,308     $ 18,919,216      $ 15,356,057      $ 12,954,868  

Net cash provided by operating activities

   $ 356,698      $ 237,427     $ 188,373      $ 355,883      $ 434,377  

Income from continuing operations

   $ 156,326      $ 86,414     $ 187,853      $ 126,069      $ 36,250  

Net income (loss)

   $ 235,033      $ 83,568     $ 324,020      $ 157,441      $ 65,180  

Per Common Share—diluted (1)

             

Income (loss) from continuing operations

   $ 3.34      $ 1.85     $ 4.02      $ 2.70      $ 0.78  

Income (loss) from discontinued operations

   $ 1.68      $ (0.06   $ 2.91      $ 0.67      $ 0.62  

Net income (loss)

   $ 5.02      $ 1.79     $ 6.93      $ 3.37      $ 1.39  

Capital Expenditures for the Year (2)

             

Marketing

   $ 162,051      $ 103,152     $ 77,481      $ 176,882      $ 70,951  

Corporate and other

     9,402        1,344       22,338        4        —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Subtotal

   $ 171,453      $ 104,496     $ 99,819      $ 176,886      $ 70,951  

Discontinued operations

     519        7,097       361        4,812        —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total capital expenditures

   $ 171,972      $ 111,593     $ 100,180      $ 181,698      $ 70,951  
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Financial condition at December 31

             

Working capital

   $ 155,899      $ 88,053     $ 95,801      $ 103,651      $ 150,538  

Net property, plant and equipment

   $ 1,190,723      $ 1,169,960     $ 1,196,323      $ 1,166,169      $ 1,000,797  

Total assets (at period end)

   $ 1,881,242      $ 1,992,465     $ 1,784,983      $ 2,978,753      $ 2,534,544  

Long term debt (at period end)

   $ 547,578      $ 1,124     $ 1,170      $ 1,213      $ 83,253  

Stockholders’ equity/net parent investment

   $ 656,336      $ 1,104,451     $ 1,118,947      $ 1,808,150      $ 1,543,824  

 

(1) For the years ended December 31, 2009 through December 31, 2012, the number of diluted shares used at period end for the calculation is based on the number of shares issued at the date of the Separation from Murphy Oil on August 30, 2013.
(2) Does not include acquisition of ethanol plant assets in 2009 and 2010.

 

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MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Overview

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Results of Operations and Financial Condition (“Management’s Discussion and Analysis”) is the Company’s analysis of its financial performance and of significant trends that may affect future performance. It should be read in conjunction with the consolidated and combined financial statements and notes included in this prospectus. It contains forward-looking statements including, without limitation, statements relating to the Company’s plans, strategies, objectives, expectations and intentions. The words “anticipate,” “estimate,” “believe,” “budget,” “continue,” “could,” “intend,” “may,” “plan,” “potential,” “predict,” “seek,” “should,” “will,” “would,” “expect,” “objective,” “projection,” “forecast,” “goal,” “guidance,” “outlook,” “effort,” “target” and similar expressions identify forward-looking statements. The Company does not undertake to update, revise or correct any of the forward-looking information unless required to do so under the federal securities laws. Readers are cautioned that such forward-looking statements should be read in conjunction with the Company’s disclosures under “ Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” and “Risk Factors” included elsewhere in this prospectus.

For purposes of this Management’s Discussion and Analysis, references to “Murphy USA”, the “Company”, “we”, “us” and “our” refer to Murphy USA Inc. and its subsidiaries on a consolidated basis. For periods prior to completion of the Separation from Murphy Oil Corporation (“Murphy Oil”), these terms refer to Murphy Oil’s U.S. retail marketing business and other assets and liabilities that were contributed to Murphy USA in connection with the Separation, including an allocable portion of Murphy Oil’s corporate costs, on a combined basis.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis is organized as follows:

 

    Executive Overview—This section provides an overview of our business and the results of operations and financial condition for the periods presented. It includes information on the basis of presentation with respect to the amounts presented in this Management’s Discussion and Analysis and a discussion of the trends affecting our business.

 

    Results of Operations—This section provides an analysis of our results of operations, including the results of our business segments for the three years ended December 31, 2013.

 

    Capital Resources and Liquidity—This section provides a discussion of our financial condition and cash flows as of and for the three years ended December 31, 2013. It also includes a discussion of our capital structure and available sources of liquidity.

 

    Critical Accounting Policies—This section describes the accounting policies and estimates that we consider most important for our business and that require significant judgment.

Executive Overview

Our Business and Separation from Murphy Oil

Our business consists primarily of the U.S. retail marketing business that was separated from Murphy Oil, our former parent company, plus one remaining ethanol production facility and other assets, liabilities and operating expenses of Murphy Oil that are associated with supporting the activities of the U.S. retail marketing operations. The Separation was completed on August 30, 2013 through the distribution of 100% of the outstanding capital stock of Murphy USA to holders of Murphy Oil common stock on the record date of August 21, 2013. Murphy Oil stockholders of record received one share of Murphy USA common stock for every four shares of Murphy Oil common stock. The Separation was completed in accordance with a separation and distribution agreement entered into between Murphy Oil and Murphy USA. Following the Separation, Murphy USA is an independent, publicly traded company, and Murphy Oil retains no ownership interest in Murphy USA.

 

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We market refined products through a network of retail gasoline stations and unbranded wholesale customers. Our owned retail stations are almost all located in close proximity to Walmart stores and use the brand name Murphy USA®. We also market gasoline and other products at standalone stations under the Murphy Express brand. At December 31, 2013, we had a total of 1,203 Company stations in 23 states, principally in the Southwest, Southeast and Midwest United States.

In conjunction with the Separation, Murphy Oil received a private letter ruling from the Internal Revenue Service to the effect that the distribution will not result in any taxable income, gain or loss to Murphy Oil, except for taxable income or gain arising as a result of certain intercompany transactions, and no gain or loss will be recognized by (and no amount will be included in the income of) U.S. holders of Murphy Oil common stock upon their receipt of shares of Murphy USA common stock in the distribution, except with respect to cash received in lieu of fractional shares of Murphy USA common stock.

Basis of Presentation

Murphy USA was incorporated in March 2013 in contemplation of the Separation, and until the Separation was completed on August 30, 2013, it had not commenced operations and had no material assets, liabilities or commitments. Accordingly, the financial information presented in this Management’s Discussion and Analysis and the accompanying consolidated and combined financial statements reflect the combined historical results of operations, financial position and cash flows of the Murphy Oil subsidiaries and certain assets, liabilities, and operating expenses of Murphy Oil that comprise Murphy USA, as described above, as if such companies and accounts had been combined for all periods presented prior to August 30, 2013.

The assets and liabilities in these consolidated and combined financial statements at December 31, 2012 have been reflected on a historical basis, as all of the assets and liabilities presented were 100 percent owned by Murphy Oil at December 31, 2012 and represented operations of Murphy USA prior to the Separation. For the period prior to Separation, the consolidated and combined income statements also include expense allocations for certain corporate functions historically performed by Murphy Oil, including allocations of general corporate expenses related to executive oversight, accounting, treasury, tax, legal, procurement and information technology. These allocations are based primarily on specific identification, headcount or computer utilization. Murphy USA’s management believes the assumptions underlying the consolidated and combined financial statements, including the assumptions regarding allocating general corporate expenses from Murphy Oil, are reasonable. However, these consolidated and combined financial statements may not include all of the actual expenses that would have been incurred had the Company been a stand-alone company during the period prior to Separation and may not reflect the combined results of operations, financial position and cash flows had the Company been a stand-alone company during the entirety of the periods presented.

Actual costs that would have been incurred if Murphy USA had been a stand-alone company would depend upon multiple factors, including organizational structure and strategic decisions made in operational areas, including information technology and infrastructure.

Subsequent to the Separation, Murphy Oil continues to perform certain of these corporate functions on our behalf, for which we are charged a fee in accordance with the Transition Services Agreement entered into between Murphy Oil and Murphy USA on August 30, 2013 (the “Transition Services Agreement”). There are also some services that are performed by Murphy USA on behalf of Murphy Oil and these are also being handled in accordance with the Transition Services Agreement.

The consolidated financial statements reflect our financial results for all periods subsequent to the Separation while the combined financial statements reflect our financial results for all periods prior to the Separation. Accordingly:

 

   

Our consolidated and combined statement of income and comprehensive income for the year ended December 31, 2013, consists of the consolidated results of Murphy USA for the four months ended

 

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December 31, 2013 and the combined results of Murphy Oil’s U.S. retail marketing business for the eight months ended August 31, 2013. Our combined income statements and comprehensive income for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011 consist entirely of the combined results of Murphy Oil’s U.S. retail marketing business.

 

    Our consolidated balance sheet at December 31, 2013, consists of the consolidated balances of Murphy USA, while our combined balance sheet at December 31, 2012 consists of the combined balances of Murphy Oil’s U.S. retail marketing business.

 

    Our consolidated and combined statement of cash flows for the year ended December 31, 2013, consists of the consolidated results of Murphy USA for the four months ended December 31, 2013 and the combined results of Murphy Oil’s U.S. retail marketing business for the eight months ended August 31, 2013. Our combined statement of cash flows for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011, consists entirely of the combined results of Murphy Oil’s U.S. retail marketing business.

 

    Our consolidated and combined statement of changes in equity for the year ended December 31, 2013, consists of both the combined activity for Murphy Oil’s U.S. retail marketing business prior to August 30, 2013, and the consolidated activity of Murphy USA subsequent to the Separation. Our combined statement of changes in equity for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011, consists entirely of the combined results of Murphy Oil’s U.S. retail marketing business.

Trends Affecting Our Business

Our operations are significantly impacted by the gross margins we receive on our fuel sales. These gross margins are commodity-based, change daily and are volatile. While we expect our total fuel sales volumes to grow and the gross margins we realize on those sales to remain strong, these gross margins can change rapidly due to many factors. These factors include, but are not limited to, the price of refined products, interruptions in supply caused by severe weather, severe refinery mechanical failures for an extended period of time, and competition in the local markets in which we operate. In addition, our ethanol production operations are impacted by the price of corn, and may be affected by future droughts and by ethanol demand levels in the United States which can be impacted by foreign imports and Federal and state regulations.

The cost of our main sales products, gasoline and diesel, is greatly impacted by the cost of crude oil in the United States. Generally, rising prices for crude oil increase the Company’s cost for wholesale fuel products purchased. When wholesale fuel costs rise, the Company is not always able to immediately pass these price increases on to its retail customers at the pump, which in turn squeezes the Company’s sales margin. Also, rising prices tend to cause our customers to reduce discretionary fuel consumption, which tends to reduce our fuel sales volumes. Margins for U.S. retail marketing weakened in the fourth quarter of 2013 versus the averages achieved in the second and third quarters of 2013 while ethanol margins improved slightly in the fourth quarter 2013 compared to the first three quarters of 2013. However, based on NYMEX crude oil futures as of mid-March 2014, we expect there will be decreasing U.S. crude oil prices through the remainder of 2014.

In addition, our revenues are impacted by our ability to leverage our diverse supply infrastructure in pursuit of obtaining the lowest cost of fuel supply available; for example, activities such as blending bulk fuel with ethanol and bio-diesel to capture and subsequently sell Renewable Identification Numbers (“RINs”). Under the Energy Policy Act of 2005, the Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) is authorized to set annual quotas establishing the percentage of motor fuels consumed in the United States that must be attributable to renewable fuels. Companies that blend fuels are required to demonstrate that they have met any applicable quotas by submitting a certain amount of RINs to the EPA. RINs in excess of the set quota (as well as RINs captured by companies such as ours that are not subject to quotas) can then be sold in a market for RINs at then-prevailing prices. The market price for RINs fluctuates based on a variety of factors, including but not limited to governmental and regulatory action. In recent historical periods, we have benefited by our ability to attain RINs and sell them at favorable prices in the market. The increase in RIN values and ensuing changes to our supply

 

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mix resulted in higher RIN revenues in 2013 versus 2012. However, during the latter part of 2013, we have observed declining RIN prices. Our business model does not depend on our ability to generate revenues from RINs. Revenue from the sales of RINs is included in “Ethanol sales and other” in the Consolidated and Combined Income Statements.

In August 2013, in connection with the Separation, we incurred $650 million of new debt from the issuance of senior secured notes and borrowings under the credit facilities, which we used to finance a cash dividend to Murphy Oil immediately prior to the Separation. We believe that we will generate sufficient cash from operations to fund our ongoing operating requirements. We expect to use the credit facilities to provide us with available financing intended to meet any ongoing cash needs in excess of internally generated cash flows. To the extent necessary, we will borrow under these facilities to fund our ongoing operating requirements. At December 31, 2013, we have additional available capacity under the committed $450 million credit facilities (subject to periodic borrowing base limitations), together with capacity under a $200 million incremental uncommitted facility. There can be no assurances, however, that we will generate sufficient cash from operations or be able to draw on the credit facilities, obtain commitments for our incremental facility and/or obtain and draw upon other credit facilities.

On December 21, 2012, we signed an agreement with Walmart providing for the potential purchase of land to develop approximately 200 new Company stations located adjacent to existing Walmart stores in Walmart’s core market area covering the Southwest, Southeast, and Midwest United States. The construction program is expected to be completed over approximately three more years. In connection with this agreement, we expect to incur additional station operating and depreciation expenses due to the addition of new stores. However, we can provide no assurance that we will develop all or any of the sites as contemplated under the agreement. See “Risk Factors – Risks Relating to Our Business—Our ability to continue to generate revenue and operating income depends on our continued relationship with Walmart” in this prospectus. The Company currently anticipates total capital expenditures (including purchases of Walmart properties and other land for future development) for the full year 2014 to be approximately $196 million. We intend to fund our capital program in 2014 primarily using operating cash flow, but will supplement funding where necessary using borrowings under available credit facilities.

We believe that our business will continue to grow in the future as we expect to build additional locations in close proximity to Walmart stores and other locations. The pace of this growth is continually monitored by our management, and these plans can be altered based on operating cash flows generated and the availability of debt facilities.

Seasonality

Our business has inherent seasonality due to the concentration of our retail sites in certain geographic areas, as well as customer activity behaviors during different seasons. In general, sales volumes and operating incomes are highest in the second and third quarters during the summer activity months and lowest during the winter months.

Business Segments

Our business is organized into one reporting segment (Marketing). The Marketing segment includes our retail marketing sites and product supply and wholesale assets. Prior to December 2013, we also had an Ethanol segment which consisted of our ethanol production facilities located in Hankinson, North Dakota and in Hereford, Texas. After the Hankinson facility was sold in December 2013, we reassessed our segments and due to its small size, we have included the remainder of the former Ethanol segment in prior “Corporate” section which has been renamed “Corporate and other assets”. Therefore, we have restated our segments for the current period and all prior periods to reflect one remaining reporting segment, Marketing. The Hereford facility began operations in early 2011 and we wrote down the carrying value at this facility at year end 2012 due to expectations of continued weak margins in the

 

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future. We are currently considering strategic alternatives for the remaining Hereford ethanol facility. As part of this effort, we are evaluating various factors including the appropriate timing and market conditions to maximize value in any potential sale; however, a final decision has not yet been determined and this remaining ethanol asset does not meet the criteria for “held for sale” presentation at this time. Therefore, historical financial results for the Hereford plant are included in continuing operations for all periods presented.

For operating segment information, see Note 20 “Business Segments” in the accompanying audited consolidated and combined financial statements for the three-year period ended December 31, 2013.

Results of Operations

Consolidated and Combined Results

For the year ended December 31, 2013, the Company reported net income of $235.0 million or $5.02 per diluted share on revenue of $18.08 billion. Net income was $83.6 million for 2012 or $1.79 per diluted share on $19.30 billion in revenue.

A summary of the Company’s earnings by business segment follows:

 

(thousands of dollars)    Year ended December 31,  
     2013     2012     2011  

Marketing

   $ 164,013     $ 139,583     $ 188,907  

Corporate and other assets

     (7,687     (53,169     (1,054
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Subtotal

     156,326       86,414       187,853  

Discontinued operations

     78,707       (2,846     136,167  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income

   $ 235,033     $ 83,568     $ 324,020  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income for the year ended December 31, 2013 increased compared to the prior year primarily due to:

 

    Increased prices for RINs in the 2013 period over the prior year;

 

    Income in our remaining ethanol plant operations due to lower corn costs caused by the favorable weather and harvest conditions in the current year along with higher ethanol prices;

 

    Slightly improved fuel margins in our retail marketing business; and

 

    Sale of Hankinson ethanol subsidiary in December 2013 generated a large gain in discontinued operations.

Net income for 2012 decreased compared to the prior year primarily due to:

 

    Weaker fuel margins in our retail marketing business;

 

    Losses incurred in our ethanol plant operations due to high corn costs caused by the drought combined with lower ethanol prices and asset impairment charges associated with one of our ethanol plants; and

 

    Income from discontinued operations associated with the former refining assets sold in late 2011 did not recur.

2013 versus 2012

Revenues for the year ended December 31, 2013 decreased $1.22 billion, or 6.3%, compared to 2012. Significant items impacting these results include a decline in the price of retail fuel of 9.9 cents per gallon (cpg), one less month of the Walmart $0.10/$0.15 per gallon discount program, a less favorable wholesale price

 

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environment during the year and overall weaker consumer demand partially offset by an increase in total retail fuel volumes sold of 0.8% which is partially attributable to an increased store count.

Cost of sales on a combined basis decreased $1.31 billion, or 7.1%, compared to 2012. This decline is primarily due to a decrease in the purchase price of motor fuel for both the retail and wholesale locations. Partially offsetting this decline was an increase in cost of sales for the increased store count in the current year.

Selling, general and administrative expenses for the current year have increased $19.9 million, however this number includes $15.4 million of spin related and other one-time, non-recurring charges. The remainder of the selling, general and administrative cost increases is due primarily to higher allocations of corporate charges from Murphy Oil for the 2013 period compared to the 2012 period for the periods prior to the Separation.

Interest expense is higher in 2013 compared to 2012 due to the issuance in mid-August 2013 of the $500 million Senior Notes to partially fund the cash dividend to Murphy Oil of $650 million paid at the completion of the Separation. In addition, concurrent with the Separation, the Company borrowed $150 million in a term loan under its credit facilities, of which we repaid $80 million in the fourth quarter of 2013. As these borrowings did not exist in the prior year, there is a large increase in interest expense that is in line with the transactions closed by management pre-spin.

Gain on sale of assets contains a gain of $6.0 million due to the sale of our North Dakota crude supply assets during the period. These assets were a holdover from the Superior, Wisconsin refinery that was sold in 2011 and were deemed by management to be non-core to the Company.

Income tax expense increased in the period primarily due to the increase in pre-tax earnings. The tax rate is at 39.3% for the current year and 42.5% for 2012. The 2012 effective rate is higher due to losses at the Hereford ethanol plant with no related state benefit that affected the mix of income/loss, which had the effect of raising the effective rate in 2012.

Income from discontinued operations for the current year is $78.7 million, net of tax of $42.3 million compared to a loss of $2.8 million in 2012, net of tax benefit of $1.5 million. The current year income from discontinued operations contains a gain on sale of the Hankinson ethanol facility of $52.5 million, net of tax of $28.3 million. The facility was sold in December 2013.

2012 versus 2011

Revenues for 2012 increased $382 million, or 2.0%, compared to 2011. Significant items impacting these results include an increase in the price of retail fuel of 5.0 cents per gallon (cpg) partially offset by an increase in total fuel volumes on an absolute basis. Ethanol sales at Hereford were also higher in 2012 versus 2011 by $82.9 million due to higher prices for co-products and increased sales volumes in 2012.

Cost of sales on a combined basis increased $435 million, or 2.4%, compared to 2011. This increase was primarily due to an increase in the purchase price of motor fuel for both the retail and wholesale locations combined with higher store count in 2012 due to new builds.

Station and other operating expense was higher in 2012 by $18.7 million. This growth in expenses was primarily due to the increased level of stores in 2012 because 37 sites were opened in 2012 versus 30 stores in 2011 and higher labor and benefits cost was incurred at all stores for 2012 compared to 2011.

Selling, general and administrative expenses for 2012 increased $20.0 million, due primarily to higher allocations of corporate charges from Murphy Oil for 2012 compared to 2011 prior to the Separation.

 

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Impairment expense in 2012 was $61.0 million due to the determination at year end 2012 that the Hereford plant was impaired based on the future price curve and the results of a discounted cash flow analysis. There was no impairment expense in 2011.

Income tax expense decreased in the period primarily due to the decrease in pre-tax earnings. The tax rate is at 42.5% for 2012 and 39.6% for 2011. The 2012 effective rate is higher due to losses at the Hereford ethanol plant that affected the mix of income/loss, which had the effect of raising the effective rate in 2012.

Income from discontinued operations for 2012 is a loss of $2.8 million compared to income of $136.2 million in 2011. 2011 contained the gains on the sale of the Meraux and Superior refineries along with their operating results for that year compared to 2012 which only contained the losses incurred by the Hankinson facility.

Segment Results

Marketing

Net income in the Marketing segment for 2013 increased $24.4 million, or 17.5%, over 2012. The primary reason for this increase was a significant increase in the value received from the sale of RINs in 2013, together with an increase in volumes from increased store count partially offset by retail fuel pricing pressure.

The table below shows the results for the Marketing segment for the three years ended December 31, 2013 along with certain key metrics for the segment.

 

(Thousands of dollars, except volume per store month and margins)   Years Ended December 31,  
    2013     2012     2011  

Revenues

     

Petroleum product sales

  $ 15,560,317     $ 16,854,985     $ 16,586,845  

Merchandise sales

    2,159,466       2,144,347       2,115,567  

Other

    94,298       11,708       9,538  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenues

  $ 17,814,081     $ 19,011,040     $ 18,711,950  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Costs and operating expenses

     

Petroleum product cost of goods sold

    15,009,955       16,298,316       15,961,162  

Merchandise cost of goods sold

    1,877,630       1,855,641       1,851,867  

Station and other operating expenses

    460,475       447,102       433,821  

Depreciation and amortization

    71,253       66,913       61,136  

Selling, general and administrative

    129,600       109,532       90,990  

Accretion of asset retirement obligations

    1,096       980       877  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total costs and operating expenses

  $ 17,550,009     $ 18,778,484     $ 18,399,853  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income from operations

    264,072       232,556       312,097  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Other income (expense)

     

Gain (loss) on sale of assets

    5,995       (1,005     (363

Other nonoperating income

    169       91       311  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total other income (expense)

  $ 6,164     $ (914   $ (52
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income from continuing operations before income taxes

    270,236       231,642       312,045  

Income tax expense

    106,223       92,059       123,138  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income from continuing operations

  $ 164,013     $ 139,583     $ 188,907  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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     Years Ended December 31,  
     2013     2012     2011  

Gallons sold per store month

     268,458       277,001       277,715  

Fuel margin (cpg)

     13.0       12.9       15.6  

Fuel margin $ per store month

   $ 34,998     $ 35,815     $ 43,298  

Total tobacco sales revenue per store month

   $ 122,094     $ 127,785     $ 131,854  

Total non-tobacco sales revenue per store month

   $ 30,455     $ 28,644     $ 26,290  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total merchandise sales revenue per store month

   $ 152,549     $ 156,429     $ 158,144  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Merchandise margin $ per store month

   $ 19,909     $ 21,061     $ 20,205  

Merchandise margin as a percentage of merchandise sales

     13.1 %     13.5 %     12.8 %

Store count at end of period

     1,203       1,165       1,128  

Average retail sites open during the period (store months)

     1,180       1,142       1,115  

2013 versus 2012

Total fuel volumes for the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2012 were 3.80 billion gallons attributable primarily to an increased store count in the current year. However, retail fuel volumes in 2013 on an average per store month (APSM) basis were lower by 3.1% compared to 2012. The decline in retail volumes on an APSM was due to significantly less price volatility year over year, a decrease in the duration of the Walmart discount program year over year, and overall weaker consumer demand.

Total period revenues for the Marketing segment were approximately $17.8 billion in 2013 compared to approximately $19.0 billion in 2012, a decrease of $1.2 billion. Revenue amounts included excise taxes collected and remitted to government authorities of $1.9 billion in 2013 and $2.0 billion in 2012. Total fuel sales volumes per station averaged 268,458 gallons per month in 2013, down 3.1% from 277,001 gallons per month in the prior year. Fuel margin increased slightly in 2013 to 13.0 cpg, compared to 12.9 cpg in the prior year. The slightly higher fuel margins in the period were attributed to periods of decreasing wholesale prices, which caused margins to expand slightly from prior year levels. Total product supply and wholesale margin dollars excluding RINs were $54.2 million in the year ended December 31, 2013 period compared to $65.1 million in 2012. These product supply and wholesale margin dollars do not include $20.0 million and $18.5 million of combined operating expense and SG&A costs for the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively. Also impacting operating income positively in the year ended December 31, 2013 was sale of RINs of $91.4 million compared to $8.9 million in the prior year. During 2013, 171 million RINs were sold at an average selling price of $0.53 per RIN.

Merchandise sales increased slightly to $2.2 billion in 2013, up $15.1 million from 2012 levels. Merchandise margins decreased 0.4%, from 13.5% in the 2012 period to 13.1% in the current year. This decline in margin was caused by pressure on certain tobacco related product margins, which was partially offset by increased sales of higher margin non-tobacco items sold in our stores. Total non-tobacco sales revenues increased 9.8% and related margin dollars increased 7.0% year over year. Categories showing the most improvement in the current year include beverages, candy, salty snacks, and lottery/lotto. On an APSM basis, total merchandise sales were down 2.5% with tobacco products down 4.5%, partially offset by a 6.3% increase in non-tobacco sales. Total margins on an APSM basis for the year were down 5.5% with tobacco margins down 10.3%, partially offset by a 3.6% increase in non-tobacco margins. Merchandise margins on an APSM basis in 2013 were slightly lower than in 2012 with a decrease in merchandise sales revenue per store month of 2.5%, which was more than offset by an increased number of stores operating in 2013.

Station and other operating expenses increased $13.4 million in the current year compared to 2012 levels, an increase of 3.0%. This increase was due to higher store counts in the 2013 period. The largest line item increases within station and other operating expenses were salaries, benefits and taxes, maintenance, and environmental charges in the

 

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2013 period compared to the prior year, partially offset by lower credit card fees due to lower sales prices. Excluding credit card fees on an APSM basis, station and other operating expenses at the retail level only increased 1.9% over 2012 levels.

Depreciation and amortization increased $4.3 million in 2013, an increase of 6.5%. This increase was caused by more stores operating in the 2013 period compared to the prior year.

Selling, general and administrative expenses increased $20.1 million in 2013 compared to 2012. This increase was primarily due to higher corporate overhead costs charged to Murphy USA by Murphy Oil for shared services during the period prior to the spin-off along with higher spin-related and other one-time, non-recurring costs of $15.4 million.

2012 versus 2011

Income from continuing operations for the marketing segment decreased $49.3 million in 2012 compared to 2011. The primary cause of this decline was lower retail fuel margins by 2.7 cpg in 2012 compared to 2011. Fuel sales volumes in 2012 were essentially flat to the prior year on an APSM basis. Total margin on sales of merchandise was up almost 10% compared to prior year as merchandise margins as a percentage of sales increased more than the decline in merchandise sales revenue, partially offset by lower sales per store month.

The marketing segment total revenues were up $299 million in 2012 to $19.0 billion compared to the 2011 amount of $18.7 billion. Revenue amounts included excise taxes collected and remitted to government authorities of $2.0 billion in 2012 and $1.8 billion in 2011. Total fuel sales volumes per station averaged 277,001 gallons per month in 2012, down 0.3% from the prior year amounts. Fuel margins decreased in 2012 to an average of 12.9 cpg, compared to 15.6 cpg in 2011, a decrease of 2.7 cpg or 17.3%. The lower fuel margins were caused by increased wholesale gasoline prices which were not fully recovered through higher prices to customers at the pump.

Within operating revenues, merchandise sales increased $28.8 million in 2012, up 1.4% compared to 2011. On an APSM basis, merchandise revenues decreased 1.1% in 2012 over the comparable prior year period. Total merchandise margins in 2012 were 13.5% of merchandise sales compared to 12.8% in 2011, an increase of 0.7%. Total non-tobacco sales revenues increased 11.6% over the prior year and total non-tobacco margins increased 15.2% over 2011 levels.

Station and other operating expenses increased $13.3 million in 2012 compared to 2011 levels, an increase of 3.1% overall. This increase was partly due to 37 new stores being added in 2012. The largest increases within station operating expenses were for additional salaries and benefits costs for store employees.

Depreciation and amortization in 2012 was up $5.8 million, or 9.4%, over the prior year. This increase was caused by the addition of 29 net stores in 2011 that had a full year of depreciation in 2012 combined with partial year expense for the 37 stores added during 2012.

Selling, general and administrative expenses increased in 2012 by $18.5 million over 2011. This increase was due primarily to higher corporate overhead costs charged to Murphy USA by Murphy Oil for shared services.

Corporate and other assets

2013 versus 2012

After-tax net income for Corporate and other assets improved in 2013 to a loss of $7.7 million compared to a loss of $53.2 million in 2012. The 2013 year included income from the Hereford plant and was more than offset by the increased interest expense in the Corporate and other assets area due to the debt taken out to pay a cash

 

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dividend to Murphy Oil concurrent with the Separation. This increase in interest expense was due to amounts drawn down since the August 2013 issuance of $500 million in Senior Notes and the drawdown of $150 million in term loan under our credit facilities, of which we repaid $80 million in the fourth quarter of 2013. 2012 also contained the impairment charge taken on the Hereford plant of $39.6 million, net of tax.

2012 versus 2011

Corporate and other assets loss of $53.2 million in 2012 included $52.0 million of losses related to the Hereford ethanol plant. Of the $52.0 million, approximately $39.6 million, net of tax, related to an impairment charge on the Hereford facility that was recorded in December 2012 based on a discounted cash flow analysis prepared at then current prices. In 2011, losses from Corporate and other assets was $1.1 million which consisted almost entirely of corporate expenses. Corporate costs exclusive of the Hereford operations consisted primarily of depreciation expense on corporate assets such as the Company’s airplane, computer hardware and software, and other miscellaneous assets that was consistent year over year.

Discontinued operations in 2011 related to both the sale of the Meraux, Louisiana and Superior, Wisconsin refineries and Hankinson while 2012 only contained the operations of Hankinson. See Note 4 “Discontinued Operations” in the accompanying audited consolidated and combined financial statements for more information on the disposed assets.

Balance Sheet Information

As of December 31, 2013, the Hereford ethanol subsidiary had total assets of $27.7 million, or 1.5% of our total assets, which was comprised primarily of property, plant and equipment and related inventories to operate the facility. Also at December 31, 2013, the ethanol subsidiary had total liabilities of $4.1 million, or 0.3% of our total liabilities.

Non-GAAP Measures

The following table sets forth the Company’s Adjusted EBITDA for the three years ended December 31, 2013. EBITDA means net income (loss) plus net interest expense, plus income tax expense, depreciation and amortization, and Adjusted EBITDA adds back (i) other non-cash items (e.g., impairment of properties and accretion of asset retirement obligations) and (ii) other items that management does not consider to be meaningful in assessing our operating performance (e.g., (income) from discontinued operations, gain (loss) on sale of assets and other non-operating expense (income)). EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA are not measures that are prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP).

We use EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA in our operational and financial decision-making, believing that such measures are useful to eliminate certain items in order to focus on what we deem to be a more reliable indicator of ongoing operating performance and our ability to generate cash flow from operations. Adjusted EBITDA is also used by many of our investors, research analysts, investment bankers, and lenders to assess our operating performance. However, non-GAAP financial measures are not a substitute for GAAP disclosures, and Adjusted EBITDA may be prepared differently by us than by other companies using similarly titled non-GAAP measures.

 

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The reconciliation of net income to EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA follows:

 

     Years Ended December 31,  
(Thousands of dollars)    2013     2012     2011  

Net income

   $ 235,033     $ 83,568     $ 324,020  

Income taxes

     101,351       63,705       122,960  

Interest expense, net of interest income

     13,410       212       376  

Depreciation and amortization

     74,130       71,740       64,879  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

EBITDA

     423,924       219,225       512,235  

(Income) loss from discontinued operations, net of taxes

     (78,707     2,846       (136,167

Impairment of properties

     —          60,988       —     

Accretion of asset retirement obligations

     1,096       980       877  

(Gain) loss on sale of assets

     (5,995     1,005       363  

Other nonoperating income (loss)

     (169     (91     (311
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Adjusted EBITDA

   $ 340,149     $ 284,953     $ 376,997  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

The Company also considers Free Cash Flow in the operation of its business. Free cash flow is defined as net cash provided by operating activities in a period minus payments for property and equipment made in that period. Free cash flow is also considered a non-GAAP financial measure. Management believes, however, that free cash flow, which measures our ability to generate additional cash from our business operations, is an important financial measure for us in evaluating the Company’s performance. Free cash flow should be considered in addition to, rather than as a substitute for consolidated net income as a measure of our performance and net cash provided by operating activities as a measure of our liquidity.

Numerous methods may exist to calculate a company’s free cash flow. As a result, the method used by our management to calculate our free cash flow may differ from the methods other companies use to calculate their free cash flow. The following table provides a reconciliation of free cash flow, a non-GAAP financial measure, to net cash provided by operating activities, which we believe to be the GAAP financial measure most directly comparable to free cash flow:

 

     Years Ended December 31,  
(Thousands of dollars)    2013     2012     2011  

Net cash provided by operating activities

   $ 356,698     $ 237,427     $ 188,373  

Payments for property and equipment

     (164,536     (104,496     (99,819
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Free cash flow

   $ 192,162     $ 132,931     $ 88,554  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Capital Resources and Liquidity

Significant sources of capital

As of December 31, 2013, we had $294.7 million of cash and cash equivalents. Our cash management policy provides that cash balances in excess of a certain threshold are reinvested in certain types of low-risk investments.

Since December 31, 2012, the level of Accounts Receivable and Accounts Payable have decreased significantly due to the cessation of activities with Murphy Oil to market certain crude oil and also due to the sale of our North Dakota crude gathering assets earlier in 2013. It is not currently anticipated that our total receivables or total payables would approach the 2012 year end levels in the near term.

We obtained borrowing capacity under a committed $450 million asset based loan facility (the “ABL facility”) (subject to periodic borrowing base limitations) and a $150 million term facility, as well as a

 

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$200 million incremental uncommitted facility. As described below, substantially concurrently with the Separation, we borrowed $150 million under the term facility, the proceeds of which were used, together with the net proceeds of the issuance of senior unsecured notes, to finance, a $650 million cash dividend to Murphy Oil. In October and December 2013, we repaid $80 million of the term loan using cash from operations and the proceeds from the sale of our ethanol facility in Hankinson, North Dakota. At December 31, 2013 we had $70 million of term loan outstanding, and $450 million of borrowing capacity under our ABL facility that we could utilize for working capital and other general corporate purposes, including to support our operating model as described herein. Our borrowing base is approximately $390 million based on December 31, 2013 balance sheet information. See “—Debt—Credit Facilities” for the calculation of our borrowing base.

We believe our short-term and long-term liquidity is adequate to fund not only our operations, but also our anticipated near-term and long-term funding requirements, including capital spending programs, potential dividend payments, repayment of debt maturities and other amounts that may ultimately be paid in connection with contingencies.

Historically, cash generated from operating activities was our primary source of liquidity combined with support from Murphy Oil through the use of its consolidated U.S. cash management system. In addition, cash proceeds from the sale of our two refineries and related marketing assets in 2011 were passed through to Murphy Oil in partial settlement of intercompany payables.

Cash presented on our combined balance sheets prior to the Separation represented cash on hand at our retail locations, cash that had not yet been transferred to Murphy Oil and cash held by us at our ethanol manufacturing operations at that time. We reflected transfers of cash to and from Murphy Oil’s cash management system as a component of net parent investment on our combined balance sheets, and these net transfers of cash were reflected as a financing activity in our combined statements of cash flows.

Operating Activities

Net cash provided by operating activities was $356.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 and $237.4 million for the comparable period in 2012, an increase of 50.3%, primarily because of improved operating performance and drawdowns of accounts receivable and products inventories in 2013 and timing of month end compared to our receivables positions. Net income improved $151.5 million in 2013 compared to 2012 and the amount of cash generated from drawdown of working capital in the 2013 period improved by $42.3 million. Net cash provided by operating activities was $188.4 million in 2011. The primary reason for changes in the amounts between 2012 and 2011 related to a lower use of cash to build working capital compared to the prior year, which was the main driver in the increase of $49.1 million on total operating cash flows. Included in net cash provided by operating activities were cash flows provided by discontinued operations of $49.7 million in 2013, $1.1 million in 2012, and $179.8 million in 2011. These cash flows provided by discontinued operations were generated from U.S. refining operations prior to their sale on or about December 31, 2011 and from the recently disposed Hankinson ethanol operations in each year.

Investing Activities

For the year ended December 31, 2013, cash provided by investing activities was $12.9 million compared to cash required by investing activities of $112.1 million in 2012. The investing cash increase of $125.0 million in 2013 was primarily due to proceeds from the sale of the Hankinson facility that resulted in investing cash flows from discontinued operations. Capital expenditures in 2013 required cash of $164.5 million compared to $104.5 million in 2012. The primary reason for the increase in capital expenditures in 2013 relates to the land purchase required under the December 2012 agreement with Walmart and an increase in station construction cost over the prior year.

In 2012, cash required by investing activities was $112.1 million while 2011 provided cash from investing activities of $812.9 million due primarily to the sale of the Meraux, Louisiana and Superior, Wisconsin refineries.

 

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The 2011 source of cash related to investing activities was the combined $950.0 million received for the two refineries and related crude oil and product inventories. For 2012, virtually all of the cash used for investing activities related to capital expenditures to build 37 retail marketing locations and ethanol plant improvements. In 2011, capital expenditures for continuing operations were $99.8 million, the majority of which related to construction of 30 retail locations.

Financing Activities

Financing activities in the year ended December 31, 2013 used cash of $132.2 million compared to use of $104.9 million in the year ended December 31, 2012. This increased use of cash was due to repaying $80.0 million of the term loan borrowed in August 2013 to fund the cash dividend to Murphy Oil at the separation date. This was partially offset by less cash provided to Murphy Oil in the 2013 period prior to the Separation. Net cash required by financing activities in 2011 was $1.02 billion. In both 2012 and 2011, virtually all of the change was due to movements in accounts related to the net parent investment between Murphy USA and Murphy Oil. In 2011, $950 million of the total financing cash flow repaid to Murphy Oil was provided by the sale of the two refineries.

Debt

In connection with the Separation, we incurred an aggregate of $650 million in long-term debt, the proceeds of which we used to finance a cash dividend to Murphy Oil that was paid on the separation date. Our long-term debt at December 31, 2013 and 2012 was as set forth below:

 

     December 31,  

(Thousands of dollars)

   2013     2012  

Loan for electrical facilities at the Hankinson, North Dakota ethanol plant, 6.00%, due through 2028*

   $ —        $ 1,170  

6.00% senior notes due 2023 (net of unamortized discount of $8,422)

     491,578       —     

Term loan due 2016 (effective rate of 3.71% at December 31, 2013)

     70,000       —     

Less current maturities

     (14,000     (46
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total long-term debt

   $ 547,578     $ 1,124  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

* In connection with the sale of Hankinson Renewable Energy, LLC to Guardian Hankinson, LLC on December 19, 2013, the electrical facilities loan payable including current maturities was assumed by the new owners per the sales agreement.

Senior Notes

On August 14, 2013, Murphy Oil USA, our primary operating subsidiary, issued 6.00% Senior Notes due 2023 (the “Senior Notes”) in an aggregate principal amount of $500 million. The Senior Notes are fully and unconditionally guaranteed by Murphy USA, and are guaranteed on a joint and several basis by certain subsidiaries that guarantee our credit facilities. The indenture governing the Senior Notes contains restrictive covenants that limit, among other things, the ability of Murphy USA, Murphy Oil USA and the restricted subsidiaries to incur additional indebtedness or liens, dispose of assets, make certain restricted payments or investments, enter into transactions with affiliates or merge with or into other entities.

The Senior Notes and the guarantees rank equally with all of our and the guarantors’ existing and future senior unsecured indebtedness and effectively junior to our and the guarantors’ existing and future secured indebtedness (including indebtedness with respect to the credit facilities) to the extent of the value of the assets securing such indebtedness. The Senior Notes are structurally subordinated to all of the existing and future third-party liabilities, including trade payables, of our existing and future subsidiaries that do not guarantee the notes.

 

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We used the net proceeds of the Senior Notes, together with borrowings under the credit facilities, to finance a cash dividend of $650 million from Murphy Oil USA to Murphy Oil paid in connection with the Separation.

In addition, we are party to a registration rights agreement, which requires us to exchange the Senior Notes for notes eligible for public resale within 360 days of the issuance of the Senior Notes, or alternatively under certain circumstances, to file a shelf registration statement for public resales of the Senior Notes. We have filed the registration statement of which this prospectus forms a part in order to complete an exchange offer for the Senior Notes pursuant to this agreement.

Credit Facilities

On August 30, 2013, we entered into a credit agreement, which provides for a committed $450 million asset-based loan (ABL) facility (with availability subject to the borrowing base described below) and a $150 million term facility. It also provides for a $200 million uncommitted incremental facility. The ABL facility is scheduled to mature on August 30, 2018, subject to the ability to extend for two additional one-year periods with the consent of the extending lenders. The term facility is scheduled to mature on August 30, 2016. On August 30, 2013, Murphy Oil USA borrowed $150 million under the term facility, the proceeds of which were used, together with the net proceeds of the offering of the Senior Notes, to finance the $650 million cash dividend to Murphy Oil. On October 8, 2013, we elected to prepay $15 million on the term facility with our excess available cash from operations. In addition, we repaid $65 million of the term facility on December 23, 2013, with a portion of the proceeds received from the completed sale of the Hankinson, North Dakota ethanol plant.

The borrowing base is expected, at any time of determination, to be an amount (net of reserves) equal to the sum of:

 

    100% of eligible cash at such time, plus

 

    90% of eligible credit card receivables at such time, plus

 

    90% of eligible investment grade accounts, plus

 

    85% of eligible other accounts, plus

 

    80% of eligible product supply/wholesale refined products inventory at such time, plus

 

    75% of eligible retail refined products inventory at such time, plus

the lesser of (i) 70% of the average cost of eligible retail merchandise inventory at such time and (ii) 85% of the net orderly liquidation value of eligible retail merchandise inventory at such time.

The ABL facility includes a $75 million sublimit on swingline loans and a $200 million sublimit for the issuance of letters of credit. Swingline loans and letters of credit issued under the ABL facility reduce availability under the ABL facility.

Interest payable on the credit facilities is based on either:

 

    the London interbank offered rate, adjusted for statutory reserve requirements (the “Adjusted LIBO Rate”); or

 

    the Alternate Base Rate, which is defined as the highest of (a) the prime rate, (b) the federal funds effective rate from time to time plus 0.50% per annum and (c) the one-month Adjusted LIBO Rate plus 1.00% per annum,

plus, (A) in the case Adjusted LIBO Rate borrowings, (i) with respect to the ABL facility, spreads ranging from 1.50% to 2.00% per annum depending on the average availability under the ABL facility or (ii) with respect to the term facility, spreads ranging from 2.75% to 3.00% per annum depending on a secured debt to EBITDA

 

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ratio and (B) in the case of Alternate Base Rate borrowings, (i) with respect to the ABL facility, spreads ranging from 0.50% to 1.00% per annum depending on the average availability under the ABL facility or (ii) with respect to the term facility, spreads ranging from 1.75% to 2.00% per annum depending on a secured debt to EBITDA ratio.

The interest rate period with respect to the Adjusted LIBO Rate interest rate option can be set at one-, two-, three-, or six-months as selected by us in accordance with the terms of the credit agreement.

We are obligated to make quarterly principal payments on the outstanding principal amount of the term facility beginning on the first anniversary of the effective date of the credit agreement in amounts equal to 10% of the term loans made on such effective date, with the remaining balance payable on the scheduled maturity date of the term facility. Borrowings under the credit facilities are prepayable at our option without premium or penalty. We are also required to prepay the term facility with the net cash proceeds of certain asset sales or casualty events, subject to certain exceptions. The credit agreement also includes certain customary mandatory prepayment provisions with respect to the ABL facility.

The credit agreement contains certain covenants that limit, among other things, the ability of us and our subsidiaries to incur additional indebtedness or liens, to make certain investments, to enter into sale-leaseback transactions, to make certain restricted payments, to enter into consolidations, mergers or sales of material assets and other fundamental changes, to transact with affiliates, to enter into agreements restricting the ability of subsidiaries to incur liens or pay dividends, or to make certain accounting changes. In addition, the credit agreement requires us to maintain a fixed charge coverage ratio of a minimum of 1.0 to 1.0 when availability for at least three consecutive business days is less than the greater of (a) 17.5% of the lesser of the aggregate ABL facility commitments and the borrowing base and (b) $70,000,000 (including as of the most recent fiscal quarter end on the first date when availability is less than such amount), as well as a maximum secured debt to EBITDA ratio of 4.5 to 1.0 at any time when term facility commitments or term loans thereunder are outstanding. As of December 31, 2013, our fixed charge coverage ratio and the secured leverage ratio were 1.18 and 0.20, respectively.

All obligations under the credit agreement are guaranteed by Murphy USA and the subsidiary guarantors party thereto, and all obligations under the credit agreement, including the guarantees of those obligations, are secured by certain assets of Murphy USA, Murphy Oil USA and the guarantors party thereto.

Contractual Obligations

The following table summarizes our aggregate contractual fixed and variable obligations as of December 31, 2013.

 

(Thousands of dollars)

   Total      Less than
1 year
     1-3 years      4-5 years      More than
5 years
 

Debt obligations (a)

   $ 561,578      $ 14,000      $ 56,000      $ —         $ 491,578  

Operating lease obligations

     106,821        10,461        20,183        17,322        58,855  

Purchase obligations (b)

     143,999        62,198        81,801        —           —     

Asset retirement obligations

     108,165        —           —           —           108,165  

Other long-term obligations, including interest on long-term debt

     319,201        52,477        65,245        62,850        138,629  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 1,239,764      $ 139,136      $ 223,229      $ 80,172      $ 797,227  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(a) For additional information, see Note 8 “Long-Term Debt” in the accompanying audited consolidated and combined financial statements.
(b) Primarily includes ongoing new retail station construction in progress at December 31, 2013 and commitments to purchase land from Walmart and other landowners. See Note 17 “Commitments” in the audited consolidated and combined financial statements for the three years ended December 31, 2013.

 

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Capital Spending

Capital spending and investments in our Marketing segment relate primarily to the acquisition of land and the construction of new Company stations. Our Marketing capital is also deployed to improve our existing sites, which we refer to as sustaining capital. We also use sustaining capital in this business as needed to ensure reliability and continued performance of the plant. We also invest in our Corporate and other assets segment which is primarily spin-related infrastructure costs that benefit the entire Company along with capital spending at the remaining Hereford ethanol plant. The following table outlines our capital spending and investments by segment for the three years ended December 31, 2013:

 

     2013      2012      2011  

Marketing:

        

Company stores

   $ 141,221      $ 72,895      $ 48,626  

Terminals

     2,251        —           2,965  

Sustaining capital

     18,579        30,257        25,890  

Corporate and other assets

     9,402        1,344        22,338  

Discontinued operations

     519        7,097        361  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 171,972      $ 111,593      $ 100,180  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

We currently expect capital expenditures for the full year 2014 to be approximately $196 million, including $183 million for the retail marketing business, $2 million for the remaining ethanol facility, $4 million for product supply and wholesale operations and $7 million for Corporate and other assets needs. See Note 17 “Commitments” in the audited consolidated and combined financial statements for the three years ended December 31, 2013 included in this prospectus. Within our retail marketing spending, we anticipate approximately $12 million will be sustaining capital with the remainder invested in construction of new Company stations.

Critical Accounting Policies

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

Individual retail sites are reviewed for impairment periodically or whenever events or circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. Our primary indicator that operating store assets may not be recoverable is consistent negative cash flow for a twelve-month period for those retail sites that have been open in the same location for a sufficient period to allow for meaningful analysis of ongoing results. We also monitor other factors when evaluating retail sites for impairment, including individual site execution of operating plans and local market conditions.

When an evaluation is required, the projected future undiscounted cash flows to be generated from each retail site over its remaining economic life are compared to the carrying value of the long-lived assets of that site to determine if a write-down of the carrying value to fair value is required. When determining future cash flows associated with an individual retail site, we make assumptions about key variables such as sales volume, gross margins and expenses. Cash flows vary for each retail site year to year. Changes in market demographics, traffic patterns, competition and other factors impact the overall operations of certain of our individual retail site locations. Similar changes may occur in the future that will require us to record impairment charges. We have not made any material change in the methodology used to estimate future cash flows of retail site locations during the past three years.

Our impairment evaluations are based on assumptions we deem to be reasonable. If the actual results of our retail sites are not consistent with the estimates and judgments we have made in estimating future cash flows and determining fair values, our actual impairment losses could vary positively or negatively from our estimated impairment losses. Providing sensitivity analysis if other assumptions were used in performing the impairment evaluations is not practical due to the significant number of assumptions involved in the estimates.

 

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Environmental and Other Loss Contingencies

For loss contingencies including environmental and legal matters, a provision is charged to expense when the loss is probable and the cost can be reasonably estimated. Judgment is often required to determine when expenses should be recorded for legal, environmental, and other contingency matters. In addition, we often must estimate the amount of such losses. We closely monitor known and potential legal, environmental, and other contingency matters, and make our best estimate of the amount of losses and when they should be recorded based on available information.

Our operations are subject to stringent environmental laws, regulations and permits. These requirements, and the enforcement and interpretation thereof, change frequently and have generally become more stringent over time. Compliance with existing and future environmental laws, regulations and permits may require significant expenditures. In addition, we incur ongoing costs to address contamination at certain of our current and former terminals and retail fueling stations. As of December 31, 2013, 2012, and 2011 our environmental liabilities were $5.5 million, $3.3 million and $2.0 million, respectively. These environmental liabilities represent our estimates for future expenditures to address certain known contamination, based on current regulations, historical results and certain other factors. For more information regarding environmental matters, see “Business—Environmental.” Environmental reserves are based on internal and external estimates of costs to remediate sites. Factors considered in the estimates of the reserves are expected costs and the estimated length of time to remediate each contaminated site. Estimated remediation costs are not discounted because the timing of payments cannot be reasonably estimated. The adequacy of the liability is adjusted periodically based on factual developments, including the discovery of additional contamination, the imposition of further cleanup obligations and changes in governmental policies and regulations. See also Note 18 “Contingencies” in the accompanying consolidated and combined audited financial statements for the three years ended December 31, 2013.

Tax Matters

We are subject to extensive tax liabilities imposed by multiple jurisdictions, including income taxes, indirect taxes (excise/duty, sales/use, and gross receipts taxes), payroll taxes, franchise taxes, withholding taxes and ad valorem taxes. New tax laws and regulations and changes in existing tax laws and regulations are continuously being enacted or proposed that could result in increased expenditures for tax liabilities that cannot be predicted at this time. In addition, we have received claims from various jurisdictions related to certain tax matters. Tax liabilities include potential assessments of penalty and interest amounts.

We record tax liabilities based on our assessment of existing tax laws and regulations. A contingent loss related to a transactional tax claim is recorded if the loss is both probable and estimable. The recording of our tax liabilities requires significant judgments and estimates. Actual tax liabilities can vary from our estimates for a variety of reasons, including different interpretations of tax laws and regulations and different assessments of the amount of tax due. In addition, in determining our income tax provision, we must assess the likelihood that our deferred tax assets will be recovered through future taxable income. Significant judgment is required in estimating the amount of valuation allowance, if any, that should be recorded against those deferred income tax assets. If our actual results of operations differ from such estimates or our estimates of future taxable income change, the valuation allowance may need to be revised. However, an estimate of the sensitivity to earnings that would result from changes in the assumptions and estimates used in determining our tax liabilities is not practicable due to the number of assumptions and tax laws involved, the various potential interpretations of the tax laws, and the wide range of possible outcomes. See Note 10 “Income Taxes” in the accompanying audited consolidated and combined financial statements for the three-year period ended December 31, 2013 for a further discussion of our tax liabilities.

Asset Retirement Obligations

We operate above ground and underground storage tanks at our facilities. We recognize the estimated future cost to remove these underground storage tanks (“USTs”) over their estimated useful lives. We record a

 

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discounted liability for the fair value of an asset retirement obligation with a corresponding increase to the carrying value of the related long-lived asset at the time a UST is installed. We depreciate the amount added to cost of the property and recognize accretion expense in connection with the discounted liability over the remaining life of the UST.

We have not made any material changes in the methodology used to estimate future costs for removal of a UST during the past three years. We base our estimates of such future costs on our prior experience with removal and normal and customary costs we expect to incur associated with UST removal. We compare our cost estimates with our actual removal cost experience, if any, on an annual basis, and if the actual costs we experience exceed our original estimates, we will recognize an additional liability for estimated future costs to remove the USTs. Because these estimates are subjective and are currently based on historical costs with adjustments for estimated future changes in the associated costs, the dollar amount of these obligations could change as more information is obtained. There were no material changes in our asset retirement obligation estimates during 2013, 2012, or 2011. See also Note 9 “Asset Retirement Obligation” in the accompanying audited consolidated and combined financial statements for the three-year period ended December 31, 2013.

QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

Interest Rate Risk

We have a committed $450 million ABL facility and a $150 million term facility, as well as a $200 million uncommitted incremental facility. We borrowed $150 million under the term facility in August 2013, of which we repaid $80 million in the fourth quarter of 2013. As of December 31, 2013, we had $70 million of term debt outstanding, and no outstanding revolver debt. We expect to use the additional borrowing capacity under the ABL facility from time to time for working capital and other general corporate purposes, including to support our operating model as described herein.

Interest payable on the credit facilities is based on either:

 

    the Adjusted LIBO Rate; or

 

    the Alternate Base Rate, which is defined as the highest of (a) the prime rate, (b) the federal funds effective rate from time to time plus 0.50% per annum and (c) the one-month Adjusted LIBO Rate plus 1.00% per annum,

plus, (A) in the case Adjusted LIBO Rate borrowings, (i) with respect to the ABL facility, spreads ranging from 1.50% to 2.00% per annum depending on the average availability under the ABL facility or (ii) with respect to the term facility, spreads ranging from 2.75% to 3.00% per annum depending on a secured debt to EBITDA ratio and (B) in the case of Alternate Base Rate borrowings, (i) with respect to the ABL facility, spreads ranging from 0.50% to 1.00% per annum depending on the average availability under the ABL facility or (ii) with respect to the term facility, spreads ranging from 1.75% to 2.00% per annum depending on a secured debt to EBITDA ratio.

The interest rate period with respect to the Adjusted LIBO Rate interest rate option can be set at one-, two-, three-, or six-months as selected by the Borrower in accordance with the terms of the credit agreement.

Assuming a weighted average interest rate of 3.00% for our indebtedness under the credit facilities at December 31, 2013, a one-eighth change in the Adjusted LIBO Rate would result in a $87,500 increase/ decrease in our annualized interest expense.

While we cannot predict our ability to refinance existing debt or the impact interest rate movements will have on our existing debt, management evaluates our financial position on an ongoing basis.

 

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Commodity Price Risk

We are exposed to market risks related to the volatility in the price of crude oil, refined products (primarily gasoline and diesel) and grain (primarily corn) used in our operations. These fluctuations can affect our revenues and purchases, as well as the cost of operating, investing and financing activities. We make limited use of derivative instruments to manage certain risks related to commodity prices. The use of derivative instruments for risk management is covered by operating policies and is closely monitored by the Company’s senior management.

As described in Note 13 “Financial Instruments and Risk Management” in the accompanying audited consolidated and combined financial statements, there were short-term commodity derivative contracts in place at December 31, 2013 to hedge the purchase price of corn and the sales prices of wet and dried distillers grain at the Company’s remaining ethanol production facility in Hereford, Texas. A 10% increase in the respective benchmark price of the commodities underlying these derivative contracts would have increased the recorded net liability associated with these derivative contracts by approximately $1.0 million, while a 10% decrease would have increased the recorded net asset by a similar amount. Changes in the fair value of these derivative contracts generally offset the changes in the value for an equivalent volume of these feedstocks.

For additional information about our use of derivative instruments, see Note 13 “Financial Instruments and Risk Management” in our audited consolidated and combined financial statements for the three year period ended December 31, 2013 included in this prospectus.

CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

None.

 

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BUSINESS

Our business consists primarily of marketing of retail motor fuel products and convenience merchandise through a large chain of 1,203 (as of December 31, 2013) retail stations operated by us, almost all of which are in close proximity to Walmart stores. Our retail stations are located in 23 states, primarily in the Southwest, Southeast and Midwest United States. Of these stations, 1,021 are branded Murphy USA and 182 are standalone Murphy Express locations (as of December 31, 2013). Our retail stations under the brand name Murphy USA® participate in the Walmart discount program that we offer at most locations. The Walmart discount program offers a cents-off per gallon purchased for fuel when using specific payment methods as decided by Walmart and us. The amount of the discount offered can vary based on many factors, including state laws. Our Murphy Express branded stations are not connected to the Walmart discount program but are otherwise similar to the Murphy USA sites, including the types of fuel and merchandise offerings available to our customers.

Our business also includes certain product supply and wholesale assets, including product distribution terminals and pipeline positions. As an independent publicly traded company, we believe we are a low-price, high volume fuel retailer selling convenience merchandise through low cost locations with key strategic relationships and experienced management.

Murphy USA was incorporated in Delaware on March 1, 2013 and holds, through its subsidiaries, the U.S. retail marketing business that was separated from our former parent company, Murphy Oil, plus certain ethanol production facilities and other assets and liabilities of Murphy Oil that supported the activities of the U.S. retail marketing operations. The Separation was approved by the Murphy Oil board of directors on August 7, 2013, and was completed on August 30, 2013 through the distribution of 100% of the outstanding capital stock of Murphy USA to holders of Murphy Oil common stock on the record date of August 21, 2013. Murphy Oil stockholders of record received one share of Murphy USA common stock for every four shares of Murphy Oil common stock. The spin-off was completed in accordance with a separation and distribution agreement (the “Separation and Distribution Agreement”) entered into between Murphy Oil and Murphy USA. Murphy USA is now an independent, publicly traded company, and Murphy Oil retains no ownership interest in Murphy USA.

Following the sale of our Hankinson, North Dakota ethanol production facility in December 2013, the operations of the Company are reported as one reporting segment: Marketing, which refers to our U.S. retail marketing operations as described above. All of the Company’s business operations are conducted in the United States. In addition to the Marketing reporting segment noted, “Corporate and other assets” activities include interest income, interest expense, and depreciation on certain assets that are not allocated to the Marketing segment and also include our remaining ethanol production facility located in Hereford, Texas.

Our business is subject to various risks. For a description of these risks, see “Risk Factors” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” included elsewhere in this prospectus.

Information about our operations, properties and business segments, including revenues by class of products and financial information by geographic area, are provided on pages 27 through 46, F-15, and F-30 to F-31 of this prospectus.

Our Competitive Strengths

Our business foundation is built around five reinforcing strengths which we feel give us a competitive advantage over our peers.

Strategic and complementary relationship with Walmart

Of our network of 1,203 retail gasoline stations (as of December 31, 2013), more than 1,000 are situated on prime locations in close proximity to Walmart stores. We believe our proximity to Walmart stores generates

 

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significant traffic to our retail stations while our competitively priced gasoline and convenience offerings appeal to our shared customers. We also collaborate with Walmart on a fuel discount program which we believe enhances the customer value proposition as well as the competitive position of both Murphy USA and Walmart with respect to our peers. We began our relationship with Walmart in 1996 and in December 2012 we signed an agreement that allows us to build approximately 200 new sites on Walmart locations, which we expect to complete over the next few years. We believe Walmart will continue to serve as a strategic partner as we pursue further organic growth opportunities on existing and new Walmart locations in both our core and adjacent geographies.

Winning proposition with value-oriented consumers

Our competitively priced fuel is a compelling offering for value-oriented consumers. Despite a flat long-term outlook in overall gasoline demand (vehicle miles traveled in a normal economy essentially offsetting increased fuel efficiency), we believe value-oriented consumers represent a growing demand segment. In combination with our high traffic locations, our low gasoline prices drive high fuel volumes and gross profit. In addition, we are an industry leader in per-site tobacco sales with our low-priced tobacco products and total store sales per square foot as we also sell a growing assortment of convenience items that complement Walmart’s primary in-store product offering. We continually provide value opportunities to our customers such as our cross promotions with soft drink, candy/snack and tobacco partners that offer a fuel discount if certain quantities of products are purchased.

Low cost retail operating model

We operate our retail gasoline stations with a strong emphasis on fuel sales complemented by a focused convenience offering that allows for a smaller store footprint than many of our competitors. A substantial majority of our stations are standardized 208 or 1,200 square foot formats, which we believe have very low capital expenditure and maintenance requirements relative to our competitors. In addition, many of our stations require only one or two attendants to be present during business hours and the majority of our stores are located on Company-owned property and do not incur any rent expense. The combination of a focused convenience offering and standardized smaller footprint stores allows us to achieve lower overhead costs, on-site costs and labor costs compared to competitors with a larger store format. According to the 2012 National Association of Convenience Stores’ State of the Industry Survey, we operate at approximately 56% of the average monthly operating costs for top quartile performing stores in the industry. In addition, we operate among the highest industry safety standards and had a Total Recordable Incident Rate (TRIR) and Days Away from Work (DAW) rate that was substantially lower than the industry averages in 2012 using the most current published data by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Our focus on safety and cost advantages translate into a lower fuel breakeven requirement that allows us to weather extended periods of lower fuel margins.

Advantaged fuel supply

We source fuel at very competitive industry benchmark prices due to the diversity of fuel options available to us in the bulk and rack product markets, our shipper’s status on major pipeline systems, and our access to numerous terminal locations. In addition, we have a strong distribution system in which we utilize a “Best Buy” method that dispatches third-party tanker trucks to the most favorably priced terminal to load products for each Murphy site, further reducing our fuel product costs. By participating in the broader fuel supply chain, we believe our business model provides additional upside exposure to opportunities to enhance margins and volume. For example, incremental revenue is generated by capturing and selling Renewable Identification Numbers (“RINs”) via our capability to source bulk fuel and subsequently blend ethanol and bio-diesel at the terminal level. We can also optimize the supply chain by shifting non-contractual wholesale volumes to protect retail fuel supply. These activities demonstrate our belief that participating in the broader fuel supply chain provides us with added flexibility to ensure reliable low-cost fuel supply in various market conditions and especially during periods of significant price volatility.

 

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Resilient financial profile

Our predominantly fee-simple asset base, ability to generate attractive gross margins through our low-price, high volume strategy, and our low overhead costs should help us endure prolonged periods of commodity price volatility and compressed fuel margins. In connection with the Separation, we entered into a new credit facility, borrowed $150 million of term loans thereunder and issued $500 million aggregate principal amount of 6% senior unsecured notes due 2023. In October and December 2013, we repaid $80 million of the term loan using cash from operations and the proceeds from the sale of our ethanol facility in Hankinson, North Dakota. We expect that our strong cash position and availability under our credit facility will continue to provide us with a significant level of liquidity to help maintain a disciplined growth capital expenditure program through periods of both high and low fuel margins.

Our Business Strategy

Our business strategies reflect a set of coherent choices that leverage our differentiated strengths and capabilities.

Grow organically with Walmart

We intend for our relationship with Walmart to be a key driver of our organic growth over the next several years. We expect to build approximately 200 sites in core markets on or near Walmart locations over the next few years and are evaluating opportunities for additional growth beyond those locations. Approximately 950 of our locations currently participate in our fuel discount program with Walmart which reinforces Walmart’s low-price philosophy. In addition, in the near term, we will seek to rebrand additional Murphy Express sites as Murphy USA and connect these sites to the fuel discount program. We will continue to work with Walmart on the implementation and improvement of the fuel discount program as we believe it is an effective promotional tool for maximizing fuel volumes and investment returns.

Enhance store economics to improve investment returns

We plan to continuously evaluate our store format strategy in an effort to maximize our site economics and return on investment. As part of that strategy, we are continually refining our new 1,200 square foot format design to create a foundation for increasing higher-margin non-tobacco sales and diversifying our merchandise offerings. For example, we continue to tailor our product offerings to complement the retail selection within Walmart stores, such as offering products in a variety of quantities and sizes, or stock keeping units (SKUs), which are more convenience-oriented. By implementing new merchandising, space management and workforce planning capabilities, we expect to further optimize merchandise revenue, labor needs and overall site returns.

Improve functional infrastructure to lower overhead costs

We believe that we are better positioned to manage our cost structure, execute a more scalable business model and implement certain technology and business efficiency initiatives as an independent company. In order to do this successfully, we will focus heavily on the development of our employees and foster a high performance culture where incentives are aligned with business performance. We believe that through our planned growth and efficiency initiatives, we can achieve reductions in overhead costs to support an overall improvement in our site returns.

Focus product supply and wholesale participation

We plan to continue to focus our product supply and wholesale efforts on activities that enhance our ability to be a low-price retail fuel leader, by optimizing our fuel supply contracts to capitalize on market dynamics whenever possible and minimizing physical product supply and wholesale asset ownership. We also intend to allocate capital and human resources only to product supply and wholesale assets that provide a specific retail

 

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advantage. In considering strategic alternatives for product supply and wholesale assets that do not directly benefit our retail operations, such as our remaining ethanol production facility, we intend to pursue actions that will maximize shareholder value and enhance our ability to execute on our planned retail strategy.

Focus on long-term investment

We maintain a portfolio of predominantly fee-simple assets and we believe we have an appropriate debt structure that will allow us to be resilient during times of fuel price and margin volatility. We believe our strong financial position should allow us to profitably execute on our low-cost, high volume retail strategy and our organic growth strategy through periods of both high and low fuel margins. Furthermore, we will consider all alternatives for returning excess earnings or capital with a focus on maximizing shareholder value.

Industry Trends

We operate within the large and growing U.S. retail fueling store industry, which is highly fragmented. We believe we will continue to benefit from several key industry trends and characteristics, including:

 

    Increased sensitivity to gas prices among price conscious consumers, and increasing demand for low-priced fuel sellers;

 

    Highly fragmented nature of the industry providing larger chain operators with significant scale advantage; and

 

    Increasing consumer traffic around supermarkets and large format hypermarkets, supporting complementary consumer demand at nearby retail fueling and convenience stores.

Corporate Information

Murphy USA was incorporated in Delaware on March 1, 2013 and our business consists of U.S. retail marketing operations. Our headquarters are located at 200 Peach Street, El Dorado, Arkansas 71730 and our general telephone number is (870) 875-7600. Our Internet website is www.murphyusa.com. Our website and the information contained on that site, or connected to that site, are not incorporated by reference into this prospectus. Shares of Murphy USA common stock are traded on the NYSE under the ticker symbol “MUSA”.

Description of Our Business

We market fueling products through a network of Company retail stations and unbranded wholesale customers. During 2013, Company stations sold approximately 3.8 billion gallons of motor fuel through our retail outlets.

Below is a table that lists the states where we operate Company-owned stations at December 31, 2013 and the number of stations in each state.

 

State

   No. of stations      State    No. of stations      State    No. of stations  

Alabama

     68       Kansas      1       New Mexico      9   

Arkansas

     61       Kentucky      39       Ohio      42   

Colorado

     6       Louisiana      61       Oklahoma      50   

Florida

     112       Michigan      23       South Carolina      52   

Georgia

     81       Minnesota      7       Tennessee      82   

Iowa

     21       Missouri      46       Texas      253   

Illinois

     26       Mississippi      50       Virginia             6   
              

 

 

 

Indiana

     32       North Carolina      75       Total      1,203   
              

 

 

 

 

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The following table provides a history of our Company-owned station count during the three-year period ended December 31, 2013:

 

     Years Ended December 31,  
     2013     2012      2011  

Number at beginning of period

     1,165       1,128        1,099  

New construction

     39       37        30  

Closed

     (1     —           (1
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Number at end of period

     1,203       1,165        1,128  
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

In recent years, we have purchased from Walmart the properties underlying 914 of our Company stations. Our December 21, 2012 agreement with Walmart provides for the potential purchase of approximately 200 additional sites. In January 2013, we paid approximately $42 million as a first installment on these land purchases. Our agreement requires us to obtain Walmart’s approval of our development plans and to indemnify Walmart for certain environmental liabilities. In addition, Walmart has the right to terminate the agreement with respect to certain properties located adjacent to Walmart stores if the sale of any such property to us would result in certain claims or liabilities against Walmart or, in Walmart’s sole discretion, would impair the operation of the related Walmart store.

Each of our owned properties that were purchased from Walmart is also subject to Easements and Covenants with Restrictions Affecting Land (“ECRs”), which impose customary restrictions on the use of such properties, which Walmart has the right to enforce. In addition, pursuant to the ECRs, certain transfers involving these properties are subject to Walmart’s right of first refusal or right of first offer. Also pursuant to the ECRs, we are prohibited from transferring such properties to a competitor of Walmart.

For risks related to our December 2012 agreement with Walmart, including the ECRs, see “Risk Factors—Risks Relating to Our Business—Walmart retains certain rights in its agreements with us, which may adversely impact our ability to conduct our business.”

For the remaining fueling stations located on or adjacent to Walmart property that are not owned, we have a master lease agreement that allows us to rent land from Walmart. The master lease agreement contains general terms applicable to all rental sites on Walmart property in the United States. The term of the leases is 10 years at each station, with us holding four successive five-year extension options at each site. A majority of the leased sites have over twenty years of term remaining including renewals. The agreement permits Walmart to terminate it in its entirety, or only as to affected sites, at its option under customary circumstances (including in certain events of bankruptcy or insolvency), or if we improperly transfer the rights under the agreements to another party. In addition, the master lease agreement prohibits us from selling all or any portion of a station without first offering to sell all or such portion of the station to Walmart and provides that if Murphy Oil USA, our wholly-owned and primary operating subsidiary is acquired or becomes a party to any merger or consolidation that results in a material change in management of the stations, Walmart will have the option to purchase the stations at fair market value.

We also have four Murphy USA sites located near Walmart locations where we pay rent to other landowners.

As of December 31, 2013, we have 157 Murphy Express sites where we own the land and 25 locations where we rent the underlying land.

We have numerous sources for our retail fuel supply, including nearly all of the major and large oil companies operating in the U.S. We purchase fuel from oil companies, independent refiners, and other marketers at rates that fluctuate with market prices and generally are reset daily, and we sell fuel to our customers at prices

 

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that we establish daily. Most fuel is purchased by the truckload as needed to replenish supply at our Company stations. Our inventories of fuel on site turn approximately once daily. By establishing motor fuel supply relationships with several alternate suppliers for most locations, we believe we are able to effectively create competition for our purchases among various fuel suppliers. We also believe that purchasing arrangements with multiple fuel suppliers may help us avoid product outages during times of motor fuel supply disruptions. At some locations, however, there are limited suppliers for fuel in that market and we may have only one supplier. Our refined products are distributed through a few product distribution terminals that are wholly-owned and operated by us and from numerous terminals owned by others. About half of our wholly-owned terminals are supplied by marine transportation and the rest are supplied by pipeline. We also receive products at terminals owned by others either in exchange for deliveries from our terminals or by outright purchase.

In addition to the motor fuel sold at our Company stations, our stores carry a broad selection of snacks, beverages, tobacco products and non-food merchandise. The merchandise we offer includes our private label products, such as an isotonic drink offered in several flavors and a private label energy drink. In 2013, we purchased more than 80% of our merchandise from a single vendor, McLane Company, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of Berkshire Hathaway, Inc.

A statistical summary of key operating and financial indicators for each of the five years ended December 31, 2013 are reported below.

 

     As of December 31,  
     2013     2012     2011     2010     2009  

Branded retail outlets:

          

Murphy USA®

     1,021       1,015       1,003       1,001       996  

Murphy Express

     182       150       125       98       52  

Other (1)

     —          —          —          116       121  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total

     1,203       1,165       1,128       1,215       1,169  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Retail marketing:

          

Fuel margin per gallon (cpg) (2)

     13.0       12.9       15.6       11.4       8.3  

Gallons sold per store month

     268,458       277,001       277,715       306,646       312,493  

Merchandise sales revenue per store month

   $ 152,549       156,429       158,144       153,530       137,623  

Merchandise margin as a percentage of merchandise sales

     13.1 %     13.5 %     12.8 %     13.1 %     12.5 %

 

(1) Represents former Spur locations sold in 2011 as part of the refinery sales recorded as discontinued operations.
(2) Represents net sales prices for fuel less purchased cost of fuel.

Our business is organized into one reporting segment (Marketing). The Marketing segment includes our retail marketing sites and product supply and wholesale assets. Prior to December 2013, we also had an Ethanol segment which consisted of our ethanol production facilities located in Hankinson, North Dakota and in Hereford, Texas. The Hankinson facility was sold in December 2013. After the Hankinson facility was sold in December 2013, we reassessed our segments and due to not meeting the aggregation criteria, we have included the remainder of the former Ethanol segment in the prior “Corporate” section which has been renamed “Corporate and other assets”. Therefore, we have restated our segments for the current period and all prior periods to reflect one remaining reporting segment, Marketing. The Hereford facility began operations in early 2011 and we wrote down the carrying value at this facility at year end 2012 due to expectations of continued weak margins. We are currently considering strategic alternatives for the remaining Hereford ethanol facility. As part of this effort, we are evaluating various factors including the appropriate timing and market conditions to maximize value in any potential sale; however, a final decision has not yet been determined and this remaining ethanol asset does not meet the criteria for “held for sale” presentation at this time. Therefore, historical financial results for the Hereford plant are included in continuing operations for all periods presented.

 

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For operating segment information, see Note 20 “Business Segments” in the accompanying audited consolidated and combined financial statements for the three-year period ended December 31, 2013.

Competition

The U.S. petroleum business is highly competitive, particularly with regard to accessing and marketing petroleum and other refined products. We compete with other chains of retail fuel stations for fuel supply and in the retail sale of refined products to end consumers, primarily on the basis of price, but also on the basis of convenience and consumer appeal. In addition, we may also face competition from other retail fueling stations that adopt marketing strategies similar to ours by associating with non-traditional retailers, such as supermarkets, discount club stores and hypermarkets, particularly in the geographic areas in which we operate. We expect that our industry will continue to trend toward this model, resulting in increased competition to us over time. Moreover, because we do not produce or refine any of the petroleum or other refined products that we market and Murphy Oil does not supply us with refined products, we compete with retail gasoline companies that have ongoing supply relationships with affiliates or former affiliates that manufacture refined products. We also compete with integrated companies that have their own production and/or refining operations that are at times able to offset losses from marketing operations with profits from producing or refining operations, and may be better positioned to withstand periods of depressed retail margins or supply shortages. In addition, we compete with other retail and wholesale gasoline marketing companies that have more extensive retail outlets and greater brand name recognition. Some of our competitors have been in existence longer than we have and have greater financial, marketing and other resources than we do. As a result, these competitors may have a greater ability to bear the economic risks inherent in all phases of our business and may be able to respond better to changes in the economy and new opportunities within the industry.

In addition, the retail gasoline industry in the United States is highly competitive due to ease of entry and constant change in the number and type of retailers offering similar products and services. With respect to merchandise, our retail sites compete with other convenience store chains, independently owned convenience stores, supermarkets, drugstores, discount clubs, gasoline service stations, mass merchants, fast food operations and other similar retail outlets. In recent years, several non-traditional retailers, including supermarkets, discount club stores and mass merchants, have begun to compete directly with retail gasoline sites. These non-traditional gasoline retailers have obtained a significant share of the gasoline market, and their market share is expected to grow, and these retailers may use promotional pricing or discounts, both at the fuel pump and in the convenience store, to encourage in-store merchandise sales and gasoline sales. In addition, some large retailers and supermarkets are adjusting their store layouts and product prices in an attempt to appeal to convenience store customers. Major competitive factors include: location, ease of access, product and service selection, gasoline brands, pricing, customer service, store appearance, cleanliness and safety.

Market Conditions and Seasonality

Market conditions in the oil and gas industry are cyclical and subject to global economic and political events and new and changing governmental regulations. Our operating results are affected by price changes in crude oil, natural gas and refined products, as well as changes in competitive conditions in the markets we serve. In addition, our ethanol production operations are impacted by the price of corn, which was elevated in connection with the 2012 growing season and somewhat moderated in 2013 and may be affected by future droughts.

Oil prices, wholesale motor fuel costs, motor fuel sales volumes, motor fuel gross margins and merchandise sales can be subject to seasonal fluctuations. For example, consumer demand for motor fuel typically increases during the summer driving season, and typically falls during the winter months. Therefore, our revenues and/or sales volumes are typically higher in the second and third quarters of our fiscal year. Travel, recreation and construction are typically higher in these months in the geographic areas in which we operate, increasing the demand for motor fuel and merchandise that we sell. A significant change in any of these factors, including a

 

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significant decrease in consumer demand (other than typical seasonal variations), could materially affect our motor fuel and merchandise volumes, motor fuel gross profit and overall customer traffic, which in turn could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Trademarks

We sell gasoline primarily under the Murphy USA® and Murphy Express brands, which are trademarks of Murphy Oil. The Trademark License Agreement that we entered into with Murphy Oil in connection with the Separation contained a trademark license granting us the right to continue to use such Murphy Oil-owned trademarks throughout the term of that agreement subject to the terms and conditions therein.

In the highly competitive business in which we operate, our trade names, service marks and trademarks are important to distinguish our products and services from those of our competitors. We are not aware of any facts which would negatively impact our continuing use of any of the above trade names, service marks or trademarks.

IT Systems and Store Automation

All of our Company stations use a standard hardware and software platform for point-of-sale (“POS”) that facilitates item level scanning of merchandise for sales and inventory, and the secure acceptance of all major payment methods—cash, check, credit, debit, fleet and mobile. Our standard approach to large scale and geographically dispersed deployments reduces total IT cost of ownership for the POS and inherently makes the system easier to use, support, and replace. This POS technology strategy reflects close alignment with our growth plan.

The store back office systems run on the same platform as the POS which further leverages economies of scale to keep system costs down. The back office systems are primarily “Intranet” based web applications which are rendered through a standard web browser. These applications are a combination of software as a service (“SaaS”), commercial off the shelf software (“COTS”), and custom software applications developed using modern industry standard tools and methodologies.

Our Company stations use PDI accounting systems to manage fuel and merchandise inventory, place orders, record deposits and transmit sales to the home office. Our Company stations also use COTS workforce management and task management systems for managing store associate labor, schedules, and duties. Sophisticated systems are used to minimize store labor by automating most redundant tasks such as merchandise and fuel pricing on the POS, fuel dispensers, and price signs.

All Company stations are networked to our central servers in the corporate office. Detailed fuel sales transactions and inventory levels are processed and recorded locally, then transmitted to the corporate office each 15 to 30 minutes. The data is then fed into a centralized data warehouse, where it is combined with other sources and used to optimize fuel pricing, streamline fuel inventory management, facilitate loss prevention and optimize supply chain and distribution.

Our corporate services utilize JD Edwards, PDI Enterprise, Hyperion, SOLARC and other enterprise systems for financial reporting, accounts payable, accounts receivable, asset management, payroll, human resources, credit and risk management and other support functions. These enterprise class systems provide significant flexibility in managing corporate and store operations, as well as scalability for growth.

The on-boarding process for the entire enterprise is performed through a SaaS provider. All paperwork and associated workflow is handled electronically which reduces both store and corporate administrative costs.

We invest in disaster recovery, system backups, redundancy, firewall, remote access security and virus and spam protection to ensure a high level of system security and availability. We have systems, business policies

 

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and processes around access controls, password expirations and file retention to ensure a high level of control within our IT network.

Environmental

We are subject to numerous federal, state and local environmental laws, regulations and permits. Such environmental requirements have historically been subject to frequent change and tended to become more stringent over time. While we strive to comply with these environmental requirements, any violation of such requirements can result in litigation or the imposition of significant civil and criminal penalties, injunctions or other sanctions. Compliance with these environmental requirements affects our overall cost of business, including capital costs to construct, maintain and upgrade equipment and facilities, and ongoing operating expenditures. We maintain sophisticated leak detection and remote monitoring systems for underground storage tanks at the vast majority of our retail fueling stations. We operate above ground bulk petroleum tanks at our terminal locations and have either replaced or intend to replace underground product lines at our terminals with overhead pipelines to help mitigate the risk of potential soil and groundwater contamination. We allocate a portion of our capital expenditure program to comply with environmental laws and regulations, and such capital expenditures are projected to be $1.6 million in 2014.

We could be subject to joint and several as well as strict liability for environmental contamination. Many of our current and former properties have been operated by third-parties whose handling and management of hazardous materials were not under our control, and substantially all of them have or previously had motor fuel or petroleum product storage tanks. Pursuant to certain environmental laws, we could be responsible for remediating contamination relating to such sites, including impacts attributable to prior site occupants or other third parties, and for implementing remedial measures to mitigate the risk of future contamination. We may also have liability for contamination and violations of environmental laws under contractual arrangements with third parties, such as landlords and former owners of our sites, including at our sites in close proximity to Walmart stores. Contamination has been identified at certain of our current and former terminals and retail fueling stations, and we are continuing to conduct investigation and remediation activities in relation to such properties. The discovery of additional contamination or the imposition of further cleanup obligations at these or other properties could result in significant costs. In some cases, we may be eligible to receive money from state “leaking petroleum storage tank” trust funds to help remediate contamination at certain sites. However, receipt of such payments is subject to stringent eligibility requirements and other limitations that can significantly reduce the availability of such trust fund payments and may delay or increase the duration of associated cleanups. We could also be held responsible for contamination relating to third-party sites to which we or our predecessors have sent hazardous materials for recycling or disposal. We are currently identified as a potentially responsible party in connection with one such disposal site. Any such contamination, leaks from storage tanks or other releases of hazardous materials could result in claims against us by governmental authorities and other third parties for fines or penalties, natural resource damages, personal injury and property damage. From time to time, we are subject to legal and administrative proceedings governing the remediation of contamination or spills from current and past operations, including from our terminal operations and leaking petroleum storage tanks. For information regarding our recorded environmental liabilities, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Critical Accounting Policies—Environmental and Other Loss Contingencies.”

Consumer demand for our products may be adversely impacted by fuel economy standards as well as greenhouse gas (“GHG”) vehicle emission reduction measures. In 2010, the EPA and the Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (“NHTSA”) finalized new standards raising the required Corporate Average Fuel Economy of the nation’s passenger fleet to approximately 35 miles per gallon by 2016 and imposing the first-ever federal GHG emissions standards on cars and light trucks. In September 2011, the EPA and the Department of Transportation published first-time standards to reduce GHG emissions and fuel consumption of medium and heavy duty trucks. In August 2012, the EPA and NHTSA finalized further mandated decreases in passenger vehicle GHG emissions and increases in fuel economy

 

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beginning with 2017 model year vehicles and increasing to the equivalent of 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025. These and any future increases in fuel economy standards or GHG emission reduction requirements could decrease demand for our products.

GHG and other air emissions from our own facilities are also subject to regulation. For example, certain of our fueling stations may be required to install and maintain vapor recovery systems to control emissions of volatile organic compounds to the air during the vehicle fueling process. In addition, we are currently required to report annual GHG emissions from certain of our operations. Any existing or future GHG or other such air emission measures may result in increased compliance costs.

Our business is also subject to increasingly stringent laws and regulations governing the content and characteristics of fuel. For example, the gasoline we sell generally must meet increasingly rigorous sulfur and benzene standards. In addition, renewable fuel standards generally require refiners and gasoline blenders to meet certain volume quotas or obtain representative trading credits for renewable fuels that are established as a percentage of their finished product production. Such fuel requirements and renewable fuel standards may adversely affect our wholesale fuel purchase costs.

Sale of Regulated Products

In certain areas where our retail sites are located, state or local laws limit the hours of operation for the sale of alcoholic beverages and restrict the sale of alcoholic beverages and tobacco products to persons younger than a certain age. State and local regulatory agencies have the authority to approve, revoke, suspend or deny applications for and renewals of permits and licenses relating to the sale of alcoholic beverages, as well as to issue fines to convenience stores for the improper sale of alcoholic beverages and tobacco products. Failure to comply with these laws may result in the loss of necessary licenses and the imposition of fines and penalties on us. Such a loss or imposition could have a material adverse effect on our business, liquidity and results of operations. In many states, retailers of alcoholic beverages have been held responsible for damages caused by intoxicated individuals who purchased alcoholic beverages from them. While the potential exposure for damage claims as a seller of alcoholic beverages and tobacco products is substantial, we have adopted procedures intended to minimize such exposure.

Federally mandated anti-money laundering regulations, specifically the USA PATRIOT Act, which amends the Bank Secrecy Act, dictate the rules and documentation requirements we follow for the sales of money orders. In addition, we are subject to random anti-money laundering compliance audits. We have an anti-money laundering compliance program and have employees of the Company who review certain money order sales transactions to ensure compliance with federal regulations.

We also adhere to the rules governing lottery sales as determined by state lottery commissions in each state in which we make such sales.

Safety

We are subject to the requirements of the federal Occupational Safety and Health Act (“OSHA”) and comparable state statutes that regulate the protection of the health and safety of workers. In addition, the OSHA hazard communication standard requires that certain information be maintained about hazardous materials used or produced in our operations and that this information be provided to employees, state and local government authorities and citizens. We believe that our operations are currently in substantial compliance with OSHA requirements, including general industry standards, record-keeping requirements and monitoring of occupational exposure to regulated substances.

 

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Other Regulatory Matters

Our retail sites are also subject to regulation by federal agencies and to licensing and regulations by state and local health, sanitation, fire and other departments relating to the development and operation of retail sites, including regulations relating to zoning and building requirements and the preparation and sale of food. Difficulties in obtaining or failures to obtain the required licenses or approvals could delay or prevent the development of a new retail site in a particular area.

Our operations are also subject to federal and state laws governing such matters as wage rates, overtime and citizenship requirements. At the federal level, there are proposals under consideration from time to time to increase minimum wage rates and periods of protected leaves. Beginning in August 2014, we are required under current laws to provide a system of mandated health insurance with associated non-compliance fees applicable commencing January 2015. These legal requirements could affect our results of operations.

Employees

At December 31, 2013, we had approximately 8,250 employees, including approximately 1,900 full-time employees and 6,350 part-time employees.

Properties

Our headquarters of approximately 120,000 square feet is located at 200 Peach Street, El Dorado, Arkansas. Murphy Oil contributed this building as part of the Separation and currently is a tenant paying rent for its leased space. We also own and operate another office building in El Dorado, Arkansas that houses a portion of our operations personnel. We have numerous owned and leased properties for our retail fueling stations as described under “—Description of Our Business,” as well as wholly-owned product distribution terminals and one ethanol production facility.

LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

On January 28, 2014, we received a proposed consent agreement from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) that would impose a penalty in excess of $100,000 for the alleged deposition of dredged or fill material into certain wetlands in connection with the development of a new facility in Walton County, Florida. On February 26, 2014, we executed a final consent agreement that includes a civil penalty of $150,000, and which is currently pending public comment. We do not anticipate that the resolution of this matter will have a material impact on our results of operations or financial condition.

Murphy USA and its subsidiaries are engaged in a number of legal proceedings, all of which Murphy USA considers incidental to its business. See Note 18 “Contingencies” in the accompanying audited consolidated and combined financial statements for the three years ended December 31, 2013. Based on information currently available to the Company, the ultimate resolution of matters referred to in this item is not expected to have a material adverse effect on the Company’s net income, financial condition, or liquidity in a future period.

 

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MANAGEMENT

The age at January 1, 2014, present corporate office and length of service in office of each of the Company’s executive officers are reported in the following listing. Executive officers are elected annually but may be removed from office at any time by the Board of Directors.

R. Andrew Clyde—Age 50; President and Chief Executive Officer, Director and Member of the Executive Committee since August 2013. Mr. Clyde previously served Booz & Company (and prior to August 2008, Booz Allen Hamilton), in its global energy practice. He joined the firm in 1993 and was elected partner in 2000. From 2000 to 2013, Mr. Clyde held leadership roles as North American Energy Practice Leader and Dallas office Managing Partner and served on the firm’s board nominating committee. Mr. Clyde received a master’s degree in Management with Distinction from the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University. He received a BBA in Accounting and a minor in Geology from Southern Methodist University.

Mindy K. West—Age 44; Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer since August 2013. Ms. West joined Murphy Oil in 1996 and has held positions in Accounting, Employee Benefits, Planning and Investor Relations. In 2007, she was promoted to Vice President & Treasurer for Murphy Oil. She holds a bachelor’s degree in Finance from the University of Arkansas and a bachelor’s degree in Accounting from Southern Arkansas University. She is a Certified Public Accountant and a Certified Treasury Professional. 

John C. Rudolfs—Age 42; Executive Vice President Marketing since August 2013. From 2008 to 2009, Mr. Rudolfs was President of T-Court Investments in Washington D.C. Mr. Rudolfs joined Murphy Oil in 2010 as Vice President, Fuel for Murphy USA Marketing Company, a division of Murphy Oil USA, Inc. with over 15 years of experience in the oil and gas industry. In 2011, he was named Vice President, Real Estate & Business Development and promoted to Executive Vice President, Marketing in 2012. Mr. Rudolfs obtained a Bachelor of Science degree from the United States Naval Academy. He graduated from the United States Navy Supply Corps School with emphasis in Supply Chain Management, Finance, Accounting, and Combat Logistics. He is a retired decorated officer from the United States Navy.

Jeffery A. Goodwin—Age 55; Senior Vice President, Retail Operations since August 2013. Mr. Goodwin joined Murphy Oil in 2001 as District Manager in Jacksonville, Florida. In 2002, he was promoted to Maintenance Manager and transferred to El Dorado. He was promoted to Division Manager in 2003, then to Region Manager in 2006. In 2008, Mr. Goodwin was promoted to Vice President, Retail Operations and to Senior Vice President of Retail Operations in 2012. Mr. Goodwin holds a bachelor’s degree in Business from Widener University.

Marn K. Cheng—Age 48; Senior Vice President, Retail Operations Support since August 2013. Mr. Cheng joined Murphy Oil in 2000 as District Manager in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. He held several positions within Murphy Oil before being promoted to General Manager, Retail Marketing in 2006. In 2008, he was named Regional Vice President for Murphy USA Marketing Company, a division of Murphy Oil USA, Inc. before serving as Vice President, Retail Operations. He was promoted to Vice President, Renewable Energy for Murphy Oil USA, Inc. in 2009. He returned to the retail marketing division in 2011 as Vice President, Fuels for Murphy USA Marketing Company and was promoted to Senior Vice President of Retail Operations in 2012. Mr. Cheng graduated from Texas Tech University with a bachelor’s degree in Marketing and also holds an MBA from Texas Tech University.

John A. Moore—Age 46; Senior Vice President, General Counsel, and Secretary since August 2013. Mr. Moore joined Murphy Oil in 1995 as Associate Attorney in the Law Department. He was promoted to Attorney in 1998 and Senior Attorney in 2005. He was promoted to Manager, Law and assumed the role of Corporate Secretary for Murphy Oil in 2011. Mr. Moore holds a bachelor’s degree in Philosophy from Ouachita Baptist University and a Law degree from the University of Arkansas.

 

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DIRECTORS

Board of Directors

The following individuals serve as members of our Board of Directors.

 

Name

   Age*  

Claiborne P. Deming

     59   

Thomas M. Gattle, Jr.

     62   

Jack T. Taylor

     62   

Fred L. Holliger

     66   

James W. Keyes

     59   

Diane N. Landen

     53   

Robert A. Hermes

     74   

R. Madison Murphy

     56   

R. Andrew Clyde

     50   

The Reverend Dr. Christoph Keller, III

     59   

 

* As of March 12, 2014

Our Board of Directors is divided into three classes, each of roughly equal size. The directors designated as Class I directors have terms expiring at the first annual meeting of stockholders to be held on May 7, 2014; the directors designated as Class II directors have terms expiring at the following year’s annual meeting of stockholders; the directors designated as Class III directors have terms expiring at the following year’s annual meeting of stockholders after that. Commencing with the first annual meeting of stockholders, directors for each class will be elected at the annual meeting of stockholders held in the year in which the term for that class expires and thereafter will serve for a term of three years.

All directors, other than Mr. Clyde (our President and Chief Executive Officer), have been deemed independent by the Board based on the rules of the NYSE and the standards of independence included in the Company’s Corporate Governance Guidelines. As part of its independence recommendation to the Board, the Nominating and Governance Committee at its February meeting considered familial relationships of certain directors (Mr. Murphy is a first cousin of Mr. Deming and Rev. Christoph Keller, III).

Set forth below is additional information regarding the directors identified above, as well as a description of the specific skills and qualifications such candidates are expected to provide the Board of Directors of Murphy USA Inc.

Claiborne P. Deming (Class I) has served as Chairman of the Board of Murphy Oil since March 2012, and is also Chairman of its Executive Committee. He served as President and Chief Executive Officer of Murphy Oil from October 1, 1994 to December 31, 2008. Prior to assuming that position, he served as Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer and had served previously as President of Murphy Oil USA, Inc. Mr. Deming’s previous experience as President and Chief Executive Officer of Murphy Oil gives him insight into the Company’s challenges, opportunities and operations. Among other qualifications, Mr. Deming brings to the Board executive leadership skills and over 30 years’ experience in the oil and gas industry. Mr. Deming is a first cousin of Mr. R. Madison Murphy and Rev. Christoph Keller, III, both of whom serve on our Board.

Thomas M. Gattle, Jr. (Class I) has served as Chairman of the Board, President and Chief Executive Officer of Terral RiverService, Inc. since 1992. TerralRiverService, Inc. is a private company which employs 225 people and which operates fertilizer terminals, boats and barges on the lower Mississippi River and its connected inland waterways. Prior to his tenure at Terral RiverService, Mr. Gattle owned and operated several businesses including Terral Barge Line, which operated the Lake Providence and Madison Ports on the Mississippi River from 1980-1992 and Great River Grain from 1980-1990, which owned and operated grain elevators on the lower

 

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Mississippi River. Mr. Gattle is currently a director of American Plant Food (a private manufacturer of fertilizers), based in Houston, Texas. Mr. Gattle’s many years of experience as a successful company owner and executive officer will allow him to provide significant input to our Board on both financial and operational matters.

Jack T. Taylor (Class I) has been a director of Sempra Energy (a NYSE Fortune 500 energy services company) since February 2013 and serves as a member of the Audit; Environmental, Health, Safety and Technology; and LNG Joint Venture and Financing Committees. He has also been a director of Genesis Energy LP (a NYSE midstream energy master limited partnership) since 2013 and serves as a member of the Audit Committee and the Governance, Compensation and Business Development Committee. He was the Chief Operating Officer-Americas and Executive Vice Chair of U.S. Operations for KPMG LLP from 2005 to 2010. Mr. Taylor has extensive experience with financial and public accounting issues as well as a deep knowledge of the energy industry. He spent over 35 years as a public accountant at KPMG LLP, many of which he worked in a leadership capacity. This experience with financial and public accounting issues, together with his executive experience and knowledge of the energy industry, make him a valuable addition to our Board.

Fred L. Holliger (Class II) was Chairman and CEO of Giant Industries (a NYSE petroleum refining and retail convenience store company) from 2002 until 2007 when it was merged with Western Refining Company (a NYSE crude oil refiner and marketer). He was also an independent consultant to Western Refining Company from 2007 through June 2012. Mr. Holliger spent his entire 36-year career in the petroleum industry in a variety of engineering, marketing, supply and general management positions. His long career in the oil and gas industry, along with his leadership experience, allow him to provide valuable insight to our Board.

James W. Keyes (Class II) is currently Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Wild Oats LLC (a NASDAQ operator of natural foods stores), a position he has held since January 2012. He was Chief Executive Officer of 7-Eleven Inc. (a major retail gasoline chain) from 2000 to 2005 and held a variety of other positions prior to that in his twenty-one year career, including Chief Financial Officer and Chief Operating Officer. Mr. Keyes was Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Blockbuster (a provider of home movie and video game rental services) from 2007 to 2011 and led the company through a restructuring process that involved the successful sale of assets to Dish Networks, preserving over 19,000 jobs and providing continuity for the Blockbuster brand. Mr. Keyes’s experience running large companies, and specifically 7-Eleven, along with his leadership on the successful sale of Blockbuster’s assets to Dish Networks through its restructuring process, provide invaluable business and industry expertise to our Board.

Diane N. Landen (Class II) is owner and President of Vantage Communications, Inc. where she has over 20 years’ experience in investment management, communications, and broadcast property ownership. She also serves as Vice Chairman and Executive Vice President of Noalmark Broadcasting Corporation, which is a private radio and media company which owns and operates radio stations in multiple markets in Arkansas and New Mexico. Her responsibilities at Noalmark include oversight of the company’s corporate strategy. She is a partner at Munoco Company L.C., a private oil and gas exploration and production company. Ms. Landen also serves on the board of Loutre Land and Timber Company, a private natural resources company. She acts as Secretary of the company and serves on its Executive and Nominating Committees. She has, through her involvement in these many and varied business ventures, developed a broad range of experience in operating successful companies, allowing her to make significant contributions to our Board.

Robert A. Hermes (Class III) has been a director of Murphy Oil Corporation since 1999 and serves as a member of the Executive Committee, Nominating & Governance Committee and Environmental, Health & Safety Committee. He was Chairman of the Board of Purvin & Gertz, Inc. (an international energy consulting firm) before his retirement in 2005. Dr. Hermes has broad experience in economic and technical aspects of petroleum refining, crude oil pricing, oil logistics, petroleum marketing, and interfuel competition. He also brings to the Board expertise in strategic planning and feasibility studies. As former Chairman of the Board of Purvin & Gertz, Inc., Dr. Hermes has a strong background as an advisor on energy policy, which enables him to provide valuable advice to our Board.

 

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R. Madison Murphy (Class III) serves as the Chairman of the Board and the ex-officio of all board committees. Mr. Murphy has been a director of Murphy Oil Corporation since 1993 and serves on its Executive Committee and as Chair of the Audit Committee. He was Chairman of the board of directors of Murphy Oil from 1994 to 2004 and Chief Financial Officer of Murphy Oil from 1992 to 1994. Mr. Murphy has served on the board of directors of Deltic Timber Corporation since 1996. Mr. Murphy has also been the Managing Member of Murphy Family Management, LLC since 1998, which is engaged in investments, farm, timber and real estate operations. Mr. Murphy’s corporate experience, along with his current board service to Murphy Oil and Deltic Timber Corporation, and previous board service to BancorpSouth, Inc. (a NYSE bank holding company), brings to the Board invaluable corporate leadership and financial expertise. Mr. Murphy is a first cousin of Mr. Claiborne P. Deming and Rev. Christoph Keller, III, both of whom serve on our Board.

R. Andrew Clyde (Class III)—See “Management” in this prospectus. Mr. Clyde’s experience with downstream petroleum and retail clients on engagements focused on corporate and business unity strategy, organization design and effectiveness and performance improvement in Booz’s global energy practice makes him a valuable addition to our Board.

The Reverend Dr. Christoph Keller, III (Class III) has been a director of Deltic Timber Corporation (a NYSE natural resources and timberland company) since 1996 and is a member of the Executive Compensation Committee and Chair of the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee of Deltic Timber Corporation. He has been an Episcopal priest since 1982, and is currently Interim Dean of Trinity Episcopal Cathedral, in Little Rock. He is a member of the board of trustees of General Theological Seminary of the Episcopal Church in New York City and Episcopal Collegiate School in Little Rock. Reverend Keller has served from 1998 to 2008 as a manager of Keller Enterprises, L.L.C., a firm with farming operations and real estate and venture capital investments. He has served on its board and currently chairs its Executive Compensation Committee. Rev. Keller’s board level experience on both public and private companies, particularly his past experience on Deltic Timber’s board as it spun-off from Murphy Oil and transitioned to a public company, enables him to make valuable contributions to our Board. Rev. Keller is a first cousin of Mr. Claiborne P. Deming and Mr. R. Madison Murphy, both of whom serve on our Board.

 

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EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

Compensation Discussion and Analysis

Following its Separation from Murphy Oil, Murphy USA became an independent, publicly-traded company as of August 30, 2013. Prior to the Separation, Murphy USA comprised the “US Retail Marketing Segment” of Murphy Oil and thus Murphy Oil was responsible for all compensation decisions relating to our named executive officers (“NEOs”) based on their roles and responsibilities as part of the integrated company. This Compensation Discussion and Analysis discusses compensation provided to our NEOs by Murphy Oil prior to the Separation as well as the compensation decisions, including revised target compensation levels, made by our Executive Compensation Committee following the Separation. Our NEOs for the year ended December 31, 2013 were:

 

Name

  

Title

R. Andrew Clyde

   President & CEO

Mindy K. West

   EVP, CFO & Treasurer

John C. Rudolfs

   EVP, Marketing

John A. Moore

   SVP, General Counsel & Corporate Secretary

Jeffery A. Goodwin

   SVP, Retail Operations

This Compensation Discussion and Analysis should be read in conjunction with the tabular information included elsewhere in this prospectus. Although we have provided information on compensation of our NEOs that predates the Separation, these individuals may not have qualified as NEOs under the prior reporting structure as part of Murphy Oil. Our NEOs were determined based on total compensation paid in 2013, as shown in the 2013 Summary Compensation Table included elsewhere in this prospectus.

Overview

Murphy USA operates the nation’s fourth largest convenience store chain, with approximately 1,200 locations in 23 states, most of which are in close proximity to Walmart stores. We believe our proximity to Walmart stores generates significant traffic to our retail stations while our competitively priced gasoline and convenience offerings appeal to our shared customers. We began our relationship with Walmart in 1996 and, in December 2012, we signed a new agreement that allows us to build approximately 200 new sites at Walmart locations over the next few years.

We operate our retail gasoline stations with a strong emphasis on fuel sales complemented by a focused convenience offering that allows for a smaller store footprint than many of our competitors. Almost all of our stations are standardized 208 or 1,200 square foot stores and the majority of our stores are located on Company-owned property and do not incur any rent expense. This combination of a focused convenience offering and standardized smaller footprint stores allows us to achieve lower overhead and labor costs compared to our competitors with a larger store format.

2013 Business Highlights

Highlights of the Company during fiscal year 2013 include the following:

 

    Completed Separation from former parent Murphy Oil on August 30, 2013

 

    Established the structure for the new company which included assimilating people from both Murphy Oil and the former US Retail Marketing Segment of Murphy Oil into one cohesive organization

 

    Added 39 new retail sites to our portfolio during the year

 

    Completed the sale of our Hankinson, North Dakota ethanol facility and related assets for $173 million

 

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    Completed the sale of our North Dakota crude gathering assets formerly used to support the Superior refinery for $6 million

 

    Continued our 50+ quarter streak of quarter-over-quarter non-tobacco merchandise margin growth

Executive Compensation Philosophy and Objectives

The Executive Compensation Committee bases its executive compensation decisions on principles designed to align the interests of executives with those of our stockholders. The Executive Compensation Committee believes compensation should provide a direct link with the Company’s values, objectives, business strategies, and financial results. In order to motivate, attract, and retain key executives who are critical to its long-term success, the Company aims to provide pay packages that are competitive with others in the retail industry. In addition, the Company believes that executives should be rewarded for both the short and long-term success of the Company and, conversely, be subject to a degree of downside risk in the event that the Company does not achieve its performance objectives.

Compensation Design Principles and Governance Practices

The Executive Compensation Committee intends for its compensation design principles to protect and promote our shareholders’ interests. Below we summarize certain practices we have implemented to drive performance and those we have not implemented because we do not believe they would serve our shareholders’ long-term interests.

 

What We Do

  

What We Don’t Do

Ö      Pay for performance

  

×       Maintain employment contracts

Ö      Perform an annual compensation risk assessment

  

×       Maintain separate change in control (“CIC”) agreements other than with the CEO

Ö      Utilize an independent compensation consultant

  

Ö      Provide modest perquisites

  

×       Provide excise tax gross ups on perquisites or CIC benefits

Ö      Maintain share ownership guidelines and restrict pledging

  

×       Allow repricing of underwater options

Ö      Prohibit hedging transactions by executives

  

×       Allow current payment of dividends or dividend equivalents on unearned long-term incentives

Ö      Include “clawbacks” in our annual and long-term incentive plans

  

The Compensation Process

Although the compensation programs and philosophy established by Murphy Oil formed the basis of the executive compensation programs for Murphy USA executive officers in 2013, our Executive Compensation Committee made adjustments to the targeted total direct compensation (base salary, annual bonus targets, and long-term incentive targets) for certain officers following the Separation. These adjustments were made to help ensure that compensation levels provided to our executive officers were reasonable, competitive, and appropriate for an independent retail gasoline marketing company.

 

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Role of the Compensation Committee

The Executive Compensation Committee has responsibility for discharging the Board of Directors’ responsibilities with respect to compensation of the Company’s executives. In particular, the Executive Compensation Committee annually reviews and approves corporate goals and objectives relevant to CEO compensation, evaluates the CEO’s performance in light of those goals and objectives, and determines and approves the CEO’s compensation based on this evaluation. In doing so, the Executive Compensation Committee reviews all elements of the CEO’s compensation. The Executive Compensation Committee also approves non-CEO executive compensation, approves and administers incentive compensation and equity-based plans, and monitors compliance of Directors and executive officers with Company stock ownership requirements. Pursuant to its charter, the Executive Compensation Committee has the sole authority to retain and terminate compensation consultants as well as internal and external legal, accounting and other advisors, including sole authority to approve the advisors’ fees and other engagement terms.

Benchmarking

The Executive Compensation Committee adopted a peer group for purposes of reviewing and approving post-Separation 2013 compensation. Due to the relatively small number of publicly-traded retail convenience store competitors, to create a sufficient sample of companies against which compensation can be compared the group was broadened to include other companies in similar industries with which Murphy USA competes for executive talent. The peer group was developed based on certain attributes including:

 

    Industry Sector: Direct motor fuel and convenience retailers, retailers exposed to vehicle miles traveled (or “VMT”), and other small box common goods retailers (e.g., quick serve restaurants or “QSRs”)

 

    Scale of Operation: Revenue, non-fuel revenue, earnings (i.e., earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization or “EBITDA”), market capitalization, number of employees, and store count

 

    Method of Operation: Company-operated sites and direct-owned real estate

The peer group consists of the following companies:

 

•   Alimentation Couche-Tard

  

•   Cracker Barrel

   •   The Pantry

•   Advance Auto Parts

  

•   CST Brands

   •   Pier 1 Imports

•   AutoZone

  

•   Foot Locker

   •   Susser Holdings

•   Bob Evans Farms

  

•   GameStop

   •   TravelCenters of America

•   Casey’s General Stores

  

•   Monro Muffler Brake

   •   Vitamin Shoppe

•   Chipotle Mexican Group

  

•   O’Reilly Automotive

  

In addition to comparator company information, the Executive Compensation Committee uses several industry compensation surveys to determine competitive market pay levels for the NEOs.

Base salaries and total target direct compensation for the Company’s NEOs were compared to the median of the benchmark data to determine whether the Company’s compensation practices aligned with market data. However, the Executive Compensation Committee does not target a particular percentage of the market when making compensation-related decisions. The Executive Compensation Committee believes that such decisions require a deliberate review of market competition for a particular position as well as each individual’s possession of a unique skill or knowledge set, proven leadership capabilities or experience, and Company performance. Based on such factors, the Executive Compensation Committee may determine in respect of one or more individuals that it is appropriate for compensation to meet, exceed, or fall below the median of the benchmark data with respect to a particular compensation element or total compensation.

 

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Role of the CEO in Compensation Decisions

The CEO periodically reviews the performance of each of the NEOs, excluding himself, develops preliminary recommendations regarding salary adjustments and annual and long-term award amounts, and provides these recommendations to the Executive Compensation Committee. The Executive Compensation Committee can exercise its discretion in modifying any recommendations and makes the final decisions.

Elements of Compensation

Our compensation program is comprised of three key components, each designed to be market-competitive and to help attract, motivate, retain, and reward our NEOs.

 

Element

  

Key Characteristics

  

Objectives

Base Salary

  

•   Fixed minimum level of compensation

  

•   To reward the executive for day-to-day execution of primary duties and responsibilities

  

•   Reviewed annually and adjusted if and when appropriate

  

•   To provide a foundation level of compensation upon which incentive opportunities can be added to provide the motivation to deliver superior performance

Annual

Incentives

  

•   Variable cash compensation component

  

•   To motivate and reward NEOs for achieving annual business goals

  

•   Performance-based award opportunity based on annual operational and individual performance

  

•   To align the interests of those who hold positions of major responsibility with the interests of stockholders

     

•   Intended to encourage responsible risk taking and accountability

Long-term

Incentives

  

•   Variable equity-based compensation component

  

•   To align executives’ interests with the interests of stockholders

  

•   Performance-based award opportunity based on long-term performance

  

•   To reinforce the critical objective of building stockholder value over the long term

     

•   To focus management attention upon the execution of the long-term business strategy

The majority of our NEO compensation is performance-based and is issued in the form of both short and long-term incentives. Individuals in a position to influence the growth of stockholder wealth have larger portions of their total compensation delivered in the form of equity-based long-term incentives. The target mix of the

 

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compensation program elements for the CEO and other NEOs is shown below. The charts outline the size, in percentage terms, of each element of target compensation.

 

LOGO

A.    Base Salary

Base salary is designed to provide a competitive fixed rate of pay recognizing each employee’s different level of responsibility and performance. In setting base salary levels for NEOs, the Executive Compensation Committee considers competitive market data in addition to other factors such as duties and responsibilities, experience, individual performance, retention concerns, internal equity considerations, Company performance, general economic conditions, and marketplace compensation trends.

With the exception of the CEO, the Executive Compensation Committee increased base salaries awarded to each NEO following the Separation to bring salaries closer to market levels and to reflect increased job responsibilities resulting from their new roles in a newly-established, standalone public company. The following table shows the base salaries in effect for each of the NEOs in 2013 both prior to and after the Separation:

 

Name

 

Title

  Pre-Spin Salary     Post-Spin Salary  

R. Andrew Clyde (1)

  President & CEO   $ 750,000      $ 750,000   

Mindy K. West

  EVP, CFO & Treasurer   $ 350,000      $ 450,000   

John C. Rudolfs

  EVP, Marketing   $ 330,720      $ 400,000   

John A. Moore

  SVP, General Counsel & Corporate Secretary   $ 296,500      $ 365,000   

Jeffery A. Goodwin

  SVP, Retail Operations   $ 260,000      $ 320,000   

 

(1) Mr. Clyde was an employee of Booz & Company until August 1, 2013.

B.    Annual Incentive Plan

The primary objective of our annual incentive plan is to align corporate and individual goals with stockholder interests and Company strategy and to reward employees for their performance relative to those goals. Murphy USA targets the median of competitive market pay levels for annual target incentive compensation. Executives have the opportunity to be compensated above the median of market pay levels when Murphy USA performs above market based on established performance measures.

With the exception of the CEO, the target bonus as a percentage of salary for each NEO was increased following the Separation to reflect market levels of target annual incentives in their new expanded roles. The

 

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following table shows the target bonuses as a percentage of salary in effect for each of the NEOs in 2013 both before and after the Separation:

 

Name

 

Title

  Pre-Spin Target as a
% of Salary
    Post-Spin Target as a
% of Salary
 

R. Andrew Clyde

  President & CEO     100     100

Mindy K. West

  EVP, CFO & Treasurer     50     75

John C. Rudolfs

  EVP, Marketing     40     65

John A. Moore

  SVP, General Counsel & Corporate Secretary     40     60

Jeffery A. Goodwin

  SVP, Retail Operations     40     60

Pre-Separation

During the first eight months of 2013, the NEOs (including Mr. Clyde who was deemed a participant) were subject to the terms and conditions of the Murphy Oil 2012 Annual Incentive Plan (the “Murphy Oil AIP”).

For 2013, the performance criteria for employees of the corporate segment of Murphy Oil (including Ms. West and Mr. Moore) consisted of a combination of return on capital employed (“ROCE”)1, a safety metric (total recordable incident rate, or “TRIR”), upstream operating metrics, and return on average capital employed (“ROACE”)2 for the US Retail Marketing Segment of Murphy Oil. The following table summarizes the performance metrics and corresponding weightings used in determining annual incentive award payouts for the corporate segment of Murphy Oil and the weighted performance scores for each based on actual performance:

 

Metric

   Weighting     Target     Actual     Payout
% of
Target
    Weighted
Performance
Score
 

ROCE

     50     8.00     9.13     135     67.66

Production

     20     193,768        196,692        107     21.46

TRIR

     10     0.90        0.75        150     15.00

Reserves Replacement

     10     150     240     200     20.00

US Retail Marketing Segment ROACE

     10     9.00     13.80     200     20.00
          

 

 

 

Total

             144.12
          

 

 

 

Results were certified by the Executive Compensation Committee of Murphy Oil. Payouts were made in February 2014 based on actual performance. Ms. West and Mr. Moore received payouts related to this level of achievement for the first eight months of 2013.

Employees of the former US Retail Marketing Segment of Murphy Oil prior to the Separation (including Mr. Clyde, Mr. Rudolfs, and Mr. Goodwin) were subject to the terms and conditions of the Murphy Oil AIP with performance measured against metrics for the former US Retail Marketing Segment of Murphy Oil (discussed below).

 

1  ROCE is computed as a percentage based on dividing the sum of (i) Murphy Oil’s annual net income, as adjusted from time-to-time for certain unusual and nonrecurring gains or losses and (ii) Murphy Oil’s after-tax net interest expense, by the sum of (a) the balance of Murphy Oil’s consolidated stockholders’ equity at January 1 of the respective year and (b) the average of Murphy Oil’s beginning and ending long-term debt during the respective year.
2  ROACE is computed as a percentage based on dividing the US Retail Marketing Segment’s earnings before interest and taxes, as adjusted from time-to-time for certain unusual and nonrecurring gains or losses by the sum of (a) the average of the US Retail Marketing Segment’s beginning and ending balance of property, plant, and equipment during the respective year and (b) the average of the US Retail Marketing Segment’s beginning and ending net working capital position during the respective year; excludes impact of ethanol facilities.

 

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Post-Separation

Subsequent to the Separation, the NEOs (including former Murphy Oil employees that joined Murphy USA) were subject to the terms and conditions of the Murphy Oil AIP based on the metrics for the former US Retail Marketing Segment established at the beginning of 2013. Since the Murphy Oil AIP program as it related to the former US Retail Marketing Segment of Murphy Oil was not terminated or paid out as a result of the Separation, its metrics were reviewed by our Executive Compensation Committee and found to be appropriate for the remainder of 2013.

For 2013, the AIP metrics for Murphy USA employees included ROACE, TRIR, and profitability as measured by both fuel and merchandise gross margin. The following table summarizes performance metrics and corresponding weightings used in determining annual incentive award payouts for Murphy USA employees and the weighted performance scores for each based on actual performance during 2013:

 

                   Results through August      Results through Year-End  

Metric

   Weighting
(%)
     Target
(%)
     Actual
(%)
     Payout
% of
Target
(%)
     Weighted
Performance
Score
(%)
     Actual
(%)
     Payout
% of
Target
(%)
     Weighted
Performance
Score
(%)
 

ROACE

     30         9.0         13.8         200         60.0         14.6         200         60.0   

Fuel Gross Margin ($000s) (average per store month)

     30         31.7         36.3         200         60.0         35.3         173         51.9   

Merchandise Gross Margin ($000s) (average per store month)

     30         20.9         20.0         —           0.0         20.0         —           —     

Downstream TRIR

     10         1.2         0.97         138         13.8         1.09         118         11.8   

Under the terms of the awards, achievement of 100% of the target for any metric results in the payment of 100% of target for that metric. Achievement of the minimum level of the performance range results in the payment of 50% of target and achievement of the maximum results in the payment of 200% of target. No awards relative to a given metric are payable if performance for that metric falls below the minimum. Results between points will be interpolated.

After certifying the results relative to our performance metrics, our Executive Compensation Committee (in combination with the Murphy Oil Executive Compensation Committee, where applicable) approved the following payments for our NEOs for 2013:

 

     Pre-Separation Paid by MOC      Post-Separation Paid by MUSA      Total  

Name

   Target
Bonus
($)
     Weighted
Performance
Score
(%)
     Actual
Bonus
($)
     Target
Bonus
($)
     Weighted
Performance
Score
(%)
     Actual
Bonus
($)
     Target
Bonus
($)
     Actual
Bonus
($)
 

R. Andrew Clyde

     500,000         133.8         750,000         250,000         123.7         309,250         750,000         1,059,250   

Mindy K. West

     115,600         144.1         199,909         112,500         123.7         139,163         228,100         339,072   

John C. Rudolfs

     86,920         133.8         116,299         86,667         123.7         107,207         173,587         223,506   

John A. Moore

     78,588         144.1         130,242         73,000         123.7         90,301         151,588         220,543   

Jeffery A. Goodwin

     68,333         133.8         91,430         64,000         123.7         79,168         132,333         170,598   

The Executive Compensation Committee of Murphy Oil had the right to exercise both positive and negative discretion to adjust payout levels by up to 25% based on individual qualitative results. The actual bonus payouts for Mr. Clyde, Ms. West, and Mr. Moore incorporate such adjustments related to each of these individuals’ outstanding contributions to both the successful execution of the Separation as well as the company’s performance throughout the year. The Executive Compensation Committee has only negative discretion when determining payout levels for the NEOs under the Murphy USA Inc. 2013 Annual Incentive Plan, as amended and restated as of February 12, 2014 (the “2013 AIP”).

 

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Note that the table above reflects the total annual incentive payouts received by each of our NEOs for performance during 2013. Murphy USA was responsible only for the last four months of 2013 (i.e., post-Separation). Prior parent Murphy Oil awarded payouts related to the first eight months of 2013.

Special Bonuses

In rare circumstances, the Executive Compensation Committee also has the ability to award special achievement bonuses, separate and apart from the AIP, where circumstances warrant. During 2013, Mr. Clyde and Ms. West received special bonuses in recognition of their contributions towards the success of the Separation and exemplary performance throughout the transition process. The amount awarded was net of the individual adjustments awarded by MOC for the first eight months of 2013.

C. Long-term Incentive Compensation

Long-term incentives are designed to (i) align corporate and individual goals with stockholder interests and Company strategy and vision and (ii) support retention. Prior to the Separation, the NEOs were covered under Murphy Oil’s 2007 Long-Term Incentive Plan (the “2007 LTIP”) and its 2012 Long-Term Incentive Plan (the “2012 LTIP,” which replaced the 2007 LTIP after the 2012 LTIP’s approval at the 2012 Murphy Oil Annual Meeting). On February 5, 2013, as part of a routine annual grant, Murphy Oil granted long-term incentive awards to our NEOs (other than Mr. Clyde) with the value either divided equally between stock options and performance-based restricted stock units (“RSUs”) (for Ms. West and Mr. Moore) or, in the case of employees of the former US Retail Marketing Segment of Murphy Oil (including Mr. Rudolfs and Mr. Goodwin), solely in the form of cash-based performance units. Upon commencing his employment with Murphy USA, Mr. Clyde received a grant of Murphy Oil options and performance-based RSUs on August 6, 2013. The terms and conditions of Mr. Clyde’s awards were generally identical to those granted to the other Murphy Oil executives (including Ms. West and Mr. Moore) on February 5, 2013.

As a result of the Separation, unvested options held by Murphy USA employees were forfeited and replaced with options to purchase shares of Murphy USA under the Murphy USA Inc. 2013 Long-Term Incentive Plan, as amended and restated effective as of February 12, 2014 (the “2013 LTIP”). Outstanding performance-based RSUs and performance units were paid out by Murphy Oil on a pro-rata basis based on actual performance through August 30, 2013 (discussed below). Subsequent to our Separation, the Executive Compensation Committee granted replacement RSUs to our NEOs under the 2013 LTIP intended to replace the forfeited portion of awards that were terminated and paid out on a pro-rata basis. The number of equivalent Murphy USA options and RSUs granted as replacement awards for those originally granted by Murphy Oil during 2013 are as follows:

 

Name

   Options
(#)
     RSUs
(#)
 

R. Andrew Clyde

     118,499         25,099   

Mindy K. West

     65,007         14,171   

John C. Rudolfs

     —           5,396   

John A. Moore

     27,233         5,612   

Jeffery A. Goodwin

     —           3,597   

Stock Options

Stock options provide a direct link between executive officer compensation and the value delivered to shareholders. Our Executive Compensation Committee believes that stock options are inherently performance-based, as option holders only realize benefits if the value of our stock increases following the date of grant. All grants of options will vest in two equal installments on the second and third anniversaries of the grant date, and unless otherwise forfeited or exercised, expire seven years from the date of the grant.

 

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Performance-based RSUs

The vesting of performance-based RSUs awarded in 2013 was based upon Murphy Oil’s total shareholder return (“TSR”) relative to the TSR of Murphy Oil’s 15-company peer group. The 2013 performance-based RSU awards contained four equally-weighted measurement periods, all of which were eligible to vest at the end of the three-year performance period based on Murphy Oil’s TSR performance relative to the TSR of the 15 peer companies. Actual payouts could vary from 0% to 150% of target based on Murphy Oil’s relative TSR ranking for the measurement period. Dividend equivalents were accumulated during the performance period and were paid only if the underlying units vested.

Performance Units

The vesting of cash-based performance units awarded in 2013 was based on the performance of the former US Retail Marketing Segment of Murphy Oil, as measured by two equally-weighted metrics: ROACE and EBITDA. Similar to performance-based RSUs, the performance units were originally eligible to vest at the end of three years and contained four equally-weighted measurement periods. Actual payouts could vary from 0% to 200% of target based on the performance of the former US Retail Marketing Segment of Murphy Oil for the measurement period. The value of each performance unit was $100.

Actions as a Result of the Separation

In accordance with the Employee Matters Agreement (“EMA”) with Murphy Oil, outstanding equity awards held by the NEOs at the time of the Separation were adjusted or forfeited and replaced as described below in order to preserve the intrinsic value, remaining vesting periods, and other terms and conditions of Murphy Oil awards that were outstanding on August 30, 2013. A copy of the EMA was attached as an exhibit to a Current Report on Form 8-K filed by us with the SEC on September 5, 2013.

Stock Options

In connection with the Separation, vested Murphy Oil stock options held by employees of Murphy USA were adjusted to preserve the intrinsic value of each original option grant as well as the ratio of the exercise price to the fair market value of Murphy Oil common stock on the date of the Separation (as defined in the EMA). Unvested Murphy Oil stock options held by employees of Murphy USA were forfeited. To retain the intrinsic value to which they were entitled prior to the Separation, Murphy USA employees were issued replacement options in Murphy USA which preserved both (1) the ratio of exercise price to stock price of each original option/SAR and (2) the intrinsic embedded value of the original options/SARs on the Separation date. At the time of the Separation, three groups of option grants were unvested and outstanding: 50% of the 2011 grants, 100% of the 2012 grants, and 100% of the 2013 grants.

The replacement options have the same terms and conditions as the original Murphy Oil options. The number of replacement options issued to each of the NEOs was as follows:

 

     Replacement Options Issued for Options
Originally Granted In
 

Name

   2011
(#)
     2012
(#)
     2013
(#)
     Total
(#)
 

R. Andrew Clyde

     —           —           118,499         118,499   

Mindy K. West

     24,158         61,493         65,007         150,658   

John A. Moore

     4,392         17,569         27,233         49,194   

As employees of the Murphy Oil’s former US Retail Marketing Segment, Mr. Rudolfs and Mr. Goodwin were not eligible to receive stock option grants and thus did not receive any replacement options.

 

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Performance-based RSUs and Performance Units

In connection with the Separation, Murphy Oil approved pro-rata payments related to all outstanding performance-based RSUs and performance units based on actual performance through the date of the Separation. At the time of the Separation, three grants were outstanding: awards granted in 2011 for the 2011-2013 performance period; 2012 grants for the 2012-2014 performance period; and 2013 grants for the 2013-2015 performance period.

Murphy Oil determined the value of the performance-based RSUs by comparing the TSR of Murphy Oil to the TSR of each of the peer companies in accordance with the program design. However, the effective date of the Separation rather than the end of each of the three-year performance periods was used as the ending measurement date for the relevant performance period for purposes of this calculation. Similarly, the value of the performance units was determined using actual performance of the former US Retail Marketing Segment relative to the internal goals developed at the time of grant through the date of the Separation.

Each holder of performance-based RSUs and performance units received a payment (in Murphy Oil shares for performance-based RSUs, and in cash for performance units) from Murphy Oil based on actual performance through the date of the Separation and the portion of the performance period already completed. Portions relating to periods which had not yet lapsed were forfeited.

To retain the intrinsic value to which they were entitled prior to the Separation, participants were issued time-vesting RSU grants in Murphy USA representing the forfeited opportunity for each of the 2011, 2012, and 2013 cycles of performance-based RSUs and performance units held by the NEOs. The replacement RSUs originally granted will vest according to the original schedule (i.e., the 2013-2015 awards will vest three years from the date of grant, or February 5, 2016) allowing Murphy USA to benefit from the retentive feature of the awards. The number of replacement RSUs issued was determined based on the closing Murphy USA stock price on the date of grant:

 

     Replacement RSUs Issued for RSUs /
Performance Units Originally Granted
 

Name

   2011 – 2013
(#)
     2012 – 2014
(#)
     2013 – 2015
(#)
     Total
(#)
 

R. Andrew Clyde

     —           —           25,099         25,099   

Mindy K. West

     1,809         9,554         14,171         25,534   

John C. Rudolfs

     886         938         5,396         7,220   

John A. Moore

     517         5,732         5,612         11,861   

Jeffery A. Goodwin

     739         782         3,597         5,118   

The replacement stock options and RSUs were made pursuant to the terms and conditions of our 2013 LTIP and award agreements, the forms of which were approved and adopted by our Executive Compensation Committee.

Other Awards

Certain executives, including three NEOs, were disadvantaged in regards to pension benefits after joining Murphy USA as the Separation resulted in the inability to continue earning benefits under the Murphy Oil defined benefit plan. In order to make up for these lost benefits, the applicable NEOs received a time-based RSU award equivalent to the present day value of the difference between (i) the lump sum value at age 62 under the Murphy Oil defined benefit plan using pre-Separation salary and bonus and (ii) the lump sum value at age 62 of

 

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the new Murphy USA profit-sharing plan using post-Separation salary and target bonus. The following number of pension restoration RSUs were issued to the affected NEOs on September 6, 2013:

 

Name

   Pension
Restoration
RSUs (#)
 

Mindy K. West

     17,981   

John A. Moore

     10,101   

Jeffery A. Goodwin

     6,396   

For Mr. Moore and Mr. Goodwin, the RSUs will vest in equal parts after five and ten years. For Ms. West, roughly 30% of the RSUs will vest after five years with the remaining RSUs vesting after 10 years. The vesting period was selected to generally correspond with the number of years the individuals would have originally needed to remain in the employ of Murphy Oil to earn the higher benefit.

In addition, Ms. West also received a RSU grant to replace the value of lost potential compensation as a result of joining MUSA rather than remaining at Murphy Oil. Due to differences in pay practices in the retail and exploration and production industries, Ms. West’s post-Separation total target compensation is below that of her pre-Separation total target compensation at Murphy Oil. In order to make-up for the loss, Ms. West received 33,414 lost potential compensation RSUs, the grant date fair value of which is equivalent to the present value of five years of the difference between (i) the total target compensation that she would have received had she remained at Murphy Oil, and (ii) her total target compensation at Murphy USA post-Separation. The RSUs will cliff vest five years from the date of grant.

D.    Employee Benefits and Perquisites

Murphy USA’s executives are provided usual and customary employee benefits available to all employees (except certain hourly retail employees). These include qualified defined contribution (thrift) plan (401(k)), health insurance, life insurance, accidental death and dismemberment insurance, medical/dental insurance, vision insurance, and long-term disability insurance.

Murphy USA provides a Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan (“Murphy USA SERP”), an unfunded, nonqualified defined contribution plan to eligible executives including the NEOs. The Murphy USA SERP is intended to restore to certain highly-compensated individuals qualified defined contribution (thrift and profit-sharing) plan benefits restricted under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (the “IRC”).

Murphy USA offers limited perquisites to our NEOs consistent with our peer group. The Board of Directors has authorized up to 50 hours annually of personal use of Company aircraft for our CEO as part of his total compensation package. The value of such personal use is periodically reported to the Executive Compensation Committee and will be reported as taxable income to the CEO with no income tax assistance or gross-ups provided by the Company.

Reportable values for these programs based on the incremental costs to the Company are included in the “All Other Compensation” column of the 2013 Summary Compensation Table included elsewhere in this prospectus.

Other Policies

Severance and Change in Control Protection

The Company has not entered into any employment agreements with its NEOs.

Mr. Clyde is party to a Severance Protection Agreement (the “SPA”) provided to him by Murphy Oil when he joined Murphy Oil in August 2013, and was inherited by Murphy USA in connection with the Separation. The

 

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SPA provides certain severance benefits if his employment is terminated within 24 months following a CIC. If Mr. Clyde’s employment is terminated by Murphy USA “without cause” or by Mr. Clyde for “good reason” within this 24-month window, Mr. Clyde will be entitled to his earned but unpaid compensation, a lump sum severance payment equal to three times the sum of his base salary and the average of his last three annual bonuses prior to the termination date (or, if higher, prior to the CIC), accelerated vesting of his outstanding equity-based awards (provided that any performance-based awards be paid assuming the target level of performance) and continued life, accident, and health insurance benefits for 36 months. Mr. Clyde will not be entitled to any “golden parachute” excise tax gross-up payments. The SPA provides for an excise tax cutback to reduce payments to a level such that the excise tax under Sections 280G and 4999 of the IRC will not apply (unless the executive would receive a greater amount of severance benefits on an after-tax basis without a cutback, in which case the cutback will not apply). Pursuant to the SPA, Mr. Clyde will be subject to a non-disclosure covenant and non-solicitation and non-competition restrictive covenants for 12 months following any such termination.

Under the terms of the Company’s 2013 LTIP, in the event of a CIC, all outstanding equity awards will vest, become immediately exercisable or payable, and/or have all restrictions lifted (any performance-based awards will be paid assuming the target level of performance).

Stock Ownership Guidelines

To further align the interest of our executive officers with those of our shareholders, the Board of Directors expects all executive officers to display confidence in the Company through the ownership of a significant amount our stock. Under these guidelines as set forth in the Company’s Corporate Governance Guidelines, executive officers, including our NEOs, are expected to hold Murphy USA common stock having a value that is equivalent to a multiple of each executive officer’s annualized base salary. The targeted multiples vary among the executives depending upon their position:

 

    CEO: 5x annual salary

 

    EVPs: 3x annual salary

 

    SVPs: 2x annual salary

 

    VPs: 1x annual salary

Because the stock ownership guidelines are a multiple of each executive officer’s annualized salary, the value that must be maintained will increase proportionally with salary increases. Executive officers are expected to achieve targets within five years of assuming their positions. The Executive Compensation Committee will periodically assess these guidelines, monitor the executive officers’ ownership levels relative to these guidelines, and make recommendations as appropriate.

The Board of Directors has also established stock ownership guidelines for non-employee Directors of the company. Directors are expected to achieve ownership of at least three times the annual cash retainer within five years of service.

A Director or executive officer may not pledge Company securities, either by purchasing Company securities on margin or holding Company securities in a margin account, until he or she has achieved the applicable stock ownership target specified in the guidelines above.

Prohibition on Hedging

In order to ensure that Murphy USA executive officers, including our NEOs, bear the full risks of Murphy USA common stock ownership, the Company has adopted a policy that prohibits hedging transactions that are designed to hedge or speculate on any change in the market value of the Company’s securities.

 

 

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Recoupment/Clawback Policy

Our executive officers are subject to recoupment provisions in both the 2013 AIP and 2013 LTIP programs in the case of certain forfeiture events. If the Company restates its financial statements as a result of negligent, intentional, or gross misconduct by the recipient, the Executive Compensation Committee may, in its discretion, require that the recipient reimburse the Company in respect of any shares issued or payments made under the 2013 AIP and/or the 2013 LTIP in the period covered by the restated financial statements.

Tax Policy

Section 162(m) of the IRC limits the deductibility of compensation paid to certain NEOs to $1 million annually unless compensation is performance-based and the performance criteria are approved by stockholders.

The Executive Compensation Committee considers this impact when making compensation decisions and attempts to structure all elements of executive compensation to meet this exception. However, the Executive Compensation Committee has retained the flexibility to design and maintain the executive compensation programs in a manner that is most beneficial overall to stockholders, including the payment of compensation that is subject to the deduction limits under IRC Section 162(m).

The Board of Directors has submitted for your approval the performance criteria of the 2013 AIP and 2013 LTIP in order to qualify awards and payments made under each as performance-based under IRC Section 162(m).

Role of the Compensation Consultant

In anticipation of the Separation, Mercer (US) Inc. (“Mercer”) was retained by the Executive Compensation Committee as its independent compensation consultant during 2013. Mercer provides executive and director compensation consulting services to the Executive Compensation Committee, regularly attends Committee meetings, reports directly to the Executive Compensation Committee on matters relating to compensation for our NEOs, and participates in executive sessions without NEOs present. Mercer provides advice and analysis to the Executive Compensation Committee on design and level of executive and director compensation. In connection with their services to the Executive Compensation Committee, Mercer works with executive management and the corporate human resources team group to formalize proposals for the Executive Compensation Committee. The Executive Compensation Committee has assessed the independence of Mercer pursuant to SEC rules and concluded that Mercer’s work for the Executive Compensation Committee does not raise any conflict of interest.

Compensation-based Risk Assessment

In February 2014, the Executive Compensation Committee completed a review of the Company’s policies and practices of compensating its employees (including non-executives) as they relate to the Company’s risk management profile to determine whether such policies and practices create risks that are reasonably likely to have a material adverse effect on the Company. As a result of this review, the Executive Compensation Committee concluded that any risks arising from the Company’s compensation policies and practices for its employees were not reasonably likely to have a material adverse effect on the Company.

 

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Tabular Information for Named Executive Officers

Further information with respect to the individuals who served as the Company’s Principal Executive Officer, Principal Financial Officer, and the three other most highly compensated executive officers serving at the end of the last completed fiscal year (collectively, the NEOs) is set forth in the following tables:

2013 Summary Compensation Table

 

Name and
Principal
Position

   Year     Salary (1)
($)
    Bonus
($)
    Stock
Awards
($)
    Option
Awards
($)
    Non-Equity
Incentive
Plan
Compensation
($)
    Change in
Pension

Value
and
Nonqualified
Deferred
Compensation
Earnings
($)
    All
Other
Compensation
($)
    Total
($)
 

R. Andrew Clyde

     2013        420,417 (9)      40,750 (2)      1,173,184  (3)(4)      1,390,737  (4)(5)      1,059,250  (6)      —          74,547  (8)      4,158,885   

President & Chief

Executive Officer

     2012  (10)      —          —          —          —          —          —          —          —     

Mindy K. West

     2013        381,200        35,000  (2)      2,602,253  (3)(4)      584,970  (4)(5)      339,072  (6)      —          36,352  (8)      3,978,847   

Executive Vice

President, Chief

Financial Officer

& Treasurer

     2012  (10)      320,835        —          592,650        620,900        178,123        277,071        20,090        2,009,669   

John C. Rudolfs

     2013        350,633        —          225,000  (3)(4)      —          504,554  (6)      5,111  (7)      3,908  (8)      1,089,206   

Executive Vice

President,

Marketing

     2012  (10)      280,600        —          —          —          79,971        49,132        44,183        453,886   

John A. Moore

     2013        318,138        —          599,680  (3)(4)      245,055  (4)(5)      220,543        28,247  (7)      27,292  (8)      1,438,955   

Senior Vice

President,

General

Counsel &

Secretary

     2012  (10)      279,123        —          355,590        177,400        109,092        264,754        17,589        1,203,538   

Jeffery A. Goodwin

     2013        277,500        —          225,000  (3)(4)      —          393,973  (6)      18,901  (7)      17,946  (8)      933,320   

Senior Vice

President, Retail

Operations

     2012  (10)      235,143        —          —          —          67,016        170,256        14,949        487,364   

 

(1) The salaries shown in this column for 2013 reflect eight months at the pre-Separation annualized salary rate and four months at the post-Separation annualized salary rate.
(2) Includes value of special bonuses awarded in recognition of their contributions towards the success of the Separation and exemplary performance throughout the transition process.
(3) The amounts shown represent the grant date fair value of performance-based RSUs and performance units granted by Murphy Oil as well as the pension restoration and lost potential compensation RSUs granted by Murphy USA. Amounts shown are computed in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 718, excluding forfeiture estimates, as more fully described in Note 11 to our consolidated and combined financial statements included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2013.
(4) The sum of the values in the “Stock Awards” and “Option Awards” columns shown here differ somewhat from the total grant date fair value of option and stock awards in the “Grant Date Fair Value of Stock and Option Awards” column of the “Grants of Plan Based Awards Table” included elsewhere in this prospectus. The grant date fair value of replacement options and RSUs offset the grant date fair value of awards previously recognized by Murphy Oil and transferred to Murphy USA upon the Separation. No incremental accounting expense was incurred in connection with the replacement awards and thus amounts shown here reflect only the grant date fair value of awards granted by Murphy Oil in 2013 and the pension restoration and lost potential compensation RSUs granted by Murphy USA (i.e., excludes the grant date fair value of replacement awards which, for presentation purposes, are included in the “Grant Date Fair Value of Stock and Option Awards” column of the “Grants of Plan Based Awards Table” included elsewhere in this prospectus).
(5) The amounts shown represent the grant date fair value of options granted by Murphy Oil as computed in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 718, excluding forfeiture estimates, as more fully described in Note 11 to our consolidated and combined financial statements included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2013.
(6) Reflects amounts paid under our 2013 AIP, which were paid in February 2014, as well as the cash value awarded by Murphy Oil to Messrs. Rudolfs and Goodwin in connection with performance unit grants in the Murphy Oil US Retail Marketing Segment that were terminated and paid out on a pro-rated basis at the time of the Separation.
(7) The amounts shown in this column reflect the annual change in accumulated benefits under the Murphy USA retirement plans. See 2013 Non-Qualified Deferred Compensation Table included elsewhere in this prospectus for more information about the Company’s defined contribution plans and the assumptions used in the calculation of these amounts. There are no deferred compensation earnings reported in this column, as the Company’s non-qualified deferred compensation plans do not provide above-market or preferential earnings.

 

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(8) We offer limited perquisites to our NEOs which, together with Company contributions to our qualified savings and nonqualified defined contribution plans, comprise the All Other Compensation column as summarized below:

 

Name

   SERP ER
Contribution
($)
     401(k) ER
Contribution
($)
     Total Contribution
to DC Plans (a)
($)
     Term Life (b)
($)
     Other (c)
($)
 

R. Andrew Clyde

     9,924         15,300         25,224         350         48,973   

Mindy K. West

     7,572         15,300         22,872         840         12,640   

John C. Rudolfs

     —           —           —           840         3,068   

John A. Moore

     3,802         15,300         19,102         840         7,350   

Jeffery A. Goodwin

     1,353         15,297         16,650         840         456   

 

(a) Company contributions to defined contribution plans.

(b) Benefit attributable to Company-provided term life insurance policy.

  (c)   For Mr. Clyde, the amounts shown include moving expenses ($21,389) and the value of personal use of corporate aircraft ($27,584). For Ms. West and Mr. Moore, the amounts shown represent a contribution made on their behalf to charitable organizations under our matching gifts program. For Mr. Rudolfs, the amounts shown include country club dues paid by Murphy Oil. Murphy USA has discontinued the practice of providing membership dues as a perquisite for NEOs. For Mr. Goodwin, the amounts shown include personal use of a company car as well as a contribution made on his behalf to a charitable organization under our matching gifts program.
(9) Amounts include salary for only the portion of the year for which he was employed by Murphy Oil and us and includes a one-time signing bonus of $107,917. Prior to August 1, 2013, Mr. Clyde was an employee of Booz & Company.
(10) In 2012, the NEOs (other than Mr. Clyde) were employed by, and were compensated by Murphy Oil or its subsidiaries.

 

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Grants of Plan-Based Awards in 2013

The following table provides information regarding both equity and non-equity incentive plan awards granted to each NEO during 2013. The awards listed in the table include both the awards granted by Murphy Oil (and subsequently forfeited/terminated at the time of the Separation) as well as the replacement RSUs and pension and lost potential compensation restoration RSUs issued by Murphy USA under the 2013 LTIP. All awards are described in more detail in the Compensation Discussion and Analysis section included elsewhere in this prospectus.

 

          Estimated Future
Payout Under
Non-Equity
Incentive Plan Awards (1)
    Estimated Future
Payout Under Equity
Incentive Plan Awards (2)
    All
Other
Stock
Awards:
Number
of
Shares
of Stock
or
Units (3)
(#)
    All Other
Option
Awards:
Number of
Securities
Underlying
Options (4)
(#)
    Exercise
or Base
Price of
Option
or Stock
Awards (5)
($/Sh)
    Closing
Price
on
Grant
Date
($/Sh)
    Grant
Date
Fair
Value of
Stock
and
Option
Awards (6)
($)
 

Name

  Grant
Date
    Threshold
($)
    Target
($)
    Maximum
($)
    Threshold
($)
    Target
($)
    Maximum
($)
           

R. Andrew Clyde

      375,000        750,000        1,500,000                   
    08/06/13  (7)                    67,446        70.73        70.48        1,390,737   
    08/06/13  (7)            586,592        1,173,184        1,759,777              70.48        1,173,184   
    09/06/13                      118,499  (8)      40.25        39.60        1,391,178   
    10/09/13                    25,099  (8)          39.96        1,002,956   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Mindy K. West

      114,050        228,100        456,200                   
    02/05/13  (7)                    37,000        60.02        60.08        584,970   
    02/05/13  (7)            252,096        504,192        756,288              60.08        504,192   
    09/06/13                      24,158  (9)      37.07        39.60        279,750   
    09/06/13                      61,493  (10)      32.53        39.60        621,079   
    09/06/13                      65,007  (8)      34.16        39.60        585,063   
    09/06/13                    17,981  (11)          39.60        712,048   
    10/09/13                    1,809  (9)          39.96        72,288   
    10/09/13                    9,554  (10)          39.96        381,778   
    10/09/13                    14,171  (8)          39.96        566,273   
    10/22/13                    33,414  (12)          41.48        1,386,013   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

John C. Rudolfs

      86,793        173,587        347,173                   
    02/05/13  (13)            112,500        225,000        450,000                225,000   
    10/09/13                    886  (9)          39.96        35,405   
    10/09/13                    938  (10)          39.96        37,482   
    10/09/13                    5,396  (8)          39.96        215,624   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

John A. Moore

      75,794        151,588        303,177                   
    02/05/13  (7)                    15,500        60.02        60.08        245,055   
    02/05/13  (7)            99,840        199,680        299,520              60.08        199,680   
    09/06/13                      4,392  (9)      37.07        39.60        50,859   
    09/06/13                      17,569  (10)      32.53        39.60        177,447   
    09/06/13                      27,233  (8)      34.16        39.60        245,097   
    09/06/13                    10,101  (11)          39.60        400,000   
    10/09/13                    517  (9)          39.96        20,659   
    10/09/13                    5,732  (10)          39.96        229,051   
    10/09/13                    5,612  (8)          39.96        224,256   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Jeffery A. Goodwin

      66,167        132,333        264,667                   
    02/05/13  (13)            112,500        225,000        450,000                225,000   
    09/06/13                    6,396  (11)          39.60        253,282   
    10/09/13                    739  (9)          39.96        29,530   
    10/09/13                    782  (10)          39.96        31,249   
    10/09/13                    3,597            39.96        143,736   

 

(1) Threshold and maximum awards are based on the provisions in our 2013 AIP. Actual awards earned can range from 0 to 200 percent of the target awards. The Executive Compensation Committee retains the authority to make awards under the program and to use its judgment in adjusting awards downward. Actual payouts for 2013 are calculated using base salary earned in 2013 and reflected in the “Non-Equity Incentive Plan Compensation” column of the “Summary Compensation Table” included in this prospectus.
(2) Threshold and maximum awards are based on the provisions of the relevant Murphy Oil performance-based RSU and performance unit award agreements. Employees of the US Retail Marketing Segment received performance units while all other eligible employees received performance-based RSUs. Actual Murphy Oil performance-based RSU awards earned can range from 0 to 150 percent of the target awards. The target value of each Murphy Oil US Retail Marketing Segment performance unit was $100 while actual payouts earned can range from 0 to 200 percent of the target awards. As a result of the Separation, the performance-based RSUs and performance units were paid out on a pro-rated basis by Murphy Oil and the unearned portion of the awards were forfeited.
(3) Amounts include replacement RSUs as well as pension restoration RSUs for Ms. West and Messrs. Moore and Goodwin and lost potential compensation RSUs for Ms. West. As described in the Compensation Discussion and Analysis, replacement RSUs were awarded by Murphy USA to replace Murphy Oil performance-based RSUs and Murphy Oil US Retail Marketing Segment performance unit awards that were terminated at the time of the Separation. Employees of Murphy USA received pro-rated payouts for earned portions of the Murphy Oil performance-based RSUs and Murphy Oil US Retail Marketing Segment performance units as of the date of the Separation while unearned portions of the performance-based RSUs and performance units were terminated. The pro-rated performance-based RSU payouts were based on Murphy Oil’s TSR results through the date of the Separation. The pro-rated payouts for the performance units were based on results of the US Retail Marketing Segment through the date of the Separation. On October 9, 2013, our Executive Compensation Committee granted replacement RSUs to our NEOs under our 2013 LTIP. The pension restoration and lost potential compensation RSUs are described elsewhere in “Compensation Discussion and Analysis”.
(4) The Murphy Oil Executive Compensation Committee granted options to our NEOs on February 5, 2013 (and, in the case of Mr. Clyde, August 6, 2013). As a result of the Separation, unvested Murphy Oil options were forfeited. On September 6, 2013, our Executive Compensation Committee granted replacement options to our NEOs under our 2013 LTIP.

 

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(5) For Murphy Oil options, the exercise price was determined based on the average high and low stock price on the date of grant. The exercise price of replacement options was determined based on the ratio of the pre-Separation exercise price to stock price of each original option.
(6) The amounts shown in this column reflect the total grant date fair value of awards granted in 2013 in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States regarding stock compensation. For equity incentive plan awards, these amounts represent the grant date fair value at target as determined pursuant to FASB ASC Topic 718. For other stock awards, these amounts represent the grant date fair value of the RSU awards determined pursuant to FASB ASC Topic 718. For option awards, these amounts represent the grant date fair value of the option awards using a Black-Scholes-Merton based methodology. Actual value realized upon option exercise depends on market prices at the time of exercise. Assumptions used in the calculation of these amounts are more fully described in Note 11 to our consolidated and combined financial statements included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2013. The values shown here differ somewhat from the aggregate values presented in the “Stock Awards” and “Option Awards” columns of the “Summary Compensation Table” included elsewhere in this prospectus. The grant date fair value of replacement options and RSUs offset the grant date fair value of awards previously recognized by Murphy Oil and transferred to Murphy USA upon the Separation. No incremental accounting expense was incurred in connection with the replacement awards and thus amounts shown in the “Stock Awards” and “Option Awards” columns of the “Summary Compensation Table” reflect only the grant date fair value of awards granted by Murphy Oil in 2013 and the pension restoration and lost potential compensation RSUs granted by Murphy USA (i.e., excludes the grant date fair value of replacement awards which, for presentation purposes, are included here).
(7) Awards granted by Murphy Oil and denominated in shares of Murphy Oil. At the time of the Separation, unvested options were forfeited and unearned performance-based RSUs were terminated and paid out on a pro-rated basis based on actual performance through the date of the Separation.
(8) Murphy USA replacement award for awards originally granted by Murphy Oil on 2/5/13 (8/6/13 in the case of Mr. Clyde).
(9) Murphy USA replacement awards for awards originally granted by Murphy Oil on 2/1/11.
(10) Murphy USA replacement awards for awards originally granted by Murphy Oil on 1/31/12.
(11) Murphy USA pension restoration RSUs.
(12) Murphy USA lost potential compensation RSUs.
(13) Murphy Oil performance units (target value = $100 per unit). At the time of the Separation, unearned performance units were terminated and paid out on a pro-rated basis based on actual performance through the date of the Separation.

 

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Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year End 2013

The following table illustrates outstanding Murphy USA equity awards (options and RSUs) for each NEO as of December 31, 2013. The table excludes awards issued by Murphy Oil which were forfeited/terminated effective as of the date of the Separation. The table also excludes Murphy Oil options held by our NEOs which, at the time of the Separation, were already vested. In accordance with the EMA, vested options in Murphy Oil were adjusted to preserve the intrinsic value on the date of the Separation. These options will remain exercisable until the earlier of two years from the date of the Separation or the original stated expiration date.

 

    Option Awards     Stock Awards

Name

  Number of
Securities
Underlying
Exercisable
Options (1)
(#)
  Number of
Securities
Underlying
Unexercisable
Options (1)

(#)
    Option
Exercise
Price
($)
    Option
Expiration
Date
    Number of
Shares or
Stock
Units That
Have Not
Vested

(#)
    Market
Value of
Shares
That
Have Not
Vested (2)

($)
    Equity
Incentive Plan
Awards:
Number of
Unearned
shares, Units
or Other
Rights That
Have Not
Vested

(#)
  Equity
Incentive Plan
Awards:
Market or
Payout Value
of Unearned
Shares, Units
or Other
Rights That
Have Not
Vested

($)

R. Andrew Clyde

      118,499        40.25        02/05/20           
            25,099        1,043,114       
 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Mindy K. West

      24,158        37.07        02/01/18           
      61,493        32.53        01/31/19           
      65,007        34.16        02/05/20           
            17,981  (3)      747,290       
            1,809  (4)      75,182       
            9,554  (4)      397,064       
            14,171  (4)      588,947       
            33,414  (5)      1,388,686       
 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

John C. Rudolfs

            886  (4)      36,822       
            938  (4)      38,983       
            5,396  (4)      224,258       
 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

John A. Moore

      4,392        37.07        02/01/18           
      17,569        32.53        01/31/19           
      27,233        34.16        02/05/20           
            10,101  (6)      419,798       
            517  (4)      21,487       
            5,732  (4)      238,222       
            5,612  (4)      233,235       
 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Jeffery A. Goodwin

            6,396  (6)      265,818       
            739  (4)      30,713       
            782 (4)      32,500       
            3,597  (4)      149,491       

 

(1) Replacement stock options in Murphy USA were issued with identical vesting to the original Murphy Oil options. They vest 50% on the two-year anniversary of the original grant date with the remaining 50% vesting on the three-year anniversary of the original grant date. All options expire seven years after the original grant date.
(2) Value was determined based on a December 31, 2013 closing stock price of $41.56 per share.
(3) Roughly 30% of the pension restoration RSUs will vest on the five-year anniversary of the grant date with the remaining RSUs vesting on the 10-year anniversary of the grant date.
(4) Replacement RSUs in Murphy USA vest on the three-year anniversary of the date they were originally granted by Murphy Oil.
(5) Lost potential compensation RSUs will cliff vest on the five-year anniversary of the grant date.
(6) One-half of the pension restoration RSUs will vest on the five-year anniversary of the grant date with the remaining one-half vesting on the 10-year anniversary of the grant date.

 

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Table of Contents

Option Exercises and Stock Vested in 2013

The following table summarizes the value received by each NEO from stock option exercises and stock grants which vested during 2013. Note that no Murphy USA awards vested or were exercised during 2013.

 

     Option Awards      Stock Awards  

Name

   Number of Shares
Acquired on
Exercise
(#)
     Value Realized on
Exercise (1)
($)
     Number of Shares
Acquired on
Vesting
(#)
     Value Realized on
Vesting (2)
($)
 

R. Andrew Clyde

     —           —           —           —     

Mindy K. West

     27,500         584,800         8,403         508,003   

John C. Rudolfs

     —           —           —           —     

John A. Moore

     5,000         68,375         4,808         290,668   

Jeffery A. Goodwin

     16,875         252,499         —           —     

 

(1) The value shown reflects the difference between the market price on the date of exercise and the exercise price of Murphy Oil options.
(2) Represents the aggregate amount received by each respective NEO upon the vesting of Murphy Oil performance-based RSUs during 2013 for pro-rated payments based on results through the date of the Separation for the 2011 through 2013, 2012 through 2014, and 2013 through 2015 performance periods (payment of net shares settled by Murphy Oil on October 1, 2013 at $60.455).

2013 Pension Benefits Table

The following table presents the value of the accrued benefits of the NEOs under the defined benefit portion of the Murphy Oil Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan (“Murphy Oil SERP”), liability for which was assumed by Murphy USA in connection with the Separation. Murphy Oil remains responsible for all accrued benefits to our NEOs under the Murphy Oil Retirement Plan.

 

Name

 

Plan Name (1)

  Number of Years of
Credited Service
(#) (2)
    Present Value of
Accumulated Benefits
($)
    Payments
During Last
Fiscal Year
($)
 

R. Andrew Clyde

  —       —          —          —     

Mindy K. West

  Murphy USA Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan     17.247        358,323        —     

John C. Rudolfs

  Murphy USA Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan     2.997        25,790        —     

John A. Moore

  Murphy USA Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan     18.497        202,421        —     

Jeffery A. Goodwin

  Murphy USA Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan     12.581        127,122        —     

 

(1) Liabilities for benefits accrued for NEOs and other executive employees under the Murphy Oil SERP were transferred to the Murphy USA SERP effective on the date of the Separation.
(2) The number of years of credited service reflects the frozen number of years of service credited under the Murphy Oil SERP through the date of the Separation.

The accrued benefits presented above are based on a final average earning calculation. Frozen final average earnings which could not be included under a tax-qualified retirement plan were as follows: Ms. West $286,016, Mr. Rudolfs $135,204, Mr. Moore $140,183, and Mr. Goodwin $84,402. The following assumptions were used in determining the present value amounts at December 31, 2013:

 

    Discount Rate—4.91%

 

    Mortality Table—RP-2000 projected 20 years

 

    Assumed retirement date at age 65

 

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Table of Contents

2013 Non-Qualified Deferred Compensation Table

The following table presents the value of the accrued benefits of the NEOs under the defined contribution portion of the Murphy Oil SERP, liability for which was assumed by Murphy USA in connection with the Separation as well as the benefits accrued by the NEOs under the Murphy USA SERP from the date of the Separation through December 31, 2013.

 

Name

   Executive
Contributions
in Last
Fiscal Year (1)
($)
     Registrant
Contributions
in Last
Fiscal Year (1)
($)
     Aggregate
Earnings
in Last Fiscal
Year
($)
     Aggregate
Withdrawals /
Distributions
($)
     Aggregate
Balance at
Last FYE (2)
($)
 

R. Andrew Clyde

     7,724         9,924         672         —           18,320   

Mindy K. West

     13,000         7,572         3,684         —           89,520   

John C. Rudolfs

     —           —           —           —           —     

John A. Moore

     1,594         3,802         315         —           8,466   

Jeffery A. Goodwin

     4,702         1,353         1,121         —           9,931   

 

(1) Includes contributions made by NEO while under the employ of both (i) Murphy Oil through the date of the Separation and (ii) Murphy USA through December 31, 2013.
(2) Liabilities for benefits accrued for NEOs and other executive employees under the Murphy Oil SERP were transferred to the Murphy USA SERP effective on the date of the Separation.

The purpose of the Thrift Plan for employees of Murphy USA, a tax-qualified defined contribution retirement plan, is to provide retirement and incidental benefits for all employees who participate. All employees are allowed to contribute on a pre-tax basis up to 25 percent of their eligible pay. The Company matching contributions are limited to dollar for dollar on the first six percent. Participating employees are immediately vested in all employee and Company matching contributions.

Murphy USA also provides a SERP, an unfunded, nonqualified defined contribution plan to eligible executives including the NEOs. The SERP is intended to restore to certain highly-compensated individuals qualified defined contribution (Thrift and profit-sharing) plan benefits restricted under the IRC. The table above represents amounts deferred under both the Murphy Oil SERP (assumed by us) and the Murphy USA SERP for 2013.

Potential Payments upon Termination or Termination in Connection with a Change in Control

The Company does not have employment, CIC, or termination agreements with its NEOs other than with the CEO, which was inherited by Murphy USA in connection with the Separation from prior parent Murphy Oil. However, upon a CIC, as defined in the 2013 LTIP, all outstanding equity awards granted under such plan shall vest, become immediately exercisable or payable, or have all restrictions lifted which apply to the type of award.

The SPA provides certain severance benefits if Mr. Clyde’s employment is terminated within 24 months following a CIC. If his employment is terminated by Murphy USA “without cause” or by Mr. Clyde for “good reason” within this 24-month window, Mr. Clyde will be entitled to his earned but unpaid compensation, a lump sum severance payment equal to three times the sum of his base salary and the average of his last three annual bonuses prior to the termination date (or, if higher, prior to the CIC), accelerated vesting of his outstanding equity-based awards (provided that any performance-based awards be paid assuming the target level of performance) and continued life, accident, and health insurance benefits for 36 months. Mr. Clyde will not be entitled to any “golden parachute” excise tax gross-up payments. The SPA provides for an excise tax cutback to reduce payments to a level such that the excise tax under Sections 280G and 4999 of the IRC will not apply (unless the executive would receive a greater amount of severance benefits on an after-tax basis without a cutback, in which case the cutback will not apply). Pursuant to the SPA, Mr. Clyde will be subject to a non-disclosure covenant and non-solicitation and non-competition restrictive covenants for 12 months following any such termination.

 

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The Company has no other agreement, contract, plan, or arrangement, whether written or unwritten, that provides for potential payments to any other NEOs upon termination or a CIC.

The following table presents estimated amounts that would have been payable to the applicable NEO if the described event had occurred on December 31, 2013, the last trading day of the fiscal year:

 

Name

  

Category

   Normal Termination
($)
     Qualified
Termination
with a
Change of Control
($)
 

R. Andrew Clyde

   Severance (1)      —           4,502,520   
   Non-equity compensation (2)      978,250         978,250   
   Unvested & Accelerated (3)      
  

Restricted Stock Units

     71,940         1,043,114   
  

Stock Options

     —           154,700   
     

 

 

    

 

 

 

Mindy K. West

   Non-equity compensation (2)      305,755         305,755   
   Unvested & Accelerated (3)      
  

Restricted Stock Units

     169,565         3,197,169   
  

Stock Options

     —           1,144,771   
     

 

 

    

 

 

 

John C. Rudolfs

   Non-equity compensation (2)      223,506         223,506   
   Unvested & Accelerated (3)      
  

Restricted Stock Units

     35,284         300,063   
  

Stock Options

     —           —     
     

 

 

    

 

 

 

John A. Moore

   Non-equity compensation (2)      203,555         203,555   
   Unvested & Accelerated (3)      
  

Restricted Stock Units

     63,213         912,741   
  

Stock Options

     —           379,901   
     

 

 

    

 

 

 

Jeffery A. Goodwin

   Non-equity compensation (2)      170,598         170,598   
   Unvested & Accelerated (3)      
  

Restricted Stock Units

     33,456         478,522   
  

Stock Options

     —           —     
     

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1) Represents three times the sum of base salary, target bonus, and the cost of Company-provided term life insurance policy. Mr. Clyde does not participate in our health insurance program. Per the terms of the SPA, since Mr. Clyde has not been employed by us for a full fiscal year, the relevant bonus amount used in determining severance payments is target bonus rather than the three-year average bonus actually awarded.
(2) Non-equity compensation is calculated under the terms of our 2013 AIP. Although actual awards, if any, are subject to attaining certain performance-based targets, for purposes of this table, non-equity compensation is calculated based on actual awards earned in 2013 without adjustment.
(3) In the event of a change of control, all unvested outstanding equity awards shall vest, become immediately exercisable or payable or have all restrictions lifted as may apply to the type of the award. This amount includes the incremental value of the current unvested outstanding awards. In the event of a termination, the exercise period for stock options is reduced to the lesser of the exercise date of the award or two years from date of termination.

Compensation of Directors

Directors who are employees of Murphy USA do not receive compensation for their services on the Board. Our Board of Directors determines annual retainers and other compensation for non-employee Directors. The primary elements of our non-employee director compensation program include a combination of cash and equity. In 2013, the cash component consisted of:

 

    Annual retainer: $40,000

 

    Chairman of the Board: $115,000

 

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    Audit Committee Chairman: $15,000

 

    Executive Compensation Committee Chairman: $12,500

 

    Chair of each other Committee: $10,000

 

    Board and Committee meeting fees: $2,000 each

All retainers are paid quarterly. In 2013, the annual and supplemental retainers awarded to non-employee directors were prorated to reflect only the portion of the year after which directors had been elected by the Murphy Oil Corporation Board (i.e., August 7, 2013 through December 31, 2013). The Company also reimburses directors for travel, lodging, and other related expenses they incur in attending Board and committee meetings.

In addition to the cash component, the non-employee directors also receive an annual grant of time-based restricted stock units which vest after three years. Following the Separation, each non-employee director received a restricted stock unit grant valued at $125,017 on September 6, 2013. In 2014, the Executive Compensation Committee reviewed non-employee director compensation practices for the same peer group used in determining market levels of compensation for the Company’s executives. In order to align non-employee director compensation with that of the peer group, each non-employee director received a reduced annual grant of restricted stock units on February 12, 2014 valued at approximately $100,000.

Further information regarding non-employee director compensation is set forth in the following table.

2013 Director Compensation Table

 

Name

  Fees Earned or
Paid in Cash (1)
($)
    Stock
Awards (2)
($)
    Option
Awards
($)
    Non-Equity
Incentive
Plan
Compensation
($)
    Change in
Pension
Value and
Nonqualified
Deferred
Compensation
Earnings
($)
    All other
Compensation (3)
($)
    Total
($)
 

R. Madison Murphy

    97,500        125,017        —          —          —          25,000        247,517   

Claiborne P. Deming

    44,250        125,017        —          —          —          —          169,267   

Thomas M. Gattle, Jr.

    32,000        125,017        —          —          —          —          157,017   

Robert A. Hermes

    37,000        125,017        —          —          —          500        162,517   

Fred L. Holliger

    34,000        125,017        —          —          —          —          159,017   

Christoph Keller, III

    34,000        125,017        —          —          —          —          159,017   

James W. Keyes

    38,000        125,017        —          —          —          —          163,017   

Diane N. Landen

    32,000        125,017        —          —          —          —          157,017   

Jack T. Taylor

    39,500        125,017        —          —          —          —          164,517   

 

(1) The amounts shown reflect the cash retainers and meeting fees for August 8, 2013 through December 31, 2013.
(2) The amounts shown reflect the aggregate grant date fair value, as computed in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States regarding stock compensation for restricted stock unit awards granted to the non-employee directors in 2013. The aggregate number of restricted stock unit awards held as of December 31, 2013 was 3,157 for each director.
(3) The amount shown represents a contribution made on behalf of Mr. Murphy and Dr. Hermes to charitable organizations under our matching gifts program.

The column above showing “All Other Compensation” represents the incremental cost of matching gifts. The non-employee Directors are eligible to participate in the matching gift program on the same terms as Murphy USA employees. Under this program, an eligible person’s total gifts of up to $12,500 per calendar year will qualify. The Company will contribute to qualified educational institutions and hospitals in an amount equal to twice the amount contributed by the eligible person. The Company will contribute to qualified welfare and cultural organizations an amount equal to the contribution made by the eligible person.

 

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The Board of Directors has also established stock ownership guidelines for non-employee directors of the Company. Directors are expected to achieve ownership of at least three times the annual cash retainer within five years of service. A director may not pledge Company securities either by purchasing Company securities on margin or holding Company securities in a margin account, until he or she has achieved the applicable stock ownership target specified in the guidelines above. These guidelines are designed to ensure that directors display confidence in the Company through the ownership of a significant amount of our stock.

 

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DESCRIPTION OF THE EXCHANGE NOTES

Murphy Oil USA, Inc. issued the notes in an aggregate principal amount of $500,000,000 under an Indenture dated August 14, 2013 (the “Indenture”) among itself, the Guarantors (as defined below) and U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee. The terms of the notes include those stated in the Indenture and those made part of the Indenture by reference to the Trust Indenture Act of 1939, as amended.

Certain terms used in this description are defined under the subheading “—Certain Definitions.” In this description, the terms “Issuer,” “we,” “our” and “us” refer only to Murphy Oil USA, Inc. (or any Person substituted therefor as permitted under the Indenture) and not to any of its subsidiaries; and the term “Holdings” refers only to Murphy USA Inc. (or any Person substituted therefor as permitted under the Indenture) and not to any of its subsidiaries.

On the Issue Date, each of Holdings and the Issuer was a wholly owned Subsidiary of Murphy Oil Corporation (“Murphy Oil”), and Holdings had no Subsidiaries, or material assets or operations. Following the Issue Date, Murphy Oil completed the separation of Holdings (the “Separation”) through certain of the Transactions (as defined herein). For the purposes of this Description of the Exchange Notes and the Indenture, and the interpretation thereof, for periods prior to the consummation of the Stock Contribution (as defined below), the Issuer is deemed a wholly owned Subsidiary of Holdings and the Issuer’s Subsidiaries are deemed wholly owned Subsidiaries of Holdings.

The following description is only a summary of the material provisions of the Indenture. We urge you to read the Indenture because the Indenture, not this description, defines your rights as Holders of these notes. You may request copies of these agreements by contacting us at Murphy USA Inc., 200 Peach Street, El Dorado, Arkansas 71730, Attention: Secretary.

In exchange for the notes issued on the Issue Date, we are issuing the new notes under the Indenture for public resale pursuant to this prospectus. All references to notes below refer to the old notes and/or the new notes unless the context otherwise requires.

Brief Description of the Notes

The notes:

 

    are unsecured senior obligations of the Issuer;

 

    rank senior in right of payment to any future Subordinated Obligations of the Issuer; and

 

    are be structurally subordinated to the obligations of Subsidiaries of the Issuer that are not Guarantors.

The notes were initially guaranteed on a senior unsecured basis by Holdings and all of the Issuer’s domestic Wholly Owned Subsidiaries existing on the Separation Date. For the avoidance of doubt, the Unrelated Subsidiaries, the Ethanol Subsidiaries and Murphy Crude Supply, LLC (an immaterial Subsidiary formed for the purposes of completing the Calumet Transaction) are Unrestricted Subsidiaries and do not guarantee the notes.

Principal, Maturity and Interest

The Issuer issued the old notes initially with a maximum aggregate principal amount of $500 million, and will issue the new notes in such amounts as are tendered for exchange pursuant to this prospectus. The Issuer issued the old notes and will issue the new notes in minimum denominations of $2,000 and any greater integral multiple of $1,000. The notes will mature on August 15, 2023. Subject to our compliance with the covenant described under the subheading “—Certain covenants—Limitation on indebtedness,” we are permitted to issue more notes from time to time (the “Additional Notes”). The notes and the Additional Notes, if any, will be treated as a single

 

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class for all purposes of the Indenture, including waivers, amendments, redemptions and offers to purchase, provided, however, that if the Additional Notes are not fungible with the notes for U.S. federal income tax purposes, the Additional Notes will have a separate CUSIP number. Unless the context otherwise requires, for all purposes of the Indenture and this “Description of the exchange notes,” references to the notes include any Additional Notes actually issued.

Interest on these notes accrue at the rate of 6.000% per annum and will be payable semiannually in arrears on February 15 and August 15. If an interest payment date is not a Business Day, then the payment may be made on the next Business Day with the same force and effect as if made on such date, and the interest which accrues for the period from such interest payment date to such next Business Day will be payable on the next succeeding interest payment date. We will make each interest payment to the Holders of record of these notes on the immediately preceding February 15 and August 15.

Interest on these notes accrue from the most recent date to which interest has been paid, or if no interest has been paid, from the Issue Date. Interest is computed on the basis of a 360-day year comprised of twelve (12) 30-day months.

Optional Redemption

Except as set forth below, we will not be entitled to redeem the notes at our option prior to August 15, 2018.

On and after August 15, 2018, we will be entitled at our option to redeem all or a portion of these notes, at the redemption prices (expressed in percentages of principal amount on the redemption date), plus accrued and unpaid interest to the redemption date (subject to the right of Holders of record on the relevant record date to receive interest due on the relevant interest payment date), if redeemed during the 12-month period commencing on August 15 of the years set forth below:

 

Period

   Redemption
Price
 

2018

     103.000

2019

     102.000

2020

     101.000

2021 and thereafter

     100.000

In addition, any time prior to August 15, 2016, we will be entitled at our option on one or more occasions to redeem notes (which includes Additional Notes, if any) in an aggregate principal amount not to exceed 35% of the aggregate principal amount of the notes (which includes Additional Notes, if any) originally issued at a redemption price (expressed as a percentage of principal amount) of 106%, plus accrued and unpaid interest to the redemption date (subject to the right of Holders of record on the relevant record date to receive interest due on the relevant interest payment date), with the net cash proceeds from one or more Qualified Equity Offerings; provided, however, that

(1) at least 65% of such aggregate principal amount of notes (which includes Additional Notes, if any) remains outstanding immediately after the occurrence of each such redemption (other than notes held, directly or indirectly, by the Issuer or its Affiliates); and

(2) each such redemption occurs within ninety (90) days after the date of the related Qualified Equity Offering.

Prior to August 15, 2018, we will be entitled at our option to redeem all or a portion of the notes at a redemption price equal to 100% of the principal amount of the notes, plus the Applicable Premium as of, and accrued and unpaid interest to, the redemption date (subject to the right of Holders on the relevant record date to receive interest due on the relevant interest payment date).

 

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Applicable Premium” means with respect to a note at any redemption date the excess of (if any) (A) the present value at such redemption date of (1) the redemption price of such note on August 15, 2018 (such redemption price being described in the second paragraph in this “—Optional Redemption” section exclusive of any accrued interest) plus (2) all required remaining scheduled interest payments due on such note through August 15, 2018 (but excluding accrued and unpaid interest to the redemption date), computed using a discount rate equal to the Adjusted Treasury Rate, over (B) the principal amount of such note on such redemption date.

Adjusted Treasury Rate” means, with respect to any redemption date, (i) the yield, under the heading which represents the average for the immediately preceding week, appearing in the most recently published statistical release designated “H.15(519)” or any successor publication which is published weekly by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and which establishes yields on actively traded United States Treasury securities adjusted to constant maturity under the caption “Treasury Constant Maturities,” for the maturity corresponding to the Comparable Treasury Issue (if no maturity is within three (3) months before or after August 15, 2018, yields for the two published maturities most closely corresponding to the Comparable Treasury Issue shall be determined and the Adjusted Treasury Rate shall be interpolated or extrapolated from such yields on a straight line basis, rounding to the nearest month) or (ii) if such release (or any successor release) is not published during the week preceding the calculation date or does not contain such yields, the rate per year equal to the semi-annual equivalent yield to maturity of the Comparable Treasury Issue (expressed as a percentage of its principal amount) equal to the Comparable Treasury Price for such redemption date, in each case calculated on the third Business Day immediately preceding the redemption date, plus 0.50%.

Comparable Treasury Issue” means the United States Treasury security selected by the Quotation Agent as having a maturity comparable to the remaining term of the notes from the redemption date to August 15, 2018, that would be utilized, at the time of selection and in accordance with customary financial practice, in pricing new issues of corporate debt securities of a maturity most nearly equal to August 15, 2018.

Comparable Treasury Price” means, with respect to any redemption date, if clause (ii) of the Adjusted Treasury Rate is applicable, the average of three, or such lesser number as is obtained by the Trustee, Reference Treasury Dealer Quotations for such redemption date.

Quotation Agent” means the Reference Treasury Dealer selected by the Trustee after consultation with Holdings.

Reference Treasury Dealer” means J.P. Morgan Securities LLC and its successors and assigns and two other nationally recognized investment banking firms selected by Holdings that are primary U.S. Government securities dealers.

Reference Treasury Dealer Quotations” means with respect to each Reference Treasury Dealer and any redemption date, the average, as determined by the Trustee, of the bid and asked prices for the Comparable Treasury Issue, expressed in each case as a percentage of its principal amount, quoted in writing to the Trustee by such Reference Treasury Dealer at 5:00 p.m., New York City time, on the third Business Day immediately preceding such redemption date.

Selection and Notice of Redemption

If we are redeeming less than all the notes at any time, the Trustee will select notes on a pro rata basis to the extent practicable.

We will redeem notes of $2,000 or less in whole and not in part. We will cause notices of redemption to be mailed by first-class mail at least thirty (30) but not more than sixty (60) days before the redemption date to each Holder of notes to be redeemed at its registered address, except that redemption notices may be mailed more than sixty (60) days prior to the redemption date if the notice is issued in connection with a defeasance of the notes or

 

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a satisfaction and discharge of the Indenture. Any inadvertent defect in the notice of redemption, including an inadvertent failure to give notice, to any Holder selected for redemption will not impair or affect the validity of the redemption of any other note redeemed in accordance with provisions of the Indenture.

If any note is to be redeemed in part only, the notice of redemption that relates to that note will state the portion of the principal amount thereof to be redeemed. We will issue a new note in a principal amount equal to the unredeemed portion of the original note in the name of the Holder upon cancelation of the original note. Notes called for redemption become due on the date fixed for redemption. On and after the redemption date, interest ceases to accrue on notes or portions of them called for redemption.

Mandatory Redemption; Offers to Purchase; Open Market Purchases

We are not required to make any mandatory redemption or sinking fund payments with respect to the notes. The Indenture contains a special mandatory redemption feature that was applicable only if the Separation was not completed by March 31, 2014. Because we completed the Separation on August 30, 2013, this feature is no longer relevant and noteholders will receive no benefit from it. In addition, under certain circumstances, we may be required to offer to purchase notes as described under “—Change of Control” and “—Certain Covenants—Limitation on Sales of Assets and Subsidiary Stock.” We may at any time and from time to time purchase notes in the open market or otherwise, subject to compliance with applicable law.

Guarantees

Holdings and the Subsidiary Guarantors, fully and unconditionally guarantee, on a senior unsecured basis, our obligations under the notes, on a joint and several basis, subject to customary release provisions in respect of the Subsidiary Guarantors as described below. The obligations of each Subsidiary Guarantor under its Guarantee are designed to be limited as necessary to prevent that Subsidiary Guarantee from constituting a fraudulent conveyance under applicable law, and, therefore, such Subsidiary Guarantee is specifically limited to an amount that such Subsidiary Guarantor could guarantee without such Subsidiary Guarantee constituting a fraudulent conveyance. This limitation, however, may not be effective to prevent such Subsidiary Guarantee from constituting a fraudulent conveyance. If a Subsidiary Guarantee were rendered voidable, it could be subordinated by a court to all other indebtedness (including guarantees and other contingent liabilities) of the applicable Subsidiary Guarantor, and, depending on the amount of such indebtedness, a Subsidiary Guarantor’s liability on its Subsidiary Guarantee could be reduced to zero. See “Risk Factors—Risks Relating to the Notes—Fraudulent conveyance laws may void the notes and/or the guarantees or subordinate the notes and/or the guarantees.”

Each Guarantor that makes a payment under its Guarantee will be entitled upon payment in full of all guarantied obligations under the Indenture to a contribution from each other Guarantor in an amount equal to such other Guarantor’s pro rata portion of such payment based on the respective net assets of all the Guarantors at the time of such payment determined in accordance with GAAP.

The Subsidiary Guarantee of a Subsidiary Guarantor will be released:

(1) upon the designation of such Subsidiary Guarantor as an Unrestricted Subsidiary to the extent permitted by the Indenture;

(2) at such time as such Subsidiary Guarantor ceases to guarantee any Indebtedness of the Issuer under the Senior Credit Agreement, except as a result of payment under such guarantee;

(3) the sale or other disposition (including by way of consolidation or merger) of such Subsidiary Guarantor, in compliance with all of the terms of the Indenture, following which such Subsidiary Guarantor is no longer a Subsidiary; or

 

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(4) if we exercise our legal defeasance option or covenant defeasance option as described under “—Defeasance” or if our obligations under the Indenture are discharged in accordance with the terms of the Indenture.

Unrestricted Subsidiaries

On the Issue Date, the Unrelated Subsidiaries, the Ethanol Subsidiaries and Murphy Crude Supply, LLC (an immaterial Subsidiary formed for the purposes of completing the Calumet Transaction) were Unrestricted Subsidiaries. Under certain circumstances, Holdings will be able to designate other current or future direct or indirect Subsidiaries of Holdings as Unrestricted Subsidiaries. An Unrestricted Subsidiary will not be a Subsidiary Guarantor or subject to the restrictive covenants of the Indenture. One of the Ethanol Subsidiaries, Hankinson Renewable Energy LLC, was sold in December 2013 and is no longer an Unrestricted Subsidiary. As of December 31, 2013, the Unrestricted Subsidiaries had $27.6 million in assets, or 1.5% of Holdings’ total assets; and would have generated approximately $269.3 million, or 1.5% of Holdings’ total revenues for the year ended December 31, 2013. The Unrestricted Subsidiaries had $80.9 million of net income for the same period which included income from discontinued operations of $78.7 million. Included in the discontinued operations was a gain on the sale of the Hankinson facility of $52.5 million. For more information, see the disclosures included in Note 21 “Guarantor Subsidiaries” to our audited consolidated and combined financial statements for the three years ended December 31, 2013 included elsewhere in this prospectus.

Ranking

Senior Indebtedness versus Notes

The Indebtedness evidenced by the notes and the Guarantees is unsecured and would rank pari passu in right of payment to the Senior Indebtedness of the Issuer and the Guarantors, as the case may be.

At December 31, 2013, the Issuer and the Guarantors had approximately $570 million aggregate principal amount of total indebtedness outstanding (which includes $500 million principal amount of the notes offered for exchange hereby), of which $70 million was secured indebtedness. In addition, as of December 31, 2013, we had approximately $390 million available for borrowing (subject to periodic borrowing base limitations) as additional senior secured Indebtedness under the Senior Credit Agreement (without giving effect to the $200 million uncommitted incremental facility). See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Liquidity and Capital Resources.” Virtually all of the Senior Indebtedness of such Guarantors consists of their respective guaranties of Senior Indebtedness of the Issuer under the Senior Credit Agreement and with respect to the notes.

The notes are unsecured obligations of the Issuer. Secured debt and other secured obligations of the Issuer (including obligations with respect to the Senior Credit Agreement) would be effectively senior to the notes to the extent of the value of the assets securing such debt or other obligations.

Liabilities of Subsidiaries versus Notes

A portion of our operations are conducted through our Subsidiaries. The Unrelated Subsidiaries and the Unrestricted Subsidiaries are not guaranteeing the notes, and, as described above under “—Guarantees,” Guarantees may be released under certain circumstances. In addition, our future Subsidiaries may not be required to guarantee the notes. Claims of third-party creditors of such non-Guarantor Subsidiaries, including trade creditors and creditors holding indebtedness or Guarantees issued by such non-Guarantor Subsidiaries, and claims of preferred stockholders of such non-Guarantor Subsidiaries generally will have priority with respect to the assets and earnings of such non-Guarantor Subsidiaries over the claims of our creditors, including Holders of the notes. Accordingly, the notes would be structurally subordinated to third-party creditors (including trade creditors) and preferred stockholders, if any, of such non-Guarantor Subsidiaries.

 

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At December 31, 2013, the total third-party liabilities of the non-Guarantor Subsidiaries were approximately $4.1 million, including trade payables. Although the Indenture limits the incurrence of Indebtedness and preferred stock by certain of our Subsidiaries, such limitation is subject to a number of significant qualifications. Moreover, the Indenture does not impose any limitation on the incurrence by such Subsidiaries of liabilities that are not considered Indebtedness under the Indenture. See “—Certain Covenants—Limitation on Indebtedness.”

Book-entry, Delivery and Form

The Global Notes

The new notes will be issued in the form of several registered notes in global form, without interest coupons (the “Global Notes”), as follows:

 

    new notes issued to noteholders who purchased old notes as qualified institutional buyers under Rule 144A will be represented by the “Rule 144A Global Note;” and

 

    new notes issued to noteholders who purchased old notes in offshore transactions to non-U.S. persons in reliance on Regulation S will be represented by the “Regulation S Global Note.”

Upon issuance, each of the Global Notes will be deposited with the Trustee as custodian for The Depository Trust Company (“DTC”) and registered in the name of Cede & Co., as nominee of DTC.

Ownership of beneficial interests in each Global Note will be limited to persons who have accounts with DTC (“Participants”) or persons who hold interests through Participants (“Indirect Participants”). We expect that under procedures established by DTC:

 

    upon deposit of each Global Note with DTC’s custodian, DTC will credit portions of the principal amount of the Global Note to the accounts of the Participants that have validly exchanged their old notes for new notes in the Exchange Offer; and

 

    ownership of beneficial interests in each Global Note will be shown on, and transfer of ownership of those interests will be effected only through, records maintained by DTC (with respect to interests of Participants) and the records of Participants (with respect to other owners of beneficial interests in the Global Note).

Beneficial interests in the Regulation S Global Note will initially be credited within DTC to Euroclear Bank S.A./N.V. (“Euroclear”) and Clearstream Banking, société anonyme (“Clearstream”), on behalf of the owners of such interests.

Investors may hold their interests in the Regulation S Global Note directly through Euroclear or Clearstream, if they are participants in those systems, or indirectly through organizations that are participants in those systems. Investors may also hold their interests in the Regulation S Global Note through organizations other than Euroclear or Clearstream that are Participants. Each of Euroclear and Clearstream will appoint a Participant to act as its depositary for the interests in the Regulation S Global Note that are held within DTC for the account of each settlement system on behalf of its Participants.

Beneficial interests in the Global Notes may not be exchanged for notes in physical, certificated form (“Certificated Notes”) except in the limited circumstances described below.

Each Global Note and beneficial interests in each Global Note will be subject to restrictions on transfer as described under “Transfer Restrictions.”

Exchanges Among the Global Notes

Subject to compliance with the transfer restrictions applicable to the notes described herein, beneficial interests in one Global Note may generally be exchanged for interests in another Global Note. Depending on which Global

 

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Note the transfer is being made, the Trustee may require the seller to provide certain written certifications in the form provided in the Indenture.

A beneficial interest in a Global Note that is transferred to a person who takes delivery through another Global Note will, upon transfer, become subject to any transfer restrictions and other procedures applicable to beneficial interests in the other Global Note.

Book-entry Procedures for the Global Notes

All interests in the Global Notes will be subject to the operations and procedures of DTC, Euroclear and Clearstream. We provide the following summaries of those operations and procedures solely for the convenience of investors. The operations and procedures of each settlement system are controlled by that settlement system and may be changed at any time. We are not responsible for those operations or procedures.

DTC has advised us that it is:

 

    a limited-purpose trust company organized under the laws of the State of New York;

 

    a “banking organization” within the meaning of the New York State Banking Law;

 

    a member of the U.S. Federal Reserve System;

 

    a “clearing corporation” within the meaning of the New York Uniform Commercial Code; and

 

    a “clearing agency” registered under Section 17A of the Exchange Act.

DTC was created to hold securities for its Participants and to facilitate the clearance and settlement of securities transactions between its Participants through electronic book-entry changes to the accounts of its Participants. Participants include securities brokers and dealers; banks and trust companies; clearing corporations and other organizations. Indirect access to DTC’s system is also available to others such as banks, brokers, dealers and trust companies; these Indirect Participants clear through or maintain a custodial relationship with a Participant, either directly or indirectly. Investors who are not Participants may beneficially own securities held by or on behalf of DTC only through Participants or Indirect Participants.

So long as DTC’s nominee is the registered owner of a Global Note, that nominee will be considered the sole owner or Holder of the notes represented by that Global Note for all purposes under the Indenture. Except as provided below, owners of beneficial interests in a Global Note:

 

    will not be entitled to have notes represented by the Global Note registered in their names;

 

    will not receive or be entitled to receive physical, Certificated Notes; and

 

    will not be considered the owners or Holders of the notes under the Indenture for any purpose, including with respect to the giving of any direction, instruction or approval to the Trustee under the Indenture.

As a result, each investor who owns a beneficial interest in a Global Note must rely on the procedures of DTC to exercise any rights of a Holder of notes under the Indenture (and, if the investor is not a Participant or an Indirect Participant, on the procedures of the Participant through which the investor owns its interest).

Payments of principal, premium (if any) and interest with respect to the notes represented by a Global Note will be made by the Trustee to DTC’s nominee as the registered Holder of the Global Note. Neither we nor the Trustee will have any responsibility or liability for the payment of amounts to owners of beneficial interests in a Global Note, for any aspect of the records relating to or payments made on account of those interests by DTC, or for maintaining, supervising or reviewing any records of DTC relating to those interests.

 

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Payments by Participants and Indirect Participants to the owners of beneficial interests in a Global Note will be governed by standing instructions and customary industry practice and will be the responsibility of those Participants or Indirect Participants and DTC.

Transfers between Participants in DTC will be effected under DTC’s procedures and will be settled in same-day funds. Transfers between participants in Euroclear or Clearstream will be effected in the ordinary way under the rules and operating procedures of those systems.

Cross-market transfers between Participants, on the one hand, and Euroclear or Clearstream participants, on the other hand, will be effected within DTC through the Participants that are acting as depositaries for Euroclear and Clearstream. To deliver or receive an interest in a Global Note held in a Euroclear or Clearstream account, an investor must send transfer instructions to Euroclear or Clearstream, as the case may be, under the rules and procedures of that system and within the established deadlines of that system. If the transaction meets its settlement requirements, Euroclear or Clearstream, as the case may be, will send instructions to its DTC depositary to take action to effect final settlement by delivering or receiving interests in the relevant Global Notes in DTC, and making or receiving payment under normal procedures for same-day funds settlement applicable to DTC. Euroclear and Clearstream participant may not deliver instructions directly to the DTC depositaries that are acting for Euroclear or Clearstream.

Because of time zone differences, the securities account of a Euroclear or Clearstream participant that purchases an interest in a Global Note from a Participant will be credited on the business day for Euroclear or Clearstream immediately following the DTC settlement date. Cash received in Euroclear or Clearstream from the sale of an interest in a Global Note to a Participant will be received with value on the DTC settlement date but will be available in the relevant Euroclear or Clearstream cash account as of the Business Day for Euroclear or Clearstream following the DTC settlement date.

Change of Control

Upon the occurrence of any of the following events (each a “Change of Control”), each Holder shall have the right to require that the Issuer repurchase such Holder’s notes at a purchase price in cash equal to 101% of the principal amount thereof on the date of purchase plus accrued and unpaid interest, if any, to the date of purchase (subject to the right of Holders of record on the relevant record date to receive interest due on the relevant interest payment date):

(1) any “person” (as such term is used in Sections 13(d)(3) of the Exchange Act), other than Murphy Oil (prior to the consummation of the Transactions), is or becomes the “beneficial owner” (as defined in Rules 13d-3 and 13d-5 under the Exchange Act), directly or indirectly, of more than 50% of the total voting power of the Voting Stock of Holdings; provided that the consummation of any such transaction resulting in such person owning more than 50% of the total voting power of the Voting Stock of Holdings will not be considered a Change of Control if (a) Holdings becomes a direct or indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of a holding company and (b) immediately following such transaction, (x) the direct or indirect holders of the Voting Stock of the holding company are substantially the same as the holders of Holdings’ Voting Stock immediately prior to such transaction or (y) no person is the beneficial owner, directly or indirectly, of more than 50% of the Voting Stock of such holding company;

(2) the adoption by the Board of Directors of a plan relating to the liquidation or dissolution of Holdings;

(3) the merger or consolidation of Holdings with or into another Person or the merger of another Person with or into Holdings, or the sale of all or substantially all the assets of Holdings (determined on a consolidated basis) to another Person other than a transaction following which (A) in the case of a merger or consolidation transaction, holders of securities that represented 100% of the Voting Stock of Holdings immediately prior to such transaction (or other securities into which such securities are converted as part of such merger or consolidation transaction) own directly or indirectly at least a majority of the voting power of the Voting Stock of the surviving Person or any direct or indirect parent company of the surviving Person

 

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in such merger or consolidation transaction immediately after such transaction and (B) in the case of the sale of all or substantially all the assets of Holdings, each transferee becomes an obligor or a Guarantor in respect of the notes;

(4) prior to the consummation of the Transactions, Murphy Oil ceases to own, directly or indirectly, 100% of each of the Capital Stock and aggregate voting power of the Voting Stock of the Issuer or Holdings; or

(5) after the consummation of the Transactions, the Issuer ceases to be a Subsidiary of Holdings.

Within thirty (30) days following any Change of Control unless we have previously or concurrently mailed a redemption notice with respect to all outstanding notes as described under “—Optional Redemption,” we will mail a notice by first-class mail to each Holder with a copy to the Trustee (the “Change of Control Offer”) stating:

(1) that a Change of Control has occurred and that such Holder has the right to require us to purchase such Holder’s notes at a purchase price in cash equal to 101% of the principal thereof on the date of purchase, plus accrued and unpaid interest, if any, to the date of purchase (subject to the right of Holders of record on the relevant record date to receive interest on the relevant interest payment date);

(2) the circumstances and relevant facts regarding such Change of Control;

(3) the purchase date (which shall be no earlier than thirty (30) days nor later than sixty (60) days from the date such notice is mailed); and

(4) the instructions, as determined by us, consistent with the covenant described hereunder, that a Holder must follow in order to have its notes purchased.

We will not be required to make a Change of Control Offer following a Change of Control if a third party makes the Change of Control Offer in the manner, at the times and otherwise in compliance with the requirements set forth in the Indenture applicable to a Change of Control Offer made by us and purchases all notes validly tendered and not withdrawn under such Change of Control Offer.

A Change of Control Offer may be made in advance of a Change of Control, conditional upon such Change of Control, if a definitive agreement is in place for the Change of Control at the time of making of the Change of Control Offer.

We will comply, to the extent applicable, with the requirements of Rule 14e-1 under the Exchange Act and any other securities laws or regulations in connection with the repurchase of notes as a result of a Change of Control. To the extent that the provisions of any securities laws or regulations conflict with the provisions of the covenant described hereunder, we will comply with the applicable securities laws and regulations and shall not be deemed to have breached our obligations under the covenant described hereunder by virtue of our compliance with such securities laws or regulations.

The Change of Control purchase feature of the notes may in certain circumstances make more difficult or discourage a sale or takeover of Holdings and, thus, the removal of incumbent Board of Directors or management of Holdings. The Change of Control purchase feature is a result of negotiations between Holdings and the Initial Purchasers. Holdings has no present intention to engage in a transaction involving a Change of Control, although it is possible that it could decide to do so in the future.

Subject to the limitations discussed below, Holdings could, in the future, enter into certain transactions, including acquisitions, refinancings or other recapitalizations, that would not constitute a Change of Control under the Indenture, but that could increase the amount of indebtedness outstanding at such time or otherwise affect Holdings’ and the Issuer’s capital structure or credit ratings. Restrictions on Holdings, the Issuer and the Restricted Subsidiaries’ ability to Incur additional Indebtedness are contained in the covenants described under “—Certain Covenants—Limitation on Indebtedness” and “—Limitation on Liens.” Such restrictions can only be

 

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waived with the consent of the Holders of a majority in principal amount of the notes then outstanding. Except for the limitations contained in such covenants, however, the Indenture does not contain any covenants or provisions that may afford Holders of the notes protection in the event of a highly leveraged transaction. In addition, Holders of the notes may not be entitled to require the Issuer to repurchase the notes in certain circumstances involving a significant change in the composition of the Board of Directors, including in connection with a proxy contest, where the Board of Directors does not endorse a dissident slate of directors but approves them for purposes of the Indenture.

If the terms of the Senior Credit Agreement prohibit the Issuer from making a Change of Control Offer or from purchasing the notes pursuant thereto, prior to the mailing of the notice to Noteholders described in the preceding paragraph, but in any event within thirty (30) days following any Change of Control, the Issuer covenants to:

(1) repay in full all Indebtedness outstanding under the Senior Credit Agreement or offer to repay in full all such Indebtedness and repay the Indebtedness of each lender who has accepted such offer; or

(2) obtain the requisite consent under the Senior Credit Agreement to permit the purchase of the notes as described above.

The Issuer must first comply with the covenant described above before it will be required to purchase notes in the event of a Change of Control, provided, however, that the Issuer’s failure to comply with the covenant described in the preceding sentence or to make a Change of Control Offer because of any such failure shall constitute a default described in clause (4) under “—Defaults” below (and not under clause (2) thereof). As a result of the foregoing, a Holder of the notes may not be able to compel the Issuer to purchase the notes unless the Issuer is able at the time to refinance all Indebtedness outstanding under the Senior Credit Agreement or obtain requisite consents under the Senior Credit Agreement.

Future indebtedness that we may incur may contain prohibitions on the occurrence of certain events that would constitute a Change of Control or require the repurchase of such indebtedness upon a Change of Control. Moreover, the occurrence of a Change of Control, or the exercise by the Holders of their right to require us to repurchase their notes due to the financial effect of such repurchase on us, could cause a default under the Senior Credit Agreement or under other Indebtedness. Finally, our ability to pay cash to the Holders of notes in connection with a Change of Control Offer may be limited by our then existing financial resources. There can be no assurance that sufficient funds will be available when necessary to make any required repurchases.

The definition of “Change of Control” includes a disposition of all or substantially all of the assets of Holdings to any Person. Although there is a limited body of case law interpreting the phrase “substantially all,” there is no precise established definition of the phrase under applicable law. Accordingly, in certain circumstances there may be a degree of uncertainty as to whether a particular transaction would involve a disposition of “all or substantially all” of the assets of Holdings. As a result, it may be unclear as to whether a Change of Control has occurred and whether a Holder of notes may require the Issuer to make an offer to repurchase the notes as described above. For the avoidance of doubt, any disposition of the Ethanol Assets or any disposition of shares of Capital Stock of the Ethanol Subsidiaries will not constitute the disposition of all or substantially all of the properties and assets of Holdings.

The provisions under the Indenture relative to our obligation to make a Change of Control Offer may be waived or modified with the written consent of the Holders of a majority in principal amount of the notes.

Certain Covenants

The Indenture contains covenants including, among others, those summarized below. Following the first day (the “Suspension Date”) that: (i) the notes have an Investment Grade Rating from both of the Rating Agencies and (ii) no Default has occurred and is continuing under the Indenture.

 

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Holdings, the Issuer and the Restricted Subsidiaries will not be subject to the provisions of the Indenture summarized below under:

 

  (1) “—Limitation on Indebtedness,”

 

  (2) “—Limitation on Restricted Payments,”

 

  (3) “—Limitation on Restrictions on Distributions from Restricted Subsidiaries,”

 

  (4) “—Limitation on Sales of Assets and Subsidiary Stock,”

 

  (5) “—Limitation on Affiliate Transactions,”

 

  (6) “—Future Subsidiary Guarantors” and

 

  (7) clause (3) of paragraphs (a) and (b) under “—Merger and Consolidation”

(collectively, the “Suspended Covenants”). In addition, the then-existing Subsidiary Guarantees will also be suspended as of the Suspension Date. In the event that Holdings, the Issuer and the Restricted Subsidiaries are not subject to the Suspended Covenants for any period of time as a result of the foregoing, and on any subsequent date (the “Reversion Date”) one or both of the Rating Agencies withdraws its Investment Grade Rating or downgrades the rating assigned to the notes below an Investment Grade Rating, then Holdings, the Issuer and the Restricted Subsidiaries will thereafter again be subject to the Suspended Covenants with respect to future events and the Subsidiary Guarantees will be reinstated. The period of time between the Suspension Date and the Reversion Date is referred to in this description as the “Suspension Period.” Notwithstanding that the Suspended Covenants may be reinstated, no Default will be deemed to have occurred as a result of a failure to comply with the Suspended Covenants during the Suspension Period.

On the Reversion Date, all Indebtedness Incurred during the Suspension Period will be classified to have been Incurred pursuant to paragraph (a) of “—Limitation on Indebtedness” or one of the clauses set forth in paragraph (b) of “—Limitation on Indebtedness” (to the extent such Indebtedness would be permitted to be Incurred thereunder as of the Reversion Date and after giving effect to Indebtedness Incurred prior to the Suspension Period and outstanding on the Reversion Date). To the extent such Indebtedness would not be so permitted to be Incurred pursuant to paragraph (a) or (b) of “—Limitation on Indebtedness,” such Indebtedness will be deemed to have been outstanding on the Issue Date, so that it is classified as permitted under clause (4) of paragraph (b) of “—Limitation of Indebtedness.” Calculations made after the Reversion Date of the amount available to be made as Restricted Payments under “—Limitation on Restricted Payments” will be made as though the covenant described under “—Limitation on Restricted Payments” had been in effect since the Issue Date and throughout the Suspension Period. Accordingly, Restricted Payments made during the Suspension Period will reduce the amount available to be made as Restricted Payments under paragraph (a) of “—Limitation on Restricted Payments” and the items specified in subclauses (3)(A) through (3)(E) of paragraph (a) of “—Limitation on Restricted Payments” will increase the amount available to be made under paragraph (a) thereof. For purposes of determining compliance with paragraph (a) of the “—Limitation of Sales of Assets and Subsidiary Stock,” the amount of Net Available Cash from all Asset Dispositions not applied in accordance with the covenant will be deemed to be reset to zero.

Limitation on Indebtedness

(a) Holdings will not, and will not permit the Issuer or any Restricted Subsidiary to, Incur, directly or indirectly, any Indebtedness; provided, however, that Holdings, the Issuer and the Restricted Subsidiaries will be entitled to Incur Indebtedness if, on the date of such Incurrence and after giving effect thereto on a pro forma basis (including a pro forma application of the net proceeds therefrom), the Consolidated Coverage Ratio exceeds 2.0 to 1.0 (any such Indebtedness Incurred pursuant to this clause (a) being herein referred to as “Coverage Indebtedness”); provided further, that the amount of Indebtedness that may be Incurred pursuant to the foregoing by Restricted Subsidiaries that are not Guarantors shall not exceed $250 million at any one time outstanding.

 

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(b) Notwithstanding the foregoing paragraph (a), Holdings, the Issuer and the Restricted Subsidiaries will be entitled to Incur any or all of the following Indebtedness (any such Indebtedness Incurred pursuant to this clause (b) being herein referred to as “Permitted Indebtedness”):

(1) Indebtedness Incurred by Holdings, the Issuer and any Restricted Subsidiary pursuant to any Credit Facility; provided, however, that, after giving effect to any such Incurrence, the aggregate principal amount of all Indebtedness Incurred under this clause (1) and then outstanding does not exceed the greater of (i) $1,000 million and (ii) the sum of $500 million and 25% of Consolidated Net Tangible Assets of Holdings, the Issuer and the Restricted Subsidiaries determined on the date of such Incurrence (any such Indebtedness Incurred pursuant to this clause (1) being herein referred to as “Credit Facility Indebtedness”); provided further, that the amount of Indebtedness that may be Incurred pursuant to the foregoing by Restricted Subsidiaries that are not Guarantors shall not exceed $150 million at any one time outstanding under this clause (1).

(2) Indebtedness owed to and held by Holdings, the Issuer or a Restricted Subsidiary; provided, however, that (A) any subsequent issuance or transfer of any Capital Stock which results in any such Restricted Subsidiary ceasing to be a Restricted Subsidiary or any subsequent transfer of such Indebtedness (other than to Holdings, the Issuer or a Restricted Subsidiary) shall be deemed, in each case, to constitute the Incurrence of such Indebtedness by the obligor thereon, (B) if the Issuer is the obligor on such Indebtedness, such Indebtedness shall be expressly subordinated to the prior payment in full of all obligations with respect to the notes and (C) if a Guarantor is the obligor on such Indebtedness, such Indebtedness shall be expressly subordinated to the prior payment in full of all obligations of such Guarantor with respect to its Guarantee;

(3) the notes and the Exchange Notes (other than any Additional Notes);

(4) Indebtedness outstanding on the Issue Date or under the Spin-Off Documents (other than Indebtedness described in clause (1), (2) or (3) of this covenant);

(5) Indebtedness of a Restricted Subsidiary Incurred and outstanding on or prior to the date on which such Restricted Subsidiary was acquired by Holdings (other than Indebtedness Incurred in connection with, or to provide all or any portion of the funds or credit support utilized to consummate, the transaction or series of related transactions pursuant to which such Subsidiary became a Subsidiary or was acquired by Holdings); provided, however, that on the date of such acquisition and after giving pro forma effect thereto, Holdings would have been entitled to Incur at least $1.00 of Coverage Indebtedness pursuant to paragraph (a) of this covenant;

(6) Refinancing Indebtedness in respect of any Coverage Indebtedness or any Permitted Indebtedness Incurred pursuant to clauses (3), (4) or (5) or this clause (6);

(7) Hedging Obligations incurred in the ordinary course of business and not for the purpose of speculation;

(8) Obligations in respect of workers’ compensation claims, public liability insurance, unemployment insurance, property, casualty or liability insurance, self-insurance obligations, bankers’ acceptances, or customs, completion, advance payment, performance, bid, performance, appeal and surety bonds, completion guarantees and other similar obligations provided by Holdings, the Issuer or any Restricted Subsidiary in the ordinary course of business, including guarantees or obligations with respect to letters of credit supporting the foregoing;

(9) Indebtedness arising from the honoring by a bank or other financial institution of a check, draft or similar instrument drawn against insufficient funds in the ordinary course of business; provided, however, that such Indebtedness is extinguished within 10 Business Days of its Incurrence;

(10) the Guarantee by Holdings, the Issuer or any Subsidiary Guarantor of Indebtedness of Holdings, the Issuer or any Subsidiary Guarantor that was permitted to be Incurred by another provision of this covenant; provided, however, that if the Indebtedness being guaranteed is subordinated to or pari passu with the notes, then the Guarantee thereof Incurred pursuant to this clause (10) shall be subordinated or pari passu, as applicable, to the same extent as the Indebtedness being Guaranteed;

 

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(11) Purchase Money Indebtedness (i) Incurred to finance the acquisition, construction, development, design, installation or improvement by Holdings, the Issuer or a Restricted Subsidiary of assets or (ii) assumed in connection with the acquisition of any fixed or capital assets, and any Refinancing Indebtedness Incurred to Refinance such Indebtedness, in an aggregate principal amount which, when added together with the amount of Indebtedness Incurred pursuant to this clause (11) and then outstanding, does not exceed the greater of (A) $75 million and (B) 6.5% of Consolidated Net Tangible Assets of Holdings, the Issuer and the Restricted Subsidiaries determined as of the date of such Incurrence;

(12) Indebtedness Incurred by Holdings, the Issuer or any Restricted Subsidiary in an aggregate principal amount which, when taken together with all other Indebtedness of Holdings, the Issuer and the Restricted Subsidiaries outstanding on the date of such Incurrence and incurred pursuant to this clause (12) does not exceed the greater of (A) $50 million and (B) 4% of the Consolidated Net Tangible Assets of Holdings, the Issuer and the Restricted Subsidiaries determined at the date of such Incurrence;

(13) Indebtedness Incurred by Foreign Subsidiaries of Holdings in an aggregate principal amount at any time outstanding pursuant to this clause (13) not to exceed the greater of (A) $75 million and (B) 6.5% of Consolidated Net Tangible Assets of the Foreign Subsidiaries determined as of the date of such Incurrence;

(14) Attributable Debt of Holdings, the Issuer or any Restricted Subsidiary Incurred in connection with any Sale/Leaseback Transaction which, when taken together with all other Attributable Debt of Holdings, the Issuer and the Restricted Subsidiaries outstanding on the date of such Incurrence and incurred pursuant to this clause (14), does not exceed the greater of (A) $25 million and (B) 1.5% of Consolidated Net Tangible Assets of Holdings, the Issuer and the Restricted Subsidiaries determined at the date of such Incurrence;

(15) any obligation arising from agreements of Holdings, the Issuer or any Restricted Subsidiary providing for indemnification, adjustment of purchase price, earn outs, or similar obligations, in each case, incurred or assumed in connection with the sale, disposition or acquisition of any business, assets, Indebtedness or Capital Stock of Holdings, the Issuer or a Restricted Subsidiary in a transaction not prohibited by the Indenture;

(16) Indebtedness of Holdings, the Issuer or any Restricted Subsidiary consisting of (A) the financing of insurance premiums or (B) take-or-pay obligations contained in ordinary course supply arrangements;

(17) Indebtedness of Holdings, the Issuer or any Restricted Subsidiary in respect of any agreement or other arrangement governing the provision of treasury or cash management services, including deposit accounts, overdraft, credit or debit card, funds transfer, automated clearinghouse, zero balance accounts, returned check concentration, controlled disbursement, lockbox, account reconciliation and reporting and trade finance services and other cash management services;

(18) Indebtedness due to any landlord in connection with the financing by such landlord of leasehold improvements; and

(19) Indebtedness consisting of obligations under deferred compensation arrangements, non-competition agreements or similar arrangements.

(c) Notwithstanding the foregoing, neither Holdings, the Issuer nor any Subsidiary Guarantor may Incur any Indebtedness pursuant to the foregoing paragraph (b) if the proceeds thereof are used, directly or indirectly, to Refinance any Subordinated Obligations of Holdings, the Issuer or any Subsidiary Guarantor unless such Indebtedness shall be subordinated to the notes or the applicable Guarantee to at least the same extent as such Subordinated Obligations.

 

(d) For purposes of determining compliance with this covenant:

(1) any Indebtedness outstanding on the Separation Date under the Senior Credit Agreement will be treated as Incurred on the Issue Date under clause (1) of paragraph (b) above;

 

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(2) in the event that an item of Indebtedness (or any portion thereof) meets the criteria of more than one of the types of Indebtedness described above, Holdings, in its sole discretion, will classify such item of Indebtedness (or any portion thereof) at the time of Incurrence and will only be required to include the amount and type of such Indebtedness in one of the above clauses;

(3) Holdings will be entitled to divide and classify an item of Indebtedness in more than one of the types of Indebtedness described above and, in that connection, Holdings will be entitled to treat a portion of such Indebtedness as Coverage Indebtedness and the balance of such Indebtedness as an item or items of Permitted Indebtedness;

(4) any Permitted Indebtedness originally classified as Incurred pursuant to one of the clauses in paragraph (b) above (other than pursuant to clause (1) of paragraph (b) above) may later be reclassified by Holdings in whole or in part such that it will be deemed as having been Incurred as Coverage Indebtedness pursuant to paragraph (a) above or as Permitted Indebtedness pursuant to another clause in paragraph (b) above, as applicable, to the extent that such reclassified Indebtedness could be Incurred pursuant thereto at the time of such reclassification;

(5) the accrual of interest or Preferred Stock dividends, the accretion or amortization of original issue discount, the payment of interest on any Indebtedness in the form of additional Indebtedness with the same terms, the reclassification of Preferred Stock as Indebtedness due to a change in accounting principles, and the payment of dividends on Preferred Stock or Disqualified Stock in the form of additional shares of the same class of Preferred Stock or Disqualified Stock will not be deemed to be an Incurrence of Indebtedness or an issuance of Preferred Stock or Disqualified Stock; and

(6) the reclassification of any lease or other liability of Holdings, the Issuer or any of the Restricted Subsidiaries as Indebtedness due to a change in accounting principles after the Issue Date will not be deemed to be an Incurrence of Indebtedness.

(e) For purposes of determining compliance with any U.S. dollar denominated restriction on the Incurrence of Indebtedness where the Indebtedness Incurred is denominated in a different currency, the amount of such Indebtedness will be the U.S. Dollar Equivalent determined on the date of the Incurrence of such Indebtedness; provided, however, that if any such Indebtedness denominated in a different currency is subject to a Currency Agreement with respect to U.S. dollars covering all principal, premium, if any, and interest payable on such Indebtedness, the amount of such Indebtedness expressed in U.S. dollars will be as provided in such Currency Agreement. The principal amount of any Refinancing Indebtedness Incurred in the same currency as the Indebtedness being Refinanced will be the U.S. Dollar Equivalent of the Indebtedness Refinanced, except to the extent that (1) such U.S. Dollar Equivalent was determined based on a Currency Agreement, in which case the Refinancing Indebtedness will be determined in accordance with the preceding sentence, and (2) the principal amount of the Refinancing Indebtedness exceeds the principal amount of the Indebtedness being Refinanced, in which case the U.S. Dollar Equivalent of such excess will be determined on the date such Refinancing Indebtedness is Incurred. Notwithstanding any other provision of this covenant, the maximum amount of Indebtedness that Holdings, the Issuer or any of the Restricted Subsidiaries may incur pursuant to this covenant shall not be deemed to be exceeded solely as a result of fluctuations in exchange rates or currency values.

Limitation on Restricted Payments

(a) Holdings will not, and will not permit the Issuer or any Restricted Subsidiary, directly or indirectly, to make a Restricted Payment if at the time such Restricted Payment is made:

(1) a Default shall have occurred and be continuing (or would result therefrom);

(2) Holdings is not entitled to Incur an additional $1.00 of Coverage Indebtedness pursuant to the covenant described under “—Limitation on Indebtedness;” or

 

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(3) the aggregate amount of such Restricted Payment and all other Restricted Payments since the Issue Date would exceed the sum of (without duplication):

(A) 50% of the Consolidated Net Income accrued during the period (treated as one accounting period) from the beginning of the fiscal quarter during which the Issue Date occurs to the end of the most recent fiscal quarter ending prior to the date of such Restricted Payment for which consolidated financial statements of Holdings are available (or, in case such Consolidated Net Income shall be a deficit, minus 100% of such deficit); plus

(B) 100% of the aggregate Net Cash Proceeds or Fair Market Value of any asset (other than cash) received by Holdings either (x) from the issuance or sale of its Qualified Capital Stock subsequent to the Issue Date or (y) as a contribution in respect of its Qualified Capital Stock from its shareholders subsequent to the Issue Date, but excluding in each case any Net Cash Proceeds that are used to redeem notes in accordance with the third paragraph under “—Optional Redemption;” plus

(C) the amount by which the principal amount of consolidated Indebtedness of Holdings (other than Indebtedness owing to a Subsidiary) is reduced upon the conversion or exchange subsequent to the Issue Date of any consolidated Indebtedness of Holdings convertible or exchangeable for Qualified Capital Stock of Holdings (less the amount of any cash, or the fair value of any other property, distributed by Holdings upon such conversion or exchange); provided, however, that the foregoing amount shall not exceed the Net Cash Proceeds received by Holdings, the Issuer or any Restricted Subsidiary from the sale of such Indebtedness (excluding Net Cash Proceeds from sales to a Subsidiary of Holdings or to an employee stock ownership plan or a trust established by Holdings or any of its Subsidiaries for the benefit of their employees); plus

(D) except as included in clause (E) below, an amount equal to the sum of (x) the aggregate amount of cash and the Fair Market Value of any asset other than cash received by Holdings, the Issuer or any Restricted Subsidiary subsequent to the Issue Date with respect to Investments (other than Permitted Investments) made by Holdings, the Issuer or any Restricted Subsidiary in any Person (other than Holdings, the Issuer or any Restricted Subsidiary) and resulting from repurchases, repayments or redemptions of such Investments by such Person, and any proceeds realized on the sale of any such Investment, and (y) in the event that Holdings redesignates an Unrestricted Subsidiary to be a Restricted Subsidiary, the portion (proportionate to Holdings’ equity interest in such Subsidiary) of the Fair Market Value of the net assets of such Unrestricted Subsidiary at the time such Unrestricted Subsidiary is designated a Restricted Subsidiary (other than to the extent Holdings’ Investment in such Unrestricted Subsidiary constituted a Permitted Investment); provided, however, that the foregoing sum shall not exceed, in the case of any such Person or Unrestricted Subsidiary, the amount of Investments (excluding Permitted Investments) previously made (and treated as a Restricted Payment) by Holdings, the Issuer or any Restricted Subsidiary in such Person or Unrestricted Subsidiary; plus

(E) 50% of (x) any dividends received in cash by Holdings, the Issuer or a Restricted Subsidiary after the Separation Date from an Unrestricted Subsidiary or (y) the net proceeds from the sale or other disposition of the Capital Stock of an Unrestricted Subsidiary received in cash by Holdings, the Issuer or a Restricted Subsidiary after the Separation Date, in each case, to the extent that such dividends or proceeds were not otherwise included in Consolidated Net Income for such period.

For the avoidance of doubt, the Transactions shall be excluded for the calculation of the amount of Restricted Payments under this paragraph (a)(3).

(b) The preceding provisions will not prohibit:

(1) any Restricted Payment made out of the Net Cash Proceeds of the substantially concurrent sale of, or made by exchange for, Qualified Capital Stock of Holdings or a substantially concurrent cash capital contribution received by Holdings from its shareholders with respect to its Qualified Capital Stock, with a sale, exchange or contribution being deemed substantially concurrent if such Restricted Payment occurs not more than 120 days after such sale, exchange or contribution; provided, however, that (A) such Restricted Payment shall be excluded in the calculation of the amount of Restricted Payments and (B) the Net Cash

 

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Proceeds from such sale or such cash capital contribution (to the extent so used for such Restricted Payment) shall be excluded from the calculation of amounts under clause (3)(B) of paragraph (a) above;

(2) any purchase, repurchase, redemption, defeasance or other acquisition or retirement for value of Subordinated Obligations of Holdings, the Issuer or any Subsidiary Guarantor made by exchange for, or out of the proceeds of the substantially concurrent Incurrence of, Indebtedness of such Person which is permitted to be Incurred pursuant to the covenant described under “—Limitation on Indebtedness,” with an Incurrence being deemed substantially concurrent if such purchase, repurchase, redemption, defeasance or other acquisition or retirement for value occurs not more than 120 days after such Incurrence; provided, however, that such purchase, repurchase, redemption, defeasance or other acquisition or retirement for value shall be excluded in the calculation of the amount of Restricted Payments;

(3) the payment of any dividend, distribution or redemption of any Capital Stock or Subordinated Indebtedness within sixty (60) days after the date of declaration thereof or call for redemption if, at such date of declaration or call for redemption, such payment or redemption was permitted by the provisions of paragraph (a) of this covenant (the declaration of such payment will be deemed a Restricted Payment under paragraph (a) of this covenant as of the date of declaration and the payment itself will be deemed to have been paid on such date of declaration and will not also be deemed a Restricted Payment under paragraph (a) of this covenant); provided, however, that any Restricted Payment made in reliance on this clause (3) shall reduce the amount available for Restricted Payments pursuant to clause (a)(3) above only once;

(4) the purchase, redemption or other acquisition or retirement for value of shares of Capital Stock of Holdings or any of its Subsidiaries from officers, former officers, employees, former employees, directors or former directors of Holdings or any of its Subsidiaries (or permitted transferees of such officers, former officers, employees, former employees, directors or former directors), pursuant to the terms of the agreements (including employment agreements) or plans (or amendments thereto) under which such individuals purchase or sell or are granted the option to purchase or sell, shares of such Capital Stock; provided, however, that the aggregate amount of such Restricted Payments (excluding amounts representing cancelation of Indebtedness) shall not exceed $10 million in any calendar year, with any portion of such $10 million amount that is unused in any calendar year to be carried forward to the next successive calendar year and added to such amount for that successive year, plus, to the extent not previously applied or included, the Net Cash Proceeds received by Holdings from sales of Qualified Capital Stock of Holdings to employees or directors of Holdings or any of its Subsidiaries that occur after the Separation Date (to the extent such Net Cash Proceeds have not otherwise been applied to the payment of Restricted Payments by virtue of clause (3) of paragraph (a) above); provided further, however, that such Restricted Payments shall be excluded in the calculation of the amount of Restricted Payments;

(5) the declaration and payments of dividends on Disqualified Stock or any Preferred Stock of any Restricted Subsidiary issued pursuant to the covenant described under “—Limitation on Indebtedness;” provided, however, that, at the time of payment of such dividend, no Default shall have occurred and be continuing (or result therefrom); provided further, however, that such dividends shall be excluded in the calculation of the amount of Restricted Payments;

(6) repurchases, redemptions or other acquisitions or retirement for value of Capital Stock (a) deemed to occur upon exercise, conversion or exchange of stock options, warrants or other rights to acquire Capital Stock, if such Capital Stock represents a portion of the exercise price of such options, warrants or other rights or (b) made in lieu of withholding taxes in connection with any such exercise, conversion or exchange; provided, however, that such Restricted Payments shall be excluded in the calculation of the amount of Restricted Payments;

(7) cash payments in lieu of the issuance of fractional shares in connection with the exercise, conversion or exchange of warrants, options or other securities convertible into or exchangeable for Capital Stock of Holdings or in connection with the Transactions; provided, however, that such payments shall be excluded in the calculation of the amount of Restricted Payments;

 

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(8) if no Default shall have occurred and be continuing, the payment, purchase, redemption, defeasance or other acquisition or retirement of Subordinated Obligations of Holdings, the Issuer or any Subsidiary Guarantor, in each case, (a) in the event of a Change of Control, at a purchase price not greater than 101% of the principal amount of such Subordinated Obligations or (b) in the event of an Asset Sale, at a purchase price not greater than 100% of the principal amount of such Subordinated Obligations, plus, in either case, any accrued and unpaid interest thereon; provided, however, that prior to such payment, purchase, redemption, defeasance or other acquisition or retirement, the Issuer (or a third party to the extent permitted by the Indenture) has made a Change of Control Offer or an Asset Sale Offer, as applicable, with respect to the notes as a result of such Change of Control or Asset Sale, and has repurchased all notes validly tendered and not withdrawn in connection with such Change of Control Offer or Asset Sale Offer; provided further, however, that such payments, purchases, redemptions, defeasances or other acquisitions or retirements shall be included in the calculation of the amount of Restricted Payments;

(9) payments of intercompany subordinated Permitted Indebtedness the Incurrence of which was permitted under clause (2) of paragraph (b) of the covenant described under “—Limitation on Indebtedness”; provided, however, that no Event of Default has occurred and is continuing or would otherwise result therefrom; provided further, however, that such payments shall be excluded in the calculation of the amount of Restricted Payments;

(10) so long as no Default or Event of Default has occurred and is continuing or will result therefrom, other Restricted Payments in an aggregate amount not to exceed the greater of (i) $50 million and (ii) 4% of Consolidated Net Tangible Assets of Holdings, the Issuer and the Restricted Subsidiaries determined as of the date of such Restricted Payment, provided, however, that such payments shall be included in the calculation of the amount of Restricted Payments;

(11) the Transactions substantially on the terms described in the Offering Memorandum, provided, however, that such payments shall be excluded in the calculation of the amount of Restricted Payments;

(12) dividends or distributions in an aggregate amount per annum not to exceed 6% of the net cash proceeds received by or contributed to the capital of Holdings in connection with any Qualified Equity Offering following the Issue Date, provided, however, that such payments shall be included in the calculation of the amount of Restricted Payments;

(13) so long as no Default or Event of Default has occurred and is continuing or will result therefrom, other Restricted Payments if, immediately after giving effect to such Restricted Payment (including the Incurrence of any Indebtedness to finance such payment) as if it had occurred at the beginning of the most recently ended four (4) full consecutive fiscal quarters for which internal consolidated financial statements of Holdings are available, the Consolidated Leverage Ratio would not be greater than 2.5 to 1.0, provided, however, that such payments shall be included in the calculation of the amount of Restricted Payments; and

(14) transactions pursuant to other agreements or arrangements in effect on the Separation Date substantially on the terms described in the Offering Memorandum or any amendment, modification or supplement thereto or replacement thereof, as long as the terms of such agreement or arrangement, as so amended, modified, supplemented or replaced is not materially more disadvantageous to Holdings, the Issuer and the Restricted Subsidiaries, taken as a whole, than the terms of such agreement or arrangement described in the Offering Memorandum, provided, however, that such payments shall be excluded in the calculation of the amount of Restricted Payments.

For purposes of determining compliance with this covenant, if a Restricted Payment meets the criteria of more than one of the categories of Restricted Payments described in the preceding clauses (1) through (10) and (14), the Issuer will be permitted to divided or classify (or later divide, classify or reclassify in whole or in part in its sole discretion) such Restricted Payment in any manner that complies with the covenant.

 

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Notwithstanding the foregoing, Holdings and the Issuer shall not make any Restricted Payment prior to the consummation of the Transactions (other than any Restricted Payments made as a part of the Transactions substantially on the terms described in the Offering Memorandum).

Limitation on Restrictions on Distributions from Restricted Subsidiaries

The Issuer will not, and Holdings will not permit any Restricted Subsidiary to, create or otherwise cause or permit to exist or become effective any consensual encumbrance or restriction on the ability of any Restricted Subsidiary to (a) pay dividends or make any other distributions on its Capital Stock to the Issuer or a Restricted Subsidiary or pay any Indebtedness owed to the Issuer or any Restricted Subsidiary, (b) make any loans or advances to the Issuer or any Restricted Subsidiary or (c) transfer any of its property or assets to the Issuer or any Restricted Subsidiary, except:

(1) with respect to clauses (a), (b) and (c),

(A) any encumbrance or restriction pursuant to an agreement in effect at or entered into on or prior to the Separation Date substantially on the terms and to the extent